PINNED:  index

   Software
       |            +-Software
       |      index-+-artificial 
       |        |   +-deepmind
       |        |   +-information
       |        |   +-machine lea
       |        |   +-reflection
       |        |   +-seminars
       |        |   +-tensorflow
       |        |
       +---+----+
           |
           V
         emacs

Emacs-lisp  Org-mode  lispy  org-brain

$NOTES/ws/english/words.txt
$NOTES/learn.txt
$NOTES/arxiv.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/abstract-algebra.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ade.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/algorithm-analysis.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/algorithms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/analysis.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ansible.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/apis.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/architecture.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/artificial-intelligence-ai.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/arxiv.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/astrophysics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/automation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/autonomy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/aws-amazon-web-services.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/big-query.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/biochemistry.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/blockchain.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/brain-computer-interface-bci.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/build-tools.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/can-bus.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/celery.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/chemistry.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/chinese-words.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/cicd.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/cli.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/cloud.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/compilers.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/complexity.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/compression.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/computation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/computer-science.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/computer-vision.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/computing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/configuration-management.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/consensus.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/continuous-integration.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/continuous.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/conversational-ai.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/cpp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/crash-reporting.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/cryptography.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/databases.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/data-mining.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/data-science.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/data-structures-algorithms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/decentralised-workforce-human-cloud.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/decision-tree-learning.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/deep-learning.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/deployment.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/devops.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/diagrams-graphs-charts.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/docker.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/dotnet.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/electricity.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/elk-elastic-search.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/emacs-lisp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/emacs.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/english-punctuation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/english.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/epigraphy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/extrasensory-perception-esp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/facebook-research.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/facebook.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/finances.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/fluid-mechanics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/fmea-failure-mode-and-effects-analysis.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/formal-languages.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/fortescue.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/french.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/functional-programming-fp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/gdb.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/general-ai-agi.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/general.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/genetic-algorithms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/genetics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/geometry.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/github-semantic.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/gitlab.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/golang.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/google-cloud.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/gps.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/graph-theory.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hardware-infrastructure.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hardware.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hashicorp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hashing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/haskell.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hawaiian.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hdf.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/hil-hardware-in-the-loop.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/history.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/information-retrieval.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/information-theory.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/infrastructure.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/internet.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/inventions.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ip-networking.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/javascript.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/jobs.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/keras.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/kernel.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/knowledge.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/kubernetes-k8s.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/lambda-calculus.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/language-agnostic-programming.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/law.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/licenses.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/linear-algebra.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/linguistics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/linux.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/lisp-based-languages.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/lisp.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/logic.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/machine-learning.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/make.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/maori.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/marketing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/markup-languages.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/mathematical-algorithms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/math.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/mechanical-engineering.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/metaphysics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/microservices.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/mining-wa.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/mocking.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/morse-code.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/neural-ir.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/neuroscience.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/nix.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/nlp-natural-language-processing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/nmt-neural-machine-translation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/number-theory.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/numpy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/oauth2.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/object-oriented.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/oncology.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ontology.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/openai.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/open-source-alternatives.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/operating-systems.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/operations.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/optimization.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/pacific-edge.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/parapsychology.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/parsers.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/part-of-speech-labels.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/pathology.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/people.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/perl.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/pharmacy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/philosophy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/php.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/phylogenetics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/physics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/platform-engineering.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/preprocessing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/probabilistic-data-structures.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/probability.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/problog.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/programming-challenges.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/programming-idioms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/programming-languages.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/programming.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/prolog.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/provisioning.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/psychology.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/puppet.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/purescript.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/python.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/quantum-algorithms.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/racket.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/random-number-generation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/rasa.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/rat.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/reading.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/regular-expressions-regex.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/reinforcement-learning.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/research.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/risk-management.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/r-lang.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/robotics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/robots.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/rocket-lab.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ros2.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/rosie.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ros.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/ruby.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/rust.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/scheme.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/science.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/security.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/self-reflection.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/slam.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/software-architecture.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/software-development.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/software-engineering.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/space-flight.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/space.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/spacy.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/spark.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/statistics.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/streaming.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/sysadmin-system-administration.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/systemd.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/systems-engineering.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/tcl.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/tech.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/telecommunications.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/telemetry.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/tensorflow.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/terraform.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/testing.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/thinking.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/time-management.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/tooling.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/unix.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/usa-united-states-of-america.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/virtualisation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/virtual-reality.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/visualisation.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/vmware.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/web-development.txt
$NOTES/ws/glossaries/world.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/adjectives.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/collocations.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/colloquy.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/definitions.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/etymology.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/fav-phrases.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/fav-words.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/glossary.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/idioms.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/made-up-words.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/metaphors.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/misspellings.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/my-words.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/old.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/phrases.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/references.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/scratch.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/slang.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/terms.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/usage.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/useful-phrases.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/use-more.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/words2.txt
$NOTES/ws/english/words.txt

$NOTES/ws/english/words.txt
‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾

meritocracy
    Meritocracy is a political system in which
    economic goods and/or political power are
    vested in individual people on the basis
    of talent, effort, and achievement, rather
    than wealth or social class.

    Advancement in such a system is based on
    performance, as measured through
    examination or demonstrated achievement.

fixture
    A piece of equipment or furniture which is
    fixed in position in a building or
    vehicle.

fraternization
    Turning people into brothers by conducting
    social relations with people who are
    actually unrelated and/or of a different
    class (especially those with whom one
    works) as if they were siblings, family
    members, personal friends, or lovers.

    To fraternize also means to become allies
    with someone, especially the enemy.

vindictive
    Having or showing a strong or unreasoning
    desire for revenge.

abyssopelagic
    A layer of the pelagic zone of the ocean.

    "Abyss" derives from the Greek word
    ἄβυσσος, meaning bottomless.

    At depths of 3,000 to 6,000 metres, this
    zone remains in perpetual darkness.

    It alone makes up over 83% of the ocean
    and covers 60% of the Earth.

aspirational
    Having or characterized by aspirations to
    achieve social prestige and material
    success.

boilerplate
Boilerplate text
    Any written text that can be reused in new
    contexts or applications without
    significant changes to the original.

    The term is used in reference to
    statements, contracts and computer code,
    and is used in the media to refer to
    hackneyed or unoriginal writing.

thingim-ebob
    Used to refer to or address a person or
    thing whose name one has forgotten, does
    not know, or does not wish to mention.

    NLG: A thingamajig.

    NLG: an object whose name is unknown or
    has been forgotten.

thingamajig
    NLG: A thing of no importance; an object
    whose name is forgotten or not known.
    "you'll need a thingamajig to open it"

industrious
    What an industrious empire

contentious
    Causing or likely to cause an argument;
    controversial.

prescient
    Having or showing knowledge of events
    before they take place.

pertinent
    Here are the pertinent section of my init.el

zero-day
    Winzen said that it happened on Thursday
    night, a day after a PHP zero-day exploit
    was leaked.

cursory
    only have a cursory knowledge of

bespoke
    Example:
        We have bespoke libraries and often
        lots of them.

    (of goods, especially clothing) made to
    order.
        "a bespoke suit"

    (of a trader) making bespoke items of
    clothing.
        "the bespoke tailors of Savile Row"

    (of a computer program) written or adapted
    for a specific user or purpose.
        "completely bespoke software systems"

operatic
    extravagantly theatrical; histrionic.

vestige
    A trace or remnant of something that is
    disappearing or no longer exists.

ossified
    Turn into bone or bony tissue.

onerous
    (of a task or responsibility) involving a
    great deal of effort, trouble, or
    difficulty.

karmic
    relating to or characteristic of karma.
    "the karmic wheel of life"

    When IBM, in its ever-present omnipotence,
    needed to base their edlin on a Unix
    standard, did they mimic vi?

    No.

    Emacs?

    Surely you jest.

    They chose the most karmic editor of all.

    The standard.

soda
soda pop
pop
fizzy
fizzy drink
lolly water
seltzer
tonic

starlet
    A young actress with aspirations to become a star.

sanguine

parasitizing

visceral
    relating to deep inward feelings rather
    than to the intellect.

    Example:
    "the voters' visceral fear of change"

parabiosis
    Young blood transfusion refers to
    transfusing blood specifically from a
    young person into an older one with the
    intention of creating a medicinal benefit.

subsidy
government incentive
    A form of financial aid or support
    extended to an economic sector generally
    with the aim of promoting economic and
    social policy.

adulation
    Excessive admiration or praise.

Flattery
    The act of giving excessive compliments,
    generally for the purpose of ingratiating
    oneself with the subject.

prerogative
    A right or privilege exclusive to a
    particular individual or class.

    https://youtu.be/KGH7W3m4UZE?t=9

    prih-rog-at-ive

pertinent
    Relevant or applicable to a particular
    matter; apposite.

first-class citizen
    You can toss them around just like
    variables.

resilient
    Able to withstand or recover quickly from
    difficult conditions.

    Able to recoil or spring back into shape
    after bending, stretching, or being
    compressed.

metonymy
    The substitution of the name of an
    attribute or adjunct for that of the thing
    meant, for example suit for business
    executive, or the turf for horse racing.

Synecdoche
"syn ec do key"
    A synecdoche is a figure of speech in
    which a term for a part of something
    refers to the whole of something or vice
    versa.

    A synecdoche is a class of metonymy, often
    by means of either mentioning a part for
    the whole or conversely the whole for one
    of its parts.

    Examples from common English expressions
    include "suits" (for "businessmen"),
    "boots" (for "soldiers") (pars pro toto),
    and "America" (for "the United States of
    America") (totum pro parte).

reconcile
    1.
    restore friendly relations between.
    "the king and the archbishop were publicly reconciled"
    2.
    make (one account) consistent with another, especially by allowing for transactions begun but not yet completed.
    "it is not necessary to reconcile the cost accounts to the financial accounts"

slew
    The noun slew is from the Irish Gaelic
    sluagh, meaning "multitude."

    As an unrelated verb, it's the past tense
    of slay.

scuttle
    The captain is going to scuttle the ship.

    To sink or attempt to sink by making holes
    through the bottom. 2 : destroy, wreck .

prose
    Written or spoken language in its ordinary
    form, without metrical structure.

snark
    Noun sense of snide remarks.

    Derogatory or mocking in an indirect way.

    Devious and underhand.

collocation

idiosyncratic
    Relating to idiosyncrasy; peculiar or
    individual.

Motif

Unladen
    Not carrying a load.

bemusement
    puzzlement

leery
    Cautious or wary due to realistic suspicions.

nascent
    (especially of a process or organization)
    just coming into existence and beginning
    to display signs of future potential.

sigil
    An inscribed or painted symbol considered
    to have magical power.

    Special characters in a programming
    language, such as $ before a variable name
    in perl.

threshold
    "The limit before X."

    The magnitude or intensity that must be
    exceeded for a certain reaction,
    phenomenon, result, or condition to occur
    3or be manifested.

venial sin
    A lesser sin that does not result in a
    complete separation from God and eternal
    damnation in Hell as an unrepented mortal
    sin would.

earnest
    Resulting from or showing sincere and
    intense conviction.

pedagogical
    Relating to teaching.

plebe
    A newly entered cadet or freshman,
    especially at a military or naval academy.

Conflation
   1. A blowing together, as of many instruments in a concert,
      or of many fires in a foundry. [R.] --Bacon.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. a fusing together; merger of two or more things or ideas
      into one.
      [PJC]

Tenacious
   1. Holding fast, or inclined to hold fast; inclined to retain
      what is in possession; as, men tenacious of their just
      rights.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Apt to retain; retentive; as, a tenacious memory.
      [1913 Webster]

pretentious
    Attempting to impress by affecting greater
    importance or merit than is actually
    possessed.

amenable
    Open and responsive to suggestion; easily
    persuaded or controlled.

sensationalism
    The use of exciting or shocking stories or
    language at the expense of accuracy, in
    order to provoke public interest or
    excitement.

groupthink
    Thinking or making decisions as a group in
    a way that discourages creativity or
    individual responsibility.

sizzurp
    An intoxicating beverage made by adding
    cough syrup containing codeine and
    promethazine to a carbonated soft drink,
    consumed as a recreational drug.

Admonition
    Warn or reprimand someone firmly.

    An act or action of admonishing;
    authoritative counsel or warning.

Price gouging
    A pejorative term referring to when a
    seller spikes the prices of goods,
    services or commodities to a level much
    higher than is considered reasonable or
    fair, and is considered exploitative,
    potentially to an unethical extent.

misgiving
    A feeling of doubt or apprehension about
    the outcome or consequences of something.

disdain
    The feeling that someone or something is
    unworthy of one's consideration or
    respect.

Rashly
    Without careful consideration of the
    possible consequences; impetuously.

Scrutiny
    Critical observation or examination.

Fixation

Centralization
    Different from attention.
    Different from focus.

    A goal to be desired and difficult to
    attain.

Absorption

Contemplation
    The action of looking thoughtfully at
    something for a long time.

    Deep reflective thought.

Rumination
    The focused attention on the symptoms of
    one's distress, and on its possible causes
    and consequences, as opposed to its
    solutions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumination_(psychology)

awhile
    for a short time.

lobotomize
    perform a lobotomy on.
    "her brother had developed a schizophrenic illness and had been
    lobotomized"

    make (someone) less able to function mentally or emotionally.
    "couples we knew who had been lobotomized by the birth of their
    children"

indictment
    A criminal accusation that a person has committed a crime.

salient
    outstanding, striking

profusely
    abundantly, copiously, profusely, extravagantly

Pedantry
    Excessive concern with minor details and rules.

libation
    A drink poured out as an offering to a deity.

sensualist
    A person devoted to physical, especially sexual, pleasure.

azimuth
    direction from an observer

engender
    cause or give rise to (a feeling,
    situation, or condition).

    "The trust you engender."

liaison
    Communication or cooperation which
    facilitates a close working relationship
    between people or organizations.

archetype
    A statement, pattern of behavior, or
    prototype (model) which other statements,
    patterns of behavior, and objects copy or
    emulate.

    I think the emphasis is on the fact that
    other things "try" (in the effort sense)
    to emulate an archetype.

    That means an archetype represents an
    ideal thing, rather than simply being a
    'sketch'.

    A prototype on the other hand is not
    expected to be perfect.

unbecoming

prerogative
    [#law]

    An exclusive right bestowed by a
    government or state and invested in an
    individual or corporation, the content of
    which is separate from the body of rights
    enjoyed under the general law. It was a
    common facet of feudal law.

punitive
    disciplinary, corrective, correctional, retributive.

    punitive measures.

    inflicting or intended as punishment.
    "he called for punitive measures against the Eastern bloc"

congruency
    Try not to be incongruent
        Congruency is when what you're saying
        and how you're saying it match.

euphemistic
    inoffensive

    (vs. dysphemistic)

dysphemistic
    offensive

    (vs. euphemistic)

replete
    satiated
    filled to satisfaction

fatalistic
    relating to or characteristic of the
    belief that all events are predetermined
    and therefore inevitable.

incorporeal
    discorporate, unembodied, bodiless, unbodied, disembodied, spiritual

concede
conceded
    Admit or agree that something is true
    after first denying or resisting it.

    Example
    - the possibility of other universes has
      been scientifically conceded.

Impeachment
    The process by which a legislative body
    levels charges against a government
    official.

    It does not mean removal from office; it
    is only a statement of charges, akin to an
    indictment in criminal law.

misapprehension
    [rare noun]

    misconception

obnoxious
    extremely unpleasant.

attenuate
    weaken.

polyamorous
    The practice of, or desire for, intimate
    relationships with more than one partner,
    with the consent of all partners involved.

    It has been described as "consensual,
    ethical, and responsible non-monogamy".

enigmatic
    Incomprehensible.

ABL
ablative
ablative case
    [#latin]
    [#sanskrit]

    The case indicating the agent in passive
    sentences or the instrument or manner or
    place of the action described by the verb)

    The ablative case is found in ancient languages such as Latin and
    Sanskrit, as well as modern languages like Turkish and Hungarian.

lascivious
    sexy

rapport
    A close and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups
    concerned understand each other's feelings or ideas and communicate
    well.

sporadic

curiosity

contrivances

pretence
    An attempt to make something that is not the case appear true.

poised
    Having a composed and self-assured manner.

pertinent
    Relevant or applicable to a particular matter; apposite.

concordantly
    Agreeing; harmonious

ergo
    [#latin]

    therefore

Vis-a-vis
    Fancy way of saying "in regard to" or
    "compared to," as in: "He was
    substantially underpaid vis-a-vis other
    researchers."

apropos
    Said "apropo".

    - with reference to; concerning.
    - Of an appropriate or pertinent nature.
    - by the way, incidental.

concessions
    Example:
        "extracted concessions", tried to escape.

wordsmith

juncture
    A particular point in events or time.

contempt

rebuttal
    A refutation or contradiction.

vernacular
    slang, cant, jargon, lingo, argot, patois, vernacular

blip

emoting

faux
    made in imitation; artificial.

immolation
    Sacrifice.

    Always involves a sacrifice or offering of
    some sort.

    The word often invokes burning, a common
    method of sacrifice.

fortuitous

nonconformist
    Someone who doesn't conform to other
    people's ideas of how things should be.

    Activists, artists, street performers,
    your wacky uncle Marvin  anyone who
    marches to the beat of a different drummer
    is a nonconformist.

    Nonconformist is one of those words that
    has both a noun and an adjective form.

reductive
    Example:
        A typically reductive inquiry, doctor.

derotation
    A rotation in the opposite direction.

spangled

moniker
    Here are some of the issues with pgen that
    annoy me.

    The 1 in the LL(1) moniker implies that
    it uses only a single token lookahead, and
    this limits our ability of writing nice
    grammar rules.

vindictive
    Having or showing a strong or unreasoning
    desire for revenge.

go-between
    mediator

outrageous, egregious, preposterous
    Jackie Chiles quote.

egregious
    Outstandingly bad.

polysemy
    lexical ambiguity.

    The ambiguity of an individual word or
    phrase that can be used (in different
    contexts) to express two or more different
    meanings.

hypernym
superordinate word
superordinate
    A word that is more generic than a given
    word.

collocation
    [corpus linguistics]

    The habitual juxtaposition of a particular
    word with another word or words with a
    frequency greater than chance.

    Examples:
    - strong tea
    - heavy drinker

bigram
    A pair of consecutive written units such
    as letters, syllables, or words.

ad nauseam

inexactitude
    The quality of being inaccurate and having
    errors.

gratis
    Something that is available without charge
    or cost.

libre
    The most common Spanish adjective for
    "free"-but it isn't used to refer to
    something that is available without charge
    or cost.

    For that, the word to use almost always is
    gratis.

syndicate

Kleptocracy
    Government with corrupt leaders that use
    their power to exploit the people and
    natural resources of their own territory
    in order to extend their personal wealth
    and political powers.

    Typically, this system involves
    embezzlement of funds at the expense of
    the wider population.

innocuous

dewy-eyed
    Having eyes that are moist with tears
    (used typically to indicate that a person
    is nostalgic, naive, or sentimental).

pedantic
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pedantic

chorale

meronyms
    A term which denotes part of something but
    which is used to refer to the whole of it,
    e.g. faces when used to mean people in I
    see several familiar faces present.

Coordinate Terms (sisters)
    A term which shares a hypernym with
    another.

euphemism
    A mild or indirect word or expression
    substituted for one considered to be too
    harsh or blunt when referring to something
    unpleasant or embarrassing.

assiduously
    With great care and persistence.

adjudicator
    Someone who presides, judges, and
    arbitrates during a formal dispute or
    competition.

    They have numerous purposes, including
    preliminary legal judgments, to determine
    applicant eligibility, or to assess
    contenders' performance in competitions.

protracted
    lasting for a long time or longer than
    expected or usual.

Autodidacticism
autodidactism
self-education
self-learning
self-teaching
    Education without the guidance of masters
    (such as teachers and professors) or
    institutions (such as schools).

    Generally, an autodidact is an individual
    who chooses the subject they will study,
    their studying material, and the studying
    rhythm and time.

    An autodidact may or may not have formal
    education, and their study may be either a
    complement or an alternative to it.

    Many notable contributions have been made
    by autodidacts.

PSA
Public Service Announcement

sordid
    Involving immoral or dishonourable actions
    and motives; arousing moral distaste and
    contempt.

subsume
    Include or absorb (something) in something
    else [from below].

    Latin:
        - sub
          from below,
        - sumere
          take.

farrago
    A confused mixture.

disenfranchise
    Deprive (someone) of the right to vote.

whirring
    (especially of a machine or a bird's
    wings) make a low, continuous, regular
    sound.

dissolution
    The closing down or dismissal of an
    assembly, partnership, or official body.

    Example:
        On one level, the liquid mirror is
        just a manifestation of the
        dissolution of the fake reality of the
        Matrix.

quintessential
    Representing the most perfect or typical
    example of a quality or class.

satori
    Sudden enlightenment.

    Example:
        ewwlinks "+/satori" "https://www.quora.com/What-happens-to-Neo-at-the-end-of-The-Matrix-Revolutions-Is-he-dead-or-just-unconscious"

garish
    Obtrusively bright and showy; lurid.

pittance
    A very small or inadequate amount of
    money.

tumultuous

aught
    Anything at all.

baptism of fire
    a difficult introduction to a new job or activity.

antecedents
    a thing that existed before or logically precedes another.

stoically
    Without showing one's feelings or
    complaining about pain or hardship.

opined
    held and stated one's opinion.

opine
    hold and state as one's opinion.

couture
    The design and manufacture of fashionable
    clothes to a client's specific
    requirements and measurements.

contemptible
    Deserving contempt; despicable.

    "contemptible contraption"

smorgasbord
    A range of open sandwiches and delicacies
    served as hors d'oeuvres or a buffet.

deterge
    Cleanse thoroughly.

reveller
    A person who is enjoying themselves in a
    lively and noisy way.

perfidious
    deceitful and untrustworthy.

misestimation
    oh babe can you please not tell mum what i
    got u for ur bday to avoid hypothetical
    present misestimation

Chamberlain
    The officer in charge of managing the
    household of a sovereign or other noble
    figure.

vigor
    physical strength and good health.
    effort, energy, and enthusiasm.

micturition
    the action of urinating.

stench
    a strong and very unpleasant smell.

fetid
    smelling extremely unpleasant.

    Example:
        fetid stench

chicanery
    The use of trickery to achieve a
    political, financial, or legal purpose.

    Example
        On Odysseus's return, disguised as an
        old beggar, he finds that Penelope has
        remained faithful.

        She has devised tricks to delay her
        suitors, one of which is to pretend to
        be weaving a burial shroud for
        Odysseus's elderly father Laertes and
        claiming that she will choose a suitor
        when she has finished.

        Every night for three years, she
        undoes part of the shroud, until
        Melantho, one of twelve unfaithful
        slave women, discovers her chicanery
        and reveals it to the suitors.

elucidated
    make (something) clear; explain.

prodigious
    Remarkably or impressively great in
    extent, size, or degree.

    "present in prodigious numbers"

ablution
    A ceremonial act of washing parts of the
    body or sacred containers.

exsanguination
    The action of draining a person, animal,
    or organ of blood.

portent
    A sign or warning that a momentous or
    calamitous event is likely to happen.

cartharsis
    The process of releasing, and thereby
    providing relief from, strong or repressed
    emotions.

incontrovertibly
    not able to be denied or disputed.

    "incontrovertible proof"

revivification
    To impart new life, energy, or spirit to:
    a new leader who revivified the movement;
    a celebration that revivified our spirits.

    [French revivifier, from Old French, to
    come back to life, from Latin
    *revīvificāre, to revivify : Latin re-,
    re- + Latin vīvificāre, to vivify; see
    vivify.] re. · vivi.

frivolity
    lack of seriousness; light-heartedness.

    "a night of fun and frivolity"

festal
    relating to or characteristic of a
    celebration or festival.

    "plum pudding was originally served on
    festal days as a main course"

offal
variety meats
pluck
organ meats
    The viscera and entrails of a butchered
    animal.

pugnacious
    eager or quick to argue, quarrel, or
    fight.

    "his public statements became increasingly
    pugnacious"

malingerer
skulker
shammer
    Someone shirking their duty by feigning
    illness or incapacity.

extirpate
    To pluck up by the stem or root; to root
    out; to eradicate, literally or
    figuratively; to destroy wholly; as, to
    extirpate weeds; to extirpate a tumor; to
    extirpate a sect; to extirpate error or
    heresy.

imbecile
    im· buh· seel

bodacious
    excellent, admirable, or attractive.

proclivity
    A tendency to choose or do something
    regularly; an inclination or
    predisposition towards a particular thing.

convolution
    A thing that is complex and difficult to
    follow.

    A coil or twist.

* Confusing English
** precede vs proceed
** preceding vs proceeding

accost
    Approach and address (someone) boldly or
    aggressively.

solicited
    Ask for or try to obtain (something) from
    someone.

    Accost someone and offer one's or someone
    else's services as a prostitute.

crisis
    A time of intense difficulty or danger.

    A time when a difficult or important
    decision must be made.

    The turning point of a disease when an
    important change takes place, indicating
    either recovery or death.

complicit
    involved with others in an activity that
    is unlawful or morally wrong.

mischaracterization
    The act of characterizing something in an
    inaccurate or misleading way.

folio
    The term "folio", from the Latin folium
    (leaf), has three interconnected but
    distinct meanings in the world of books
    and printing.

    It is firstly a term for a common method
    of arranging sheets of paper into book
    form, folding the sheet only once, and a
    term for a book made in this way.

    Secondly, it is a general term for a
    sheet, leaf or page in (especially)
    manuscripts and old books, and thirdly, an
    approximate term for the size of a book,
    and for a book of this size.

perspicillum
    Old word for telescope.

notion
    impression, feeling, belief, notion, opinion

pancaea
cure-all
    A solution or remedy for all difficulties
    or diseases.

prefigured
    imagine, conceive of, ideate, envisage

fanfare
    A short ceremonial tune or flourish played
    on brass instruments, typically to
    introduce something or someone important.

    Emacs has a fanfare message when it
    starts.

survivability
    The ability to remain alive or continue to
    exist.

    The term has more specific meaning in
    certain contexts.

ecstatic
    Feeling or expressing overwhelming
    happiness or joyful excitement.

    Involving an experience of mystic
    self-transcendence.

OG
Original gangster
    Slang term for someone who's incredibly
    exceptional, authentic, or "old-school."

connote
    To convey in addition to exact explicit
    meaning.

    Examples:
    -   all the misery that poverty connotes
    -   For her, the word "family" connotes
        love and comfort.

promulgated
    Promote or make widely known (an idea or
    cause).

cavalier
    Showing a lack of proper concern; offhand.

shoehorn
    Force into an inadequate space.

diametrically
    (with reference to opposition) completely;
    directly.

    Example:
        diametrically opposed.

salt plain
salt pan
salt flat
    A flat area of ground covered with salt
    and other minerals.

    They are usually purely white.

    They are found in desert areas.

incantation
    A series of words said as a magic spell or
    charm.

gusto
    enjoyment and enthusiasm in doing
    something.

Backporting
    The action of taking parts from a newer
    version of a software system or software
    component and porting them to an older
    version of the same software.

doting
    Extremely and uncritically fond of
    someone; adoring.

titular
    Holding or constituting a purely formal
    position or title without any real
    authority.

    Example:
        Commander Keen

EAFP
Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission
    Python has this as its coding style.

    What this means is that its often easier
    to just assume that something exists (like
    a key in a dict) and catch an exception if
    were wrong.

abstruse
    Difficult to understand; obscure.

incarnation
    An incarnate form; a personification; a
    manifestation; a reduction to apparent
    from; a striking exemplification in person
    or act.

    The best setup is a printed copy of this
    paper, a web browser showing the online
    library documentation and a running
    incarnation of ghci...

TLC
tender loving care.
    If someone or something needs some TLC,
    they need to be treated in a kind and
    caring way. TLC is an abbreviation for
    'tender loving care.'

incursion
    An invasion or attack, especially a sudden
    or brief one.

harassing
    The action of subjecting someone to
    aggressive pressure or intimidation.

hydrophobic
hydrophobicity
    The physical property of a molecule that
    is seemingly repelled from a mass of
    water.

    In contrast, hydrophiles are attracted to
    water.

    Hydrophobic molecules tend to be nonpolar
    and, thus, prefer other neutral molecules
    and nonpolar solvents.

sardonic
    If you describe someone as sardonic, you
    mean their attitude to people or things is
    humorous but rather critical.

    Grimly mocking or cynical.
    "Starkey attempted a sardonic smile"

Sardonic wit
    When something is cutting but not
    obviously cutting. Example- you are in a
    relationship with someone who lies to you
    a lot.

    Example:
        Sardonic Humor
        "Anyhow, I hope your day is as pleasant as you are."

        This means "fuck off".

privilege
    A special right, advantage, or immunity
    granted or available only to a particular
    person or group.

sluggardliness

sluggard
    A person who is habitually indolent.

conscientiousness
    The quality of wishing to do one's work or
    duty well and thoroughly.

obtuse
    Annoyingly insensitive or slow to
    understand.

SKU
stock keeping unit
    A number assigned to a product by a retail
    store to identify the price, product
    options and manufacturer of the
    merchandise.

    A SKU is used to track inventory in your
    retail store.

gratuitously
    Without good reason; unjustifiably.

barbarism
    Absence of culture and civilization.

epistemic
    relating to knowledge or to the degree of
    its validation.

anvil
    [metalworking tool]

    A large block of metal, with a flattened
    top surface, upon which another object is
    struck.

    As massive as is practical, because the
    higher their inertia, the more efficiently
    they cause the energy of striking tools to
    be transferred to the work piece.

curtailment
    The action or fact of reducing or
    restricting something.

    Example:
        curtailment of liberty

attrition
    The action or process of gradually
    reducing the strength or effectiveness of
    someone or something through sustained
    attack or pressure.

resigning
    Perspectives:
        An act of attrition against your team.

amenable
    1. conformable
    2. tractable / responsive
    3. liable to answer to a higher authority

eli5
    Explain like I'm 5.

grassroots movement
grassroots campaign
    One which uses the people in a given
    district, region, or community as the
    basis for a political or economic
    movement.

grisly
    Causing horror or disgust.

incitement
    The action of provoking unlawful behaviour
    or urging someone to behave unlawfully.

marketable
    Saleable.

    Fit to be offered for sale in a market.

Posterior
    Comes from the Latin word posterus,
    meaning "coming after".

    Posterior is often used as a technical
    term in biology and medicine to refer to
    the back side of things, and is the
    opposite of anterior, which refers to the
    front side.

    Examples:
    - posterior probability

Kakorrhaphiophobia
    An abnormal, persistent, irrational fear
    of failure.

    In clinical cases, it's debilitating: the
    fear of even the most subtle failure or
    defeat is so intense that it restricts a
    person from doing anything at all.

anachronism
    A thing belonging or appropriate to a
    period other than that in which it exists,
    especially a thing that is conspicuously
    old-fashioned.

    https://practicaltypography.com/alternate-figures.html

totient function
    The value of the totient function is the
    the number of coprimes of (relative to) n
    from 1 to n.

totative
    The totatives of n are the numbers counted
    when computing the value of the totient
    function.

pariah
    Outcast.

apartheid
    A system of institutionalised racial
    segregation that existed in South Africa
    and South West Africa from 1948 until the
    early 1990s

proceeds
    Money obtained from an event or activity.

FMV
full motion video

communiqué
    An official announcement or statement,
    especially one made to the media.

    Example:
        "the country's foreign ministry issued
        a communique"

charlatanism

angular momentum
    mvr

    https://youtu.be/_WHRWLnVm_M?t=226

conservation of angular momentum
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WHRWLnVm_M

diacritic
diacritical mark
diacritical point
diacritical sign
accent
    A glyph added to a letter or basic glyph.

macron
    [diacritic]

    A diacritical mark: it is a straight bar
    (¯) placed above a letter, usually a
    vowel.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Letters_with_macron

grapheme
    Ā, lowercase ā, is a grapheme, a Latin A
    with a macron, used in several
    orthographies.

conceptual encoding
    The ability to interpret metaphors.

    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21239104

infotainment
soft news
    A portmanteau of information and entertainment.

    A type of media, usually television, that
    provides a combination of information and
    entertainment.

    The term is usually used disapprovingly
    against more serious hard news.

soul searching
    Deep and anxious consideration of one's
    emotions and motives or of the correctness
    of a course of action.

insufferable
intolerable

anthology
    A collection of literary works chosen by
    the compiler; it may be a collection of
    plays, poems, short stories, songs or
    excerpts by different authors.

chrestomathy
    A selection of passages from an author or
    authors, designed to help in learning a
    language.

    Different from an anthology because of its
    didactic purpose.

demarcate
demarcating
    set the boundaries or limits of.
    "plots of land demarcated by barbed wire"

    separate or distinguish from.
    "art was being demarcated from the more objective science"

putative
    Generally considered or reputed to be.

pragmatics
    [subfield of linguistics and semiotics]

    Studies the ways in which context
    contributes to meaning.

    Pragmatics encompasses speech act theory,
    conversational implicature, talk in
    interaction and other approaches to
    language behavior in philosophy,
    sociology, linguistics and anthropology.

figure
    [verb]

    to be.
    appear.

    The question of the peace settlement is
    likely to figure prominently in the talks.

    The term cohesion does not figure in the
    index of the book.

collocated
    (of a word) be habitually juxtaposed with
    another with a frequency greater than
    chance.

predicate
    Both a noun and a verb.

    verb
        To say (i.e. to predicate) something
        about someone or something.

        Sounds like 'ate', not 'at'.

delineate
    Describe or portray (something) precisely.

Writer's Block
    When you can't think of what to write.
    This happens all the time with me trying
    to write emails.

nepotism
    The practice among those with power or
    influence of favoring relatives or
    friends, especially by giving them jobs.

debauchery
    Excessive indulgence in sex, alcohol, or
    drugs.

laudable
    (of an action, idea, or goal) deserving
    praise and commendation.

crepuscular
    Of, resembling, or relating to twilight.

tenebrous
    Dark; shadowy or obscure.

portent
    A sign or warning that a momentous or
    calamitous event is likely to happen.

baleful
    Threatening harm; menacing.

provisionally
    Subject to further confirmation; for the
    time being.

colophon
    A publisher's emblem or imprint, usually
    on the title page of a book.

    https://www.gwern.net/About#colophon

upset
    The case where an underdog wins.

underdog
    Popularly expected to lose.

    Opposite of top dog.

favorite
top dog

    Opposite of underdog.

saucy
    Sexually suggestive in a light-hearted and
    humorous way.

subjective analysis
    Where the feeling of the individual taking
    part in the analysis process determines
    the outcome.

    Unusable.

    Aside from being useless, subjective
    analysis also fails.

    Since analysis is used in news reporting,
    in business and in politics, it is bad to
    use subjective analysis in these fields.

objective analysis
    The opposite of subjective analysis.

    Fact-based, measurable, and observable.

subjective information
subjective writing
    Based on personal opinions,
    interpretations, points of view, emotions
    and judgement.

semaphore
    Simply a variable.

    This variable is used to solve critical
    section problems and to achieve process
    synchronization in the multi processing
    environment.

    A trivial semaphore is a plain variable
    that is changed (for example, incremented
    or decremented, or toggled) depending on
    programmer-defined conditions.

intimation
    An indication or hint.

Middleware
    Multipurpose software that provides
    services to applications outside of what's
    offered by the operating system.

    Any software between the kernel and user
    apps can be middleware.

Ornithology
    Branch of zoology that concerns the study
    of birds.

    Several aspects of ornithology differ from
    related disciplines, due partly to the
    high visibility and the aesthetic appeal
    of birds.

    [#jazz]
    Charlie (Bird) Parker

mural
    A mural is any piece of artwork painted or
    applied directly on a wall, ceiling or
    other permanent surfaces.

    A distinguishing characteristic of mural
    painting is that the architectural
    elements of the given space are
    harmoniously incorporated into the
    picture.

inimical
    Tending to obstruct or harm.

verisimilitude
    The appearance of being true or real.

    "the detail gives the novel some
    verisimilitude"

    Example
        The verisimilitude is better than any
        char-RNN output Ive seen.

        ewwlinks +/"verisimilitude" "https://www.gwern.net/GPT-2"

bimbo
    An attractive but unintelligent or
    frivolous young woman.

vapid
    Offering nothing that is stimulating or
    challenging; bland.

cerebral
    If you are a cerebral person, no one would
    ever call you a drama queen.

    You make decisions using your intelligence
    and cold, hard facts, instead of your
    emotions.

    The word cerebral gets its meaning from
    cerebrum, which is Latin for brain.

    Cerebral people use their brains instead
    of their hearts.

torpid
    Mentally or physically inactive;
    lethargic.

asexual
    Without sexual feelings or associations.

    Asexual individuals may still experience
    attraction but this attraction doesn't
    need to be realized in any sexual manner.

inclusionism
    The view that information should be
    liberally added and retained on Wikipedia.

    It is espoused by users called
    inclusionists who favor keeping and
    amending problematic articles over
    deleting them.

espoused
    Adopt or support (a cause, belief, or way
    of life).

    "she espoused the causes of justice and
    freedom for all"

machination
    A plot or scheme.

    "Born of Chuck's machinations."

    "secret machination"

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*+machination&case_insensitive=on&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=7&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bthe%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Ba%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsecret%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bevery%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bpolitical%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthis%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bor%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bof%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsome%20machination%3B%2Cc0#t2%3B%2C*%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bthe%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Ba%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsecret%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bevery%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bpolitical%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthis%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bor%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bof%20machination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsome%20machination%3B%2Cc0

volunteering
    Generally considered an altruistic
    activity where an individual or group
    provides services for no financial or
    social gain "to benefit another person,
    group or organization".

    "volunteer the information"

    Example:
        It is quite unusual to stay in a
        relationship and then volunteer the
        information that you don't love your
        partner.

        If a partner behaves in this strange
        way, then it is likely giving him or
        her some form of satisfaction.

verbiage
    Speech or writing that uses too many words
    or excessively technical expressions.

    This guy is right, but his verbiage is
    vehemently verbose.

meta
    (of a creative work) referring to itself
    or to the conventions of its genre; self-
    referential.

    Indicates a concept that is an abstraction
    behind another concept, used to complete
    or add to the latter.

    Example:
        In its simplest form, a book in which
        a character is writing a book or a
        movie in which a character is making a
        movie can be described as meta.

    Example:
        "the enterprise is inherently ‘meta’,
        since it doesn't review movies, for
        example, it reviews the reviewers who
        review movies"

    Meta means about the thing itself.

    It's seeing the thing from a higher
    perspective instead of from within the
    thing, like being self-aware.

chagrin
    Annoyance or distress at having failed or
    been humiliated.

    "to my chagrin, he was nowhere to be seen"

inclusionism
    https://www.gwern.net/In-Defense-Of-Inclusionism

deletionism
    ewwlinks +/"Deletionism" "https://www.gwern.net/In-Defense-Of-Inclusionism"

edn
extensible data notation
    Pronounced "eed-n".

mauve
    A pale purple color named after the mallow
    flower.

antsy
    agitated, impatient, or restless.

Dégustation
    The careful, appreciative tasting of
    various food, focusing on the gustatory
    system, the senses, high culinary art and
    good company.

    Dégustation is more likely to involve
    sampling small portions of all of a chef's
    signature dishes in one sitting.

languish
    (of a person or other living thing) lose
    or lack vitality; grow weak or feeble.

anatidaephobia
    A person suffering from this condition
    feels that somewhere in the world, a duck
    or a goose is watching him/her (not
    attacking or touching, simply watching the
    individual).

    Not a real phobia.

kleptomaniac
    Someone with an irrational urge to steal
    in the absence of an economic motive.

lull
    [noun]
    Often used in relation to a storm, but the
    term has a broader meaning as well.

    The lull before the storm.

    [verb]
    Calm or send to sleep, typically with
    soothing sounds or movements.

Bulletin Board System
BBS
    A computer or an application dedicated to
    the sharing or exchange of messages or
    other files on a network.

    Originally an electronic version of the
    type of bulletin board found on the wall
    in many kitchens and work places, the BBS
    was used to post simple messages between
    users.

supplicant
    A fervently religious person who prays to
    God for help with a problem, and it can
    also be someone who begs earnestly for
    something he or she wants.

    A younger brother entreating his sister to
    be allowed in her tree house could be
    described as a supplicant.

    Example:
        WPA Supplicant -- for the wifi

WPA Supplicant
wpa_supplicant
    [tool]

    Configures network interfaces and connect
    to wireless networks.

    It is intended to run as a daemon and
    other command to connect it.

    A basic configuration is as follows.

    On the first line GROUP=wheel allows any
    user in the wheel group to connect to an
    manage wireless connections.

amble
    To walk slowly or leisurely; stroll.
    An unhurried or leisurely walk.

ambler
    A person who is ambling or who ambles.

negativism
    The practice of being or tendency to be
    negative or skeptical in attitude while
    failing to offer positive suggestions or
    views.

Data Fabric
    [buzzword]

    An architecture and set of data services
    that provide consistent capabilities
    across a choice of endpoints spanning on-
    premises and multiple cloud environments.

    Data Fabric simplifies and integrates data
    management across cloud and on-premises to
    accelerate digital transformation.

rebuttal
    An instance of rebutting evidence or an
    accusation.

chuse
    Archaic spelling of CHOOSE

    https://github.com/JesseKPhillips/USA-Constitution/blob/master/Constitution.md

causality
    The relationship between cause and effect.

    Simple connections between cause and
    effect are linear and unidirectional.

spatiotemporal
    Belonging to both space and time or to
    space-time.

    vim +/"spatiotemporal chaos" https://www.quantamagazine.org/machine-learnings-amazing-ability-to-predict-chaos-20180418/?fbclid=IwAR38PMiJeXGRq36IPhKcZbb5mjt6F1bKzKrwHIhTwCGQW2vLVZGG7Zos6TI

pusillanimous
    Showing a lack of courage or
    determination; timid.

pejorative
    Expressing contempt or disapproval.

incensed
    Very angry; enraged.

hapless
    (especially of a person) unfortunate.

gambit
    A device, action, or opening remark,
    typically one entailing a degree of risk,
    that is calculated to gain an advantage.

platitudes
    A remark or statement, especially one with
    a moral content, that has been used too
    often to be interesting or thoughtful.

    Example:
        "shallow platitude"
        "You'll do amazing."

phatic
    Denoting or relating to language used for
    general purposes of social interaction,
    rather than to convey information or ask
    questions. Utterances such as hello, how
    are you? and nice morning, isn't it? are
    phatic.

    Example:
        "phatic statement of good intentions."

conceited
    Excessively proud of oneself; vain.

sexual dimorphism
    Sexual dimorphism is the condition where
    the two sexes of the same species exhibit
    different characteristics beyond the
    differences in their sexual organs.

    The condition occurs in many animals and
    some plants.

proselytising
    Convert or attempt to convert (someone)
    from one religion, belief, or opinion to
    another.

syllogism
    [type of logical argument]

    Applies deductive reasoning to arrive at a
    conclusion based on two or more
    propositions that are asserted or assumed
    to be true.

gregarious
    (of a person) fond of company; sociable.

fiefdom
fief
    A person's sphere of operation or control.

    Example:
        https://www.stilldrinking.org/take-better-screenshots

nootropic
    Drugs, supplements, and other substances
    that may improve cognitive function,
    particularly executive functions, memory,
    creativity, or motivation, in healthy
    individuals.

swooned
    faint, especially from extreme emotion.

    Be overcome with admiration, adoration, or
    other strong emotion.

unbeknown
    without the knowledge of (someone).
    "unbeknown to me, she made some enquiries"

    adjective: unbeknownst

levity
    The treatment of a serious matter with
    humour or lack of due respect.

facetious
    Treating serious issues with deliberately
    inappropriate humor; flippant.

levity vs facetious
    https://wikidiff.com/levity/facetious

precocious
    (of a child) having developed certain
    abilities or inclinations at an earlier
    age than is usual or expected.

commend
    Praise formally or officially.

intercede
    Intervene on behalf of another.

Intercession
intercessory prayer
    The act of praying to a deity on behalf of
    others.

    In Western Christianity, intercession
    forms a distinct form of prayer, alongside
    Adoration, Confession and Thanksgiving.

palantir
    A magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkien's
    fantasy legendarium.

    A palantír is a crystal ball, used for
    both communication and as a means of
    seeing events in other parts of the world.

feature complete
    Denoting a version of a piece of software
    having all the functionality intended for
    the final version but requiring some
    improvements and fixes before release.

bigot
    A person who is intolerant toward those
    holding different opinions.

    A person who is intolerant of opinions,
    lifestyles, or identities that are
    different from his or her own.

    Mostly, the person's opinions are based on
    prejudice.

    Obstinate or unreasonable attachment to a
    belief, opinion, or faction; in
    particular, prejudice against a person or
    people on the basis of their membership of
    a particular group.

    "the difficulties of combating prejudice
    and bigotry"

boisterous
    noisy, energetic, and cheerful.

buffoonery
    Behaviour that is ridiculous but amusing.

buffoon
    A ridiculous but amusing person; a clown.

informant
informer
    A person who provides privileged
    information about a person or organization
    to an agency.

monomyth
the hero's journey
    [narratology]
    [comparative mythology]

    The common template of a broad category of
    tales and lore that involves a hero who
    goes on an adventure, and in a decisive
    crisis wins a victory, and then comes home
    changed or transformed.

tenure
    Give (someone) a permanent post,
    especially as a teacher or lecturer.

academic tenure
    Tenure is a category of academic
    appointment existing in some countries.

    A tenured post is an indefinite academic
    appointment that can be terminated only
    for cause or under extraordinary
    circumstances, such as financial exigency
    or program discontinuation.

singe
    Burn (something) superficially or lightly.

mineral
    A solid chemical compound that occurs
    naturally in pure form.

    Minerals are most commonly associated with
    rocks due to the presence of minerals
    within rocks.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_minerals_(complete)

    Gold is a mineral.

sophistry
    The use of clever but false arguments,
    especially with the intention of
    deceiving.

    "trying to argue that I had benefited in
    any way from the disaster was pure
    sophistry"

Sophist
    A sophist was a specific kind of teacher
    in ancient Greece, in the fifth and fourth
    centuries BCE.

    Many sophists specialized in using the
    tools of philosophy and rhetoric, though
    other sophists taught subjects such as
    music, athletics, and mathematics.

fallacious
    Based on a mistaken belief.

qualms
    An uneasy feeling of doubt, worry, or
    fear, especially about one's own conduct;
    a misgiving.

reductionist
    A person who analyzes and describes a
    complex phenomenon in terms of its simple
    or fundamental constituents.

trope
    A figurative or metaphorical use of a word
    or expression.

nuance
    A subtle difference in or shade of
    meaning, expression, or sound.

codex
codexes
codices
    An ancient manuscript text in book form.
    "the great legal compilation known as the
    Codex Euricianus"

    An official list of medicines, chemicals,
    etc.

renounce
    Formally declare one's abandonment of (a
    claim, right, or possession).

frigid
    Very cold in temperature.

desiccated
    Having had all moisture removed; dried
    out.

congenial
    (of a person) pleasant because of a
    personality, qualities, or interests that
    are similar to one's own.

belligerent
    Hostile and aggressive.

    An individual, group, country, or other
    entity that acts in a hostile manner, such
    as engaging in combat.

    Belligerent comes from Latin, literally
    meaning "one who wages war".

vacuous
    Having or showing a lack of thought or
    intelligence; mindless.

    "vacuous nonsense"

canonicalization
canonicalized
    The process of converting data that
    involves more than one representation into
    a standard approved format.

    Such a conversion ensures that data
    conforms to canonical rules.

admonished
    Warn or reprimand someone firmly.

coercive
    Relating to or using force or threats.

begets
    (typically of a man, sometimes of a man
    and a woman) bring (a child) into
    existence by the process of reproduction.

anthropomorphization
    To attribute human form or personality to
    things not human.

burgeoning
    Begin to grow or increase rapidly;
    flourish.

gratification
    Pleasure, especially when gained from the
    satisfaction of a desire.

waive
    Refrain from insisting on or using (a
    right or claim).

anodyne
    Not likely to provoke dissent or offense;
    inoffensive, often deliberately so.

    Example:
        Suppose my ambition is to learn a
        musical instrument.

        This seems pretty anodyne  although
        of course, not everyone who possesses
        this ambition will be lucky enough to
        be able to fulfill it.

pyrophoric
    Liable to ignite spontaneously on exposure
    to air.

decorum
    behaviour in keeping with good taste and
    propriety.

    "he had acted with the utmost decorum"

spaulders
    Pieces of armour in a harness of plate
    armour.

    Typically, they are a single plate of
    steel or iron covering the shoulder with
    bands (lames) joined by straps of leather
    or rivets.

pauldron
    A component of plate armor which evolved
    from spaulders in the 15th century.

    As with spaulders, pauldrons cover the
    shoulder area.

foundling
    An infant that has been abandoned by its
    parents and is discovered and cared for by
    others.

pawn
    A person or thing manipulated and used by
    others, or a game piece in the game of
    chess.

    A person unwittingly used in a scheme and
    taken advantage of by others is an example
    of a pawn.

    A chess piece that has the least value to
    the player is an example of a pawn.

restitution
    The restoration of something lost or
    stolen to its proper owner.

    "the ANC had demanded the restitution of
    land seized from blacks"

allusion
    An expression designed to call something
    to mind without mentioning it explicitly;
    an indirect or passing reference.

    Allusion is a figure of speech, in which
    an object or circumstance from unrelated
    context is referred to covertly or
    indirectly.

    It is left to the audience to make the
    direct connection.

    Where the connection is directly and
    explicitly stated by the author, it is
    instead usually termed a reference.

extended metaphor
    An extended metaphor, also known as a
    conceit or sustained metaphor, is an
    authors exploitation of a single metaphor
    or analogy at length through multiple
    linked tenors, vehicles, and grounds
    throughout a poem or story.

warmonger
    A person who encourages or advocates
    aggression towards other countries or
    groups.

despairing
    Showing the loss of all hope.

torrid
    Very hot and dry.

bikeshedding
    Spending disproportionate time and energy
    spent over an insignificant or unimportant
    detail of a larger concern.

    The term comes from an illustrative
    anecdote of a committee discussing a plan
    to build a nuclear power plant.

bona fied
    Genuine.

    Latin:
        in good faith

Fovea
    In the eye, a tiny pit located in the
    macula of the retina that provides the
    clearest vision of all.

    Only in the fovea are the layers of the
    retina spread aside to let light fall
    directly on the cones, the cells that give
    the sharpest image.

    Also called the central fovea or fovea
    centralis.

conflate
    Combine (two or more texts, ideas, etc.)
    into one.

irrefutable
    Impossible to deny or disprove.

intercalate
    Interpolate (an intercalary period) in a
    calendar.

    v +/"intercalate" "$HOME/blog/posts/haskell-functions.org"

strict
    Demanding that rules concerning behaviour
    are obeyed and observed.

smh
shaking my head
    Typically used when something is obvious,
    plain old stupid, or disappointment.

formulation
    A material or mixture prepared according
    to a formula.

    The action of creating or preparing
    something.

elucidate
    Make (something) clear; explain.

exposition
    Writing or speech primarily intended to
    convey information or to explain; a
    detailed statement or explanation;
    explanatory treatise.

boisterous
    Noisy, energetic, and cheerful.

caveat
    A warning or proviso of specific
    stipulations, conditions, or limitations.

NGS
Next generation sequencing
    Massively parallel or deep sequencing are
    related terms that describe a DNA
    sequencing technology which has
    revolutionised genomic research.

    Using NGS an entire human genome can be
    sequenced within a single day.

    https://github.com/ngless-toolkit/ngless
    https://ngless.embl.de

anisotropy
    The property of substances to exhibit
    variations in physical properties along
    different molecular axes.

    It is seen in crystals, liquid crystals
    and, less commonly, in liquids.

galling
    Causing annoyance or resentment; annoying.

solipsistic
    A theory holding that the self can know
    nothing but its own modifications and that
    the self is the only existent thing also :
    extreme egocentrism.

    Only one's mind is sure to exist.

    As an epistemological position, solipsism
    holds that knowledge of anything outside
    one's own mind is unsure; the external
    world and other minds cannot be known and
    might not exist outside the mind.

deterrent
    A thing that discourages or is intended to
    discourage someone from doing something.

Deterrence theory
    The idea that an inferior force, by virtue
    of the destructive power of the force's
    weapons, could deter a more powerful
    adversary, provided that this force could
    be protected against destruction by a
    surprise attack.

ingenuous
    Innocent and unsuspecting.

unscrupulous
    Having or showing no moral principles; not
    honest or fair.

ignoble
    Not honourable in character or purpose.

candor
candour
    The quality of being open and honest;
    frankness.

shibboleth
    A custom, principle, or belief
    distinguishing a particular class or group
    of people, especially a long-standing one
    regarded as outmoded or no longer
    important.

contrivance
    The use of skill to create or bring about
    something, especially with a consequent
    effect of artificiality.

trifle
    Treat without seriousness or respect.

frivolously
    Characterized by lack of seriousness or
    sense.

detestable
    Deserving intense dislike.

interception
    The action or fact of preventing someone
    or something from continuing to a
    destination.

rescind
    Revoke, cancel, or repeal (a law, order,
    or agreement).

quantity with the dimensions of 1
dimensionless quantity
    A quantity without any physical units and
    thus a pure number.

    Such a number is typically defined as a
    product or ratio of quantities which do
    have units, in such a way that all the
    units cancel out.

prejudice
    Preconceived opinion that is not based on
    reason or actual experience.

discrimination
    The unjust or prejudicial treatment of
    different categories of people, especially
    on the grounds of race, age, or sex.

prerogative
    An exclusive right or privilege held by a
    person or group, especially a hereditary
    or official right.

    An exclusive right bestowed by a
    government or state and invested in an
    individual or group, the content of which
    is separate from the body of rights
    enjoyed under the general law. It was a
    common facet of feudal law.

underbelly
    Underbelly is the side of something that
    is not normally seen.

    Figuratively, it means a vulnerable or
    weak part, similar to the term Achilles'
    heel, or alternatively, a hidden, illicit
    side of society.

incumbent
    Necessary for (someone) as a duty or
    responsibility.

prevailing
    Existing at a particular time; current.

    Having most appeal or influence;
    prevalent.

jeopardise
    Put (someone or something) into a
    situation in which there is a danger of
    loss, harm, or failure.

making book
    To gamble, either by placing or taking
    bets.

    To be very confident.

cathexis
    the process of investing mental,
    emotional, or libidinal energy or
    significance in an object, person, or
    idea.

switcheroo
    A sudden unexpected variation or reversal,
    often for a humorous purpose.

    It is colloquially used in reference to an
    act of intentionally or unintentionally
    swapping two objects.

apprehensive
    Anxious or fearful that something bad or
    unpleasant will happen.

edification
    The moral or intellectual instruction or
    improvement of someone.

unlettered
    (of a person) poorly educated or
    illiterate.

analogon
    analogue

    Example:
        This program is the analogon of
        libfuse's hello.c, a program that
        exposes a single file "file.txt" in
        the root directory.

analogate
    An instance of a thing represented in
    general by the analogon.

    For example, given the analogon "famous
    musician", the analogates might include
    Mozart and Liszt.

adrenalized
    Affected with adrenaline.

    Excited, charged, or tense.

shunt
    Push or pull (a train or part of a train)
    from the main line to a siding or from one
    line of rails to another.

    In medicine, a shunt is a hole or a small
    passage which moves, or allows movement
    of, fluid from one part of the body to
    another.

    The term may describe either congenital or
    acquired shunts; and acquired shunts may
    be either biological or mechanical.

congenital
    (of a person) having a particular trait
    from birth or by firmly established habit.

numinous
    Having a strong religious or spiritual
    quality; indicating or suggesting the
    presence of a divinity.

instill
    Gradually but firmly establish (an idea or
    attitude, especially a desirable one) in a
    person's mind.

Auxiliary
    Providing supplementary or additional help
    and support.

cognate
   Allied by blood; kindred by birth;
   specifically (Law), related on the mother's
   side.

   Of the same or a similar nature; of the
   same family; proceeding from the same stock
   or root; allied; kindred; as, a cognate
   language.

perverse
    Contrary to the accepted or expected
    standard or practice.

    Showing a deliberate and obstinate desire
    to behave in a way that is unreasonable or
    unacceptable.

    Example:
        The poorest people end up paying the most;
        it's quite perverse.

intercalation
embolism
intercalary days (related term)
    [timekeeping]

    The insertion of a leap day, week, or
    month into some calendar years to make the
    calendar follow the seasons or moon
    phases.

    Lunisolar calendars may require
    intercalations of both days and months.

furlough
    From Dutch: verlof, "leave of absence".

    In the United States, a furlough is a
    temporary leave of employees due to
    special needs of a company or employer,
    which may be due to economic conditions at
    the specific employer or in the economy as
    a whole.

burgeoning
    Begin to grow or increase rapidly;
    flourish.

dagger
obelisk
obelus

    A typographical symbol that usually
    indicates a footnote if an asterisk has
    already been used.

managerialism
    Belief in or reliance on the use of
    professional managers in administering or
    planning an activity.

syndicate (verb)
    wu syndicate

    3. syndicate -- (sell articles, television
    programs, or photos to several
    publications or independent broadcasting
    stations)

    Example:
        In my journey writing my blog,
        sometimes I syndicate my posts to
        other websites.

        One of them is CodeProject.

        What they require is just to submit my
        RSS feed and put a special link tag.

        Then theyll pull my posts that have
        this special tag.

visage
    A person's face, with reference to the
    form or proportions of the features.

    The manifestation, image, or aspect of
    something.

vestige
    A trace or remnant of something that is
    disappearing or no longer exists.

    A part or organ of an organism which has
    become reduced or functionless in the
    course of evolution.

vertical AI
    Designed in performing one specific task
    i.e. arrange a meeting or a call of the
    consumer along with the human employee.

droll
    Curious or unusual in a way that provokes
    dry amusement.

acquitted
    Free (someone) from a criminal charge by a
    verdict of not guilty.

parodic
    Being or resembling a parody.

tachyon
    A tachyon or tachyonic particle is a
    hypothetical particle that always travels
    faster than light.

    Most physicists believe that faster-than-
    light particles cannot exist because they
    are not consistent with the known laws of
    physics.

Tachypsychia
    A neurological condition that alters the
    perception of time, usually induced by
    physical exertion, drug use, or a
    traumatic event.

    For someone affected by tachypsychia, time
    perceived by the individual either
    lengthens, making events appear to slow
    down, or contracts, objects appearing as
    moving in a speeding blur.

arboreal
    (chiefly of animals) living in trees.

Doppler effect
    The Doppler effect is the change in
    frequency of a wave in relation to an
    observer who is moving relative to the
    wave source.

    It is named after the Austrian physicist
    Christian Doppler, who described the
    phenomenon in 1842.

burly
    (of a person) large and strong; heavily
    built.

salve
    A salve is a medical ointment used to
    soothe the surface of the body.

ragamuffin
    A person, typically a child, in ragged,
    dirty clothes.

indentured servitude
    An indentured servant or indentured
    laborer is an employee within a system of
    unfree labor who is bound by a signed or
    forced contract to work for a particular
    employer for a fixed time.

    The contract often lets the employer sell
    the labor of an indenturee to a third
    party.

apothecary
    A person who prepared and sold medicines
    and drugs.

security detail
PSD
PPD
    A protective team assigned to protect the
    personal security of an individual or
    group.

    PSDs can be made up of military personnel,
    private security contractors, or law
    enforcement agents.

judicious
    Having, showing, or done with good
    judgment or sense.

    Example:
        With judicious use of...

scapegoat
    A person who is blamed for the
    wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of
    others, especially for reasons of
    expediency.

expidency
    The quality of being convenient and
    practical despite possibly being improper
    or immoral; convenience.

new-found
new found
newfound
newly found
    Recently discovered or established.

doozie
    Something outstanding or unique of its
    kind.

    Example:
        Isabell went above and beyond today to
        source a UK House of Commons Christmas
        Jumper.

        Its my first Christmas Jumper and
        what a doozie to start with!

poster child
    A person or thing that epitomizes or
    represents a specified quality, cause,
    etc.

    Originally referred to a child afflicted
    by some disease or deformity whose picture
    is used on posters or other media as part
    of a campaign to raise money or enlist
    volunteers for a cause or organization.

remand
    Place (a defendant) on bail or in custody,
    especially when a trial is adjourned.

clause
    A unit of grammatical organization next
    below the sentence in rank and in
    traditional grammar said to consist of a
    subject and predicate.

spelunk
spelunking
    To explore natural caves.

    Geologists do a lot of spelunking.

    Scientists who study natural formations of
    the Earth do a lot of spelunking.

    The recreational pastime of exploring wild
    cave systems.

    The exploration of caves, especially as a
    hobby.

speleology
    The scientific study of caves and the cave
    environment.

salient
    Most noticeable or important.

    Example:
        Frankly we dont currently have a
        strong reputation for building privacy
        protective services, Zuckerberg
        writes. But Facebooks reputation is
        not the salient question: its business
        model is.

double black diamond
    The symbol used to designate very advanced
    ski trails.

    Its level of difficulty is rated as
    expert.

    Only very advanced skiers should consider
    trying it.

benefactor
    A person who gives some form of help to
    benefit a person, group or organization,
    often gifting a monetary contribution in
    the form of an endowment to help a cause.

elope
    Run away secretly in order to get married,
    especially without parental consent.

tenacity
    The quality or fact of being able to grip
    something firmly; grip.

abject
    (of something bad) experienced or present
    to the maximum degree.
    "his letter plunged her into abject misery"

    (of a person or their behaviour)
    completely without pride or dignity;
    self-abasing.

manservant
    A male servant.

Lackey
lacquey
    In its original definition, is a uniformed
    manservant.

    The modern connotation of "servile
    follower" appeared later, in 1588.

detritus
    Waste or debris of any kind.

His Dark Materials
The Golden Compass
    [trilogy of fantasy novels]

alethiometer
golden compass
    [#The Golden Compass]

    A fictional object.

    Allows those who are highly trained (or
    gifted) to know the answer to any
    question.

parachronism
    [anachronism]

    Assignment of a date that is too late.

prochronism
    [anachronism]

    Assignment of a date that is too early.

oubliette
    A secret dungeon with access only through
    a trapdoor in its ceiling.

illustrious
    Well known, respected, and admired for
    past achievements.

conceited
    Excessively proud of oneself; vain.

conceit
    [#modern literary criticism]

    More common with genre fiction, conceit
    often means an extended rhetorical device,
    summed up in a short phrase, that refers
    to a situation which either does not
    exist, or exists rarely, but is needed for
    the plot.

balmy
    (of the weather) pleasantly warm.

cahoots
    Colluding or conspiring together secretly.

garish
    Obtrusively bright and showy.

    Unpleasantly bright.

    Showy or too brightly colored.

    Lurid.

lurid
    Unpleasantly bright in colour, especially
    so as to create a harsh or unnatural
    effect.

doggedly
    In a manner that shows tenacity and grim
    persistence.

Rio Scale
    Nearly everyone is familiar with the
    Richter Scale for quantifying earthquake
    severity.

    Can we similarly quantify the importance
    of a candidate SETI signal?

    The Rio Scale is an attempt to do just
    that.

    It is an ordinal scale between zero and
    ten, used to quantify the impact of any
    public announcement regarding evidence of
    extraterrestrial intelligence.

enchanté
    Nice to meet you, enchanted, delighted.

carcass
    The dead body of an animal.

precession
    Example:
        It's a bit like a spinning top that
        starts to wobble as it's slowing down,
        the researchers said. This change in
        the rotational axis of a spinning body
        is called precession.

ostensibly
    As appears or is stated to be true, though
    not necessarily so; apparently.

    "ostensibly going insane".

humblebrag
    An ostensibly modest or self-deprecating
    statement whose actual purpose is to draw
    attention to something of which one is
    proud.

dyad
    Something that consists of two elements or
    parts.

diad
    A sequence of two (different) monomers in
    a polymer.

erratic
    Not even or regular in pattern or
    movement; unpredictable.

serendipity
    The occurrence and development of events
    by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

austerity
    Sternness or severity of manner or
    attitude.

wire harness
cable harness
wiring harness
cable assembly
wiring assembly
wiring loom
    An assembly of electrical cables or wires
    which transmit signals or electrical
    power.

Semmle Inc
    [code analysis platform provider]

    Built on research in compilers and data
    analysis, developed by a team from the
    University of Oxford, its patented
    technology creates a KB using all
    available data about the software
    development process (source code, issue
    tickets, development costs, team location,
    etc.), and allows its users to accurately
    and efficiently query that KB.

Root cause analysis
    An approach for identifying the underlying
    causes of an incident so that the most
    effective solutions can be identified and
    implemented.

    It's typically used when something goes
    badly, but can also be used when something
    goes well.

Functionally extinct
Functional extinction
    The extinction of a species or other taxon
    such that: It disappears from the fossil
    record, or historic reports of its
    existence cease; The reduced population no
    longer plays a significant role in
    ecosystem function; or.

    The population is no longer viable.

top brass
the top brass
    Exampel:
        The (company) top brass have/has
        decided that no action is necessary.

Psycholinguistic Modeling
    The study of the interrelation between
    linguistic factors and psychological
    aspects.

lynchpin
    A person or thing vital to an enterprise
    or organization.

    A pin passed through the end of an axle to
    keep a wheel in position.

    Example:
        "nurses are the linchpin of the
        National Health Service"

expedite
    Make (an action or process) happen sooner
    or be accomplished more quickly.

narcissist
    A person who has an excessive interest in
    or admiration of themselves.

partly
partially
    To some extent; not completely.

    Partly and partially are almost
    interchangeable.

ontology
    The branch of metaphysics dealing with the
    nature of being.

    A set of concepts and categories in a
    subject area or domain that shows their
    properties and the relations between them.

    "what's new about our ontology is that it
    is created automatically from large
    datasets"

pro bono
    Denoting work undertaken without charge,
    especially legal work for a client on low
    income.

    "the attorneys are representing him pro bono"

deliberation
    Long and careful consideration or
    discussion.

mitigation
    The action of reducing the severity,
    seriousness, or painfulness of something.

goaded
    Provoke or annoy (someone) so as to
    stimulate some action or reaction.

instructive
    Useful and informative.

    Example:
    - instructive question

smutty
    (of talk, writing, or pictures) obscene or
    lascivious.

victimization
    The action of singling someone out for
    cruel or unjust treatment.

grievance
    A real or imagined cause for complaint,
    especially unfair treatment.

paraphernalia
    Miscellaneous articles, especially the
    equipment needed for a particular
    activity.

tenements
    A room or a set of rooms forming a
    separate residence within a house or block
    of apartments.

demarcate
    Set the boundaries or limits of.

    separate or distinguish from.

Cognitive dissonance
    [#psychology]

    Occurs when a person holds two or more
    contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values,
    or participates in an action that goes
    against one of these three, and
    experiences psychological stress because
    of that.

Skeuomorphism
    The design concept of making items
    represented resemble their real-world
    counterparts.

    Skeuomorphism is commonly used in many
    design fields, including user interface
    (UI) and Web design, architecture,
    ceramics and interior design.

pedant
    A person who is excessively concerned with
    minor details and rules or with displaying
    academic learning.

splog
Spam blog
auto blog
neologism splog
    A blog which the author uses to promote
    affiliated websites, to increase the
    search engine rankings of associated sites
    or to simply sell links/ads.

commotion
    A state of confused and noisy disturbance.

admonition
    A firm warning or reprimand.

reprimand
    A formal expression of disapproval.

neologism
    A newly coined word or expression.

excerpt
    A short extract from a film, broadcast, or
    piece of music or writing.

alluvial
    Loose, unconsolidated soil or sediment
    that has been eroded, reshaped by water in
    some form, and redeposited in a non-marine
    setting.

    Alluvium is typically made up of a variety
    of materials, including fine particles of
    silt and clay and larger particles of sand
    and gravel.

Camber angle
camber
    The angle made by the wheels of a vehicle;
    specifically, it is the angle between the
    vertical axis of the wheels used for
    steering and the vertical axis of the
    vehicle when viewed from the front or
    rear.

    It is used in the design of steering and
    suspension.

beatnik
    A young person in the 1950s and early
    1960s belonging to a subculture associated
    with the beat generation.

carte blanche
    Unconditional authority; full
    discretionary power.

Aqua Regia
royal water
    A mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric
    acid.

    Disolves gold.

fatalist
    A philosophical doctrine that stresses the
    subjugation of all events or actions to
    destiny.

    Fatalism generally refers to any of the
    following ideas:
        The view that we are powerless to do
        anything other than what we actually
        do.

mar
marred
marring
    Impair the quality or appearance of;
    spoil.

holistic view
    Relating to or concerned with wholes or
    with complete systems rather than with the
    analysis of, treatment of, or dissection
    into parts.

geosynchronous
geostationary
    Most communications satellites today are
    what are known as geosynchronous or
    geostationary, which is to say that they
    orbit the same axis around which the Earth
    rotates daily, and they are situated at an
    altitude that permits their orbital period
    to be equal to the time it takes for Earth
    to perform a full rotation, as it does
    each 86,164 seconds.

    This has the neat side effect of the
    satellite appearing perfectly motionless,
    simply hanging at a single point in the
    sky when viewed from the surface of the
    Earth, which is quite convenient for
    aiming antennas at them.

ostentatious
    Characterized by pretentious or showy
    display; designed to impress.

glut
    An excessively abundant supply of
    something.

sprawling
    Spreading out over a large area in an
    untidy or irregular way.

lexical
    Of or relating to words

ERP
enterprise resource planning

SAP
Systemanalyse und Programmentwicklung
System Analysis and Program Development
    [ERP software]

    https://retool.com/blog/erp-for-engineers/

    Where companies store their core operational data.
    - sales projections,
    - purchase orders, and
    - inventory,
    - as well as the processes that act upon
      that data (e.g. paying out vendors when
      a purchase order is issued).

    In a sense, ERP is the brain of a
    company  it stores all important pieces
    of data and all of the actions possible in
    data-driven workflows.

tired
    In need of sleep or rest; weary.

judiciously
    With good judgement or sense.

mitigate
    Make (something bad) less severe, serious,
    or painful.

    "drainage schemes have helped to mitigate
    this problem"

unmitigated
    Absolute; unqualified.

    "the tour had been an unmitigated
    disaster"

Mesopotamia
Mesopotamian
    A historical region of Western Asia
    situated within the TigrisEuphrates river
    system, in the northern part of the
    Fertile Crescent, in modern days roughly
    corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, the
    eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern
    Turkey, and regions along the
    TurkishSyrian and IranIraq borders.

photogenic
    (especially of a person) looking
    attractive in photographs or on film.

fastidiously
    Excessively particular, critical, or
    demanding; hard to please: a fastidious
    eater. requiring or characterized by
    excessive care or delicacy; painstaking.

scrutinous
    Disposed to examine closely : inquisitve ,
    searching.

confounded
    Cause surprise or confusion in (someone),
    especially by acting against their
    expectations.

    "confounded relatives"

sinecure
    A position requiring little or no work but
    giving the holder status or financial
    benefit.

trinket
    A small ornament or item of jewellery that
    is of little value.

yonder
    At some distance in the direction
    indicated; over there.

kinda
    <informal speech>

    Kind of.

sorta
    <informal speech>

    Sort of.

mandela effect
    Occurs when a large mass of people
    believes that an event occurred when it
    did not.

prophylactic
    Intended to prevent disease.

beyond reckoning
    Outside the bounds of calculation.

reckoning
    The action or process of calculating or
    estimating something.

misconduct
    Wrongful, improper, or unlawful conduct
    motivated by premeditated or intentional
    purpose or by obstinate indifference to
    the consequences of one's acts.

    Misconduct can be considered an
    unacceptable or improper behavior,
    especially for a professional person.

reacquire
    Acquire (something) again.

promethean
    Having a life-giving quality; inspiring.

simulink
    MATLAB-based graphical programming
    environment for modeling, simulating and
    analyzing multidomain dynamical systems.

    Its primary interface is a graphical block
    diagramming tool and a customizable set of
    block libraries.

miffed
    Somewhat annoyed; peeved.

requisition
    An official order laying claim to the use
    of property or materials.

auxiliary
    Conferring aid or help; helping; aiding;
    assisting;

revolt
    To break away from or rise against
    constituted authority, as by open
    rebellion; cast off allegiance or
    subjection to those in authority; rebel;
    mutiny: to revolt against the present
    government.

    to turn away in mental rebellion, utter
    disgust, or abhorrence (usually followed
    by from)

    : He revolts from eating meat.

conferred
    Grant or bestow (a title, degree, benefit,
    or right).

    The advantages conferred by RPL in cases 1
    and 2 derive from the RPL syntax and
    expressive power.

folly
    Lack of good sense; foolishness.

viscerally
    Nn a manner that affects the viscera or
    gut.

    The soldier was wounded viscerally and was
    expected to die of gangrene.

    In a visceral manner; in a way that
    affects one's inner core or produces
    overwhelming emotions.

quintessence
    The most perfect or typical example of a
    quality or class.

Hausdorff dimension
fractal dimension
    A measure of roughness and/or chaos that
    was first introduced in 1918 by
    mathematician Felix Hausdorff.

    For instance, the Hausdorff dimension of a
    single point is zero, of a line segment is
    1, of a square is 2, and of a cube is 3.

    That is, for sets of points that define a
    smooth shape or a shape that has a small
    number of cornersthe shapes of
    traditional geometry and sciencethe
    Hausdorff dimension is an integer agreeing
    with the usual sense of dimension, also
    known as the topological dimension.

    However, formulas have also been developed
    that allow calculation of the dimension of
    other less simple objects, where, solely
    on the basis of their properties of
    scaling and self-similarity, one is led to
    the conclusion that particular
    objectsincluding fractalshave non-
    integer Hausdorff dimensions.

    Because of the significant technical
    advances made by Abram Samoilovitch
    Besicovitch allowing computation of
    dimensions for highly irregular or "rough"
    sets, this dimension is also commonly
    referred to as the HausdorffBesicovitch
    dimension.

artisan
    A worker in a skilled trade, especially
    one that involves making things by hand.

Gasket
    A gasket is a mechanical seal which fills
    the space between two or more mating
    surfaces, generally to prevent leakage
    from or into the joined objects while
    under compression.

    Gaskets allow for "less-than-perfect"
    mating surfaces on machine parts where
    they can fill irregularities.

ophthalmologist
    A specialist in the branch of medicine
    concerned with the study and treatment of
    disorders and diseases of the eye.

shoehorned
    Force into an inadequate space.

donga
    A transportable building with single
    rooms, often used on remote work sites or
    as tourist accommodation.

impasse
    A situation in which no progress is
    possible, especially because of
    disagreement; a deadlock.

provenance
    The place of origin or earliest known
    history of something.

    Emacs has provenance -- that's a big
    reason why I choose to use it.

    The provenance of a piece of data is the
    process that led to that piece of data

    From the French provenir, 'to come
    from/forth'.

    The chronology of the ownership, custody
    or location of a historical object.

    Originally mostly used in relation to
    works of art but is now used in similar
    senses in a wide range of fields,
    including archaeology, paleontology,
    archives, manuscripts, printed books, the
    circular economy, and science and
    computing.

    The primary purpose of tracing the
    provenance of an object or entity is
    normally to provide contextual and
    circumstantial evidence for its original
    production or discovery, by establishing,
    as far as practicable, its later history,
    especially the sequences of its formal
    ownership, custody and places of storage.

    The practice has a particular value in
    helping authenticate objects.

close of business
COB
    Often used to describe a deadline or time.

    For example, a co-worker may send you an
    e-mail saying they need to have work done
    by COB.

thespian
    Relating to drama and the theatre.

castigated
    reprimand (someone) severely.

Jesus music
    A style of Christian music that originated
    on the West Coast of the United States in
    the late 1960s and early 1970s.

    This musical genre developed in parallel
    to the Jesus movement.

    It outlasted the movement that spawned it
    and the Christian music industry began to
    eclipse it and absorb its musicians around
    1975.

denizens
    An inhabitant or occupant of a particular
    place.

prefecture
    A district under the government of a
    prefect.

air embolism
gas embolism
    A blood vessel blockage caused by one or
    more bubbles of air or other gas in the
    circulatory system.

    Air embolisms may also occur in the xylem
    of vascular plants, especially when
    suffering from water stress.

tout
    Attempt to sell (something), typically by
    pestering people in an aggressive or bold
    manner.

prescribe
    (of a medical practitioner) advise and
    authorize the use of (a medicine or
    treatment) for someone, especially in
    writing.

proscribe
    Forbid, especially by law.

PLC
Programmable logic controller
Programmable controller
    An industrial digital computer which has
    been ruggedized and adapted for the
    control of manufacturing processes, such
    as assembly lines, or robotic devices, or
    any activity that requires high
    reliability, ease of programming and
    process fault diagnosis.

    PLCs can range from small modular devices
    with tens of inputs and outputs (I/O), in
    a housing integral with the processor, to
    large rack-mounted modular devices with a
    count of thousands of I/O, and which are
    often networked to other PLC and SCADA
    systems.

slewing
    [elecronics]
    The response of an electronic device to a
    sudden large increase in input, especially
    one that causes the device to respond at
    its maximum rate.

    "The radio is still slewing (adjusting to
    max position) from Jonty's abrupt turn of
    the dial."

    [mechanics]
    The rotation of an object around an axis,
    usually the z axis.

    An example is a radar scanning 360 degrees
    by slewing around the z axis.

    This is also common terminology in
    astronomy.

    The process of rotating a telescope to
    observe a different region of the sky is
    referred to as slewing.

pep
    energy and high spirits; liveliness.

    "he was an enthusiastic player, full of
    pep"

variability
    The quality or state of being variable;
    variableness.

regal
    Of, resembling, or fit for a monarch,
    especially in being magnificent or
    dignified.

convalescent
convalescents
    A person who is recovering after an
    illness or operation.

denunciation
    Public condemnation of someone or
    something.

vagabond
    A person who wanders from place to place
    without a home or job.

therapeutic
    Relating to the healing of disease.

fiscal
    Relating to government revenue, especially
    taxes.

impels
    Drive, force, or urge (someone) to do
    something.

parishioner
    An inhabitant of a particular church
    parish, especially one who is a regular
    churchgoer.

sound bite
soundbite
    A short clip of speech or music extracted
    from a longer piece of audio, often used
    to promote or exemplify the full length
    piece.

monumental
    Great in importance, extent, or size.

accolade
    An award or privilege granted as a special
    honour or as an acknowledgement of merit.

perdition
    (in Christian theology) a state of eternal
    punishment and damnation into which a
    sinful and unpenitent person passes after
    death.

anaemic
    Suffering from anaemia.

    A condition in which the blood doesn't
    have enough healthy red blood cells.

cultivated
    Refined and well educated.

idiosyncratic
    Relating to idiosyncrasy; peculiar or
    individual.

disastrous
    Causing great damage.

corroberation
    Evidence which confirms or supports a
    statement, theory, or finding;
    confirmation.

bestiary
bestiarum vocabulum
    Acompendium of beasts.

    Originating in the ancient world,
    bestiaries were made popular in the Middle
    Ages in illustrated volumes that described
    various animals and even rocks.

    The natural history and illustration of
    each beast was usually accompanied by a
    moral lesson.

capricious
    Given to sudden and unaccountable changes
    of mood or behaviour.

irrevocably
    In a way that cannot be changed, reversed,
    or recovered.

impedance
    The effective resistance of an electric
    circuit or component to alternating
    current, arising from the combined effects
    of ohmic resistance and reactance.

shoot the breeze
shoot the bull
    [#american informal]

    Have a casual conversation.

novocaine
procaine
    [#dentistry]

    A local anesthetic drug of the amino ester
    group.

    It is used primarily to reduce the pain of
    intramuscular injection of penicillin, and
    it is also used in dentistry.

    Owing to the ubiquity of the trade name
    Novocain, in some regions, procaine is
    referred to generically as novocaine.

i18n
Internationalization
I - eighteen letters -N
    Is the process of planning and
    implementing products and services so that
    they can easily be adapted to specific
    local languages and cultures, a process
    called localization.

exuberant
    Full of energy, excitement, and
    cheerfulness.

catastrophe

impertinence
    Lack of respect; rudeness.

Rudeness
    A display of disrespect by not complying
    with the social norms or etiquette of a
    group or culture.

    These norms have been established as the
    essential boundaries of normally accepted
    behavior.

invocation
invoking
    The action of invoking someone or
    something.

    Yes one uses a 'c', the other 'k'.

Zygosity
    The degree to which both copies of a
    chromosome or gene have the same genetic
    sequence.

    In other words, it is the degree of
    similarity of the alleles in an organism.

    Most eukaryotes have two matching sets of
    chromosomes; that is, they are diploid.

Heterozygosity

inbreeding coefficient

Veneration
veneration of saints
    The act of honoring a saint, a person who
    has been identified as having a high
    degree of sanctity or holiness.

    Angels are shown similar veneration in
    many religions.

Reverence
    [Emotion]

    A feeling or attitude of deep respect
    tinged with awe; veneration.

    The word "reverence" in the modern day is
    often used in relationship with religion.

    This is because religion often stimulates
    the emotion through recognition of God,
    the supernatural, and the ineffable.

reverential
    Of the nature of, due to, or characterized
    by reverence.

awe
    A feeling of reverential respect mixed
    with fear or wonder.

dirge
    A lament for the dead, especially one
    forming part of a funeral rite.

inasmuch
    To the extent that; in so far as.

tetrarch
    (in the Roman Empire) the governor of one
    of four divisions of a country or
    province.

Arable
Arable land
    (of land) used or suitable for growing
    crops.

furlough
    A furlough is a temporary leave of
    employees due to special needs of a
    company or employer, which may be due to
    economic conditions at the specific
    employer or in the economy as a whole.

heckling
heckler
    A heckler is a person who harasses and
    tries to disconcert others with questions,
    challenges, or gibes.

    Hecklers are often known to shout
    disparaging comments at a performance or
    event, or to interrupt set-piece speeches,
    with the intent of disturbing performers
    and/or participants.

concision
    Using only the words necessary to convey
    an idea.

    It aims to enhance communication by
    eliminating redundancy without omitting
    important information.

    Concision has been described as one of the
    elementary principles of writing.

    The related concept of succinctness is the
    opposite of verbosity.

generality
    A statement or principle having general
    rather than specific validity or force.

dorsal
    Of, on, or relating to the upper side or
    back of an animal, plant, or organ.

scandalous
    Causing general public outrage by a
    perceived offence against morality or law.

cachier

plucky
    Having or showing determined courage in
    the face of difficulties.

Warez
    Pirated software distributed via the
    Internet.

recursive backtracking
Backtracking
    A general algorithm for finding all
    solutions to some computational problems,
    notably constraint satisfaction problems,
    that incrementally builds candidates to
    the solutions, and abandons a candidate as
    soon as it determines that the candidate
    cannot possibly be completed to a valid
    solution.

    Backtracking is an algorithmic-technique
    for solving problems recursively by trying
    to build a solution incrementally, one
    piece at a time, removing those solutions
    that fail to satisfy the constraints of
    the problem at any point of time (by time,
    here, is referred to the time elapsed till
    reaching any level of the search tree).

brisk walk

commemorate
commemorated by
    Recall and show respect for (someone or
    something).

bookish
    (of a person or way of life) devoted to
    reading and studying.

receivership
    A company goes into receivership when an
    independent and suitably qualified person
    (the receiver) is appointed by a secured
    creditor, or in special circumstances by
    the court, to take control of some or all

bamboozle
    cheat or fool.

aforementioned
    Denoting a thing or person previously
    mentioned.

comiserating
    Express or feel sympathy or pity;
    sympathize.

ImageNet moment
    Generally used to refer to the success of
    deep learning in the ILSVRC 2012
    competition, which used the Imagenet
    dataset.

Semantic mapping
    A strategy for graphically representing
    concepts.

    A semantic word map allows students to
    conceptually explore their knowledge of a
    new word by mapping it with other related
    words or phrases similar in meaning to the
    new word.

convalescent
convalescence
    The gradual recovery of health and
    strength after illness or injury.

    It refers to the later stage of an
    infectious disease or illness when the
    patient recovers and returns to previous
    health, but may continue to be a source of
    infection to others even if feeling
    better.

convalescent plasma
    The use of convalescent plasma is not a
    new concept.

    By giving patients plasma or serum from
    patients who have developed antibodies to
    a particular virus or bacteria, an
    infected patient is given a massive boost
    to their adaptive immune system, which
    confers passive immunity.

    It has been used since the 1800s.

rambunctious
    Uncontrollably exuberant; boisterous.

teleprinter
teletypewriter
Teletype
TTY
    An electromechanical device that can be
    used to send and receive typed messages
    through various communications channels,
    in both point-to-point and point-to-
    multipoint configurations.

representative study
representative sample
    A subset of a population that seeks to
    accurately reflect the characteristics of
    the larger group.

    For example, a classroom of 30 students
    with 15 males and 15 females, could
    generate a representative sample that
    might include six students: three males
    and three females.

prophylaxis
    Treatment given or action taken to prevent
    disease.

vindicated
    Clear of blame or suspicion.

fungible
    (of goods contracted for without an
    individual specimen being specified) able
    to replace or be replaced by another
    identical item; mutually interchangeable.

Vigil
    A vigil, from the Latin vigilia meaning
    wakefulness, is a period of purposeful
    sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional
    watching, or an observance.

    The Italian word vigilia has become
    generalized in this sense and means "eve".

    Example:
    - Radioactive Man keeps a lonely vigil.

ancillary
    Providing necessary support to the primary
    activities or operation of an
    organization, system, etc.

quorum
    The minimum number of members of a
    deliberative assembly (a body that uses
    parliamentary procedure, such as a
    legislature) necessary to conduct the
    business of that group.

absolved
    Declare (someone) free from guilt,
    obligation, or punishment.

morbidly
    (with reference to a disturbing or
    unpleasant interest or activity) in an
    abnormal and unhealthy manner.

pistachio
    A member of the cashew family, is a small
    tree originating from Central Asia and the
    Middle East.

    The tree produces seeds that are widely
    consumed as food.

    Pistacia vera often is confused with other
    species in the genus Pistacia that are
    also known as pistachio.

withhold
    Refuse to give (something that is due to
    or is desired by another).

praxis
    Practice, as distinguished from theory.

narcissist
    A person who has an excessive interest in
    or admiration of themselves.

conciliatory
    Intended or likely to placate or pacify.

placate
    Make (someone) less angry or hostile.

Frequency Bias
Frequency Bias Illusion
The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon
    The phenomenon where something you
    recently learned suddenly appears
    'everywhere'.

    The seeming appearance of a newly-learned
    (or paid attention to) concept in
    unexpected places.

comparative measure
comparative measurement
sighting
    A way of measuring the size of what you
    see and using those measurements to draw a
    larger or smaller image of the same.

Direct measurement
    Set up your easel in such a way that your
    drawing of the figure is literally the
    same size as the model in your field of
    view.

easel
    A wooden frame for holding an artist's
    work while it is being painted or drawn.

    Example:
    - Grandma's easel that was used at Josh
      and Hayley's wedding.

remiss
    Lacking care or attention to duty;
    negligent.

hellacious
    Very great, bad, or overwhelming.

relent
relented
    abandon or mitigate a severe or harsh
    attitude, especially by finally yielding
    to a request.

incessantly
    Without interruption; constantly.

LARP
larping
live action role-playing game
    A form of role-playing game where the
    participants in real life physically
    portray their characters.

    The players pursue goals within a
    fictional setting represented by the real
    world while interacting with each other in
    character.

Obsolescence
    The process of becoming obsolete or
    outdated and no longer used.

bereft
    Archaic past participle of bereave.

provisioning
    [telecommunication]

    Involves the process of preparing and
    equipping a network to allow it to provide
    new services to its users.

white-label product
    A product or service produced by one
    company (the producer) that other
    companies (the marketers) rebrand to make
    it appear as if they had made it.

remit
    The task or area of activity officially
    assigned to an individual or organization.

epistemology
    The branch of philosophy concerned with
    the theory of knowledge.

    Epistemology is the study of the nature of
    knowledge, justification, and the
    rationality of belief.

arduous
    Involving or requiring strenuous effort;
    difficult and tiring.

embolism
    The lodging of an embolus, a blockage-
    causing piece of material, inside a blood
    vessel.

    The embolus may be a blood clot
    (thrombus), a fat globule (fat embolism),
    a bubble of air or other gas (gas
    embolism), or foreign material.

rapport
    A friendly, harmonious relationship
    especially : a relationship characterized
    by agreement, mutual understanding, or
    empathy that makes communication possible
    or easy.

kidology
    The art or practice of deliberately
    deceiving or teasing people.

diegesis
    A style of fiction storytelling that
    presents an interior view of a world in
    which: Details about the world itself and
    the experiences of its characters are
    revealed explicitly through narrative.

    The story is told or recounted, as opposed
    to shown or enacted.

proclivity
    A tendency to choose or do something
    regularly; an inclination or
    predisposition towards a particular thing.

suffused
    Gradually spread through or over.

subtext
    An underlying and often distinct theme in
    a piece of writing or conversation.

    Any content of a creative work which is
    not announced explicitly by the characters
    or author, but is implicit or becomes
    something understood by the observer of
    the work as the production unfolds.

snark
    noun
    ----
    An imaginary animal (used typically with
    reference to a task or goal that is
    elusive or impossible to achieve).
    "pinning down the middle classes is like
    the hunting of the snark"

    verb
    ----
    make snide and sharply critical comments.
    "they even snark about her family
    background"

emblematic
    serving as a symbol of a particular
    quality or concept; symbolic.

    "this case is emblematic of a larger
    problem"

vindicating
    clear (someone) of blame or suspicion.
    "hospital staff were vindicated by the inquest verdict"

haughty
    Arrogantly superior and disdainful.

defraud
    Illegally obtain money from (someone) by
    deception.

laconic
    (of a person, speech, or style of writing)
    using very few words.

    "his laconic reply suggested a lack of
    interest in the topic"

curt
    Rudely brief in speech or abrupt in
    manner.

    Brief; concise; terse; laconic. short;
    shortened.

    Example:
        "She can be a bit curt."

ingress
    The action or fact of going in or
    entering; the capacity or right of
    entrance.

reify
refies
reification
    Make (something abstract) more concrete or
    real.

    A red rose may be a reification of the
    concept of love.

    "The following exchange reifies freedom
    and stability..."

burgeoning
    Begin to grow or increase rapidly;
    flourish.

amenable
    (of a person) open and responsive to
    suggestion; easily persuaded or
    controlled.

inscrutable
    Impossible to understand or interpret.

animism
    The belief that objects, places and
    creatures all possess a distinct spiritual
    essence.

    Potentially, animism perceives all
    thingsanimals, plants, rocks, rivers,
    weather systems, human handiwork and
    perhaps even words as animated and alive.

pretence
    An attempt to make something that is not
    the case appear true.

vainglory
    Excessive pride in oneself or one's
    achievements; excessive vanity.

facetiously
    Not meant to be taken seriously or
    literally: a facetious remark. amusing;
    humorous. lacking serious intent;
    concerned with something nonessential,
    amusing, or frivolous: a facetious person.

oligarchs
    A form of power structure in which power
    rests with a small number of people.

cinder block
    Fabricated of concrete and coal cinders.

    Concrete block is produced by steel, wood,
    and cement.

    Cinder blocks are lighter than concrete
    blocks.

    A concrete block contains stone or sand
    which makes it heavier.

preternaturally
    The preternatural is that which appears
    outside or beside the natural.

    It is "suspended between the mundane and
    the miraculous".

maudlin
    Self-pityingly or tearfully sentimental,
    often through drunkenness.

moribund
    (of a person)

    At the point of death.

rumination
    A deep or considered thought about
    something.

duly
    In accordance with what is required or
    appropriate; following proper procedure or
    arrangement.

cognitive dissonance
    The state of having inconsistent thoughts,
    beliefs, or attitudes, especially as
    relating to behavioural decisions and
    attitude change.

onosecond
    The horrible moment when you realise that
    you have accidentally done something very
    slightly wrong which has very bad (usually
    embarassing) implications for you.

    This is typically the moment of
    realisation that you just sent a dirty
    text message to a close member of family,
    typically your mother, rather than the
    intended recipient.

sinewy
    Consisting of or resembling sinews.

maw
    The jaws or throat of a voracious animal.

ordinance
    An authoritative order.

aegis
    The protection, backing, or support of a
    particular person or organization.

germane
    Relevant to a subject under consideration.

    Example:
    "that is not germane to our theme"

lurid
    Very vivid in color, especially so as to
    create an unpleasantly harsh or unnatural
    effect.

laundry list
    A long or exhaustive list of people or
    things.

guile
    Sly or cunning intelligence.

haughtiness
    The appearance or quality of being
    arrogantly superior and disdainful.

denigrate
    Criticize unfairly; disparage.

missiological
    Missiology is the area of practical
    theology that investigates the mandate,
    message, and mission of the Christian
    church, especially the nature of
    missionary work.

Gematria
    An alphanumeric code of assigning a
    numerical value to a name, word or phrase
    based on its letters.

    A single word can yield multiple values
    depending on the cipher used.

    Gematria originated as an Assyro-
    Babylonian-Greek system of alphanumeric
    code or cipher that was later adopted into
    Jewish culture.

calisthenics
    A form of exercise consisting of a variety
    of movements that exercise large muscle
    groups (gross motor movements), such as
    running, standing, grasping, pushing, etc.

    These exercises are often performed
    rhythmically and with minimal equipment,
    as bodyweight exercises.

abridged
    (of a piece of writing) having been
    shortened.

Maximalism
    In the arts, maximalism, a reaction
    against minimalism, is an aesthetic of
    excess.

    The philosophy can be summarized as "more
    is more", contrasting with the minimalist
    motto "less is more".

erstwhile
former

precarity
precariousness
    A precarious existence, lacking in
    predictability, job security, material or
    psychological welfare.

    The social class defined by this condition
    has been termed the precariat.

    The state of having insecure employment or
    income.

precariat
    [#sociology and economics]

    The social class defined by the condition
    of having precarity.

    A neologism for a social class formed by
    people suffering from precarity, which is
    a condition of existence without
    predictability or security, affecting
    material or psychological welfare.

    The term is a portmanteau obtained by
    merging precarious with proletariat.

proletariat
    Working-class people regarded collectively
    (often used with reference to Marxism).
    "the growth of the industrial proletariat"

formal knowledge
codified knowledge
explicit knowledge

tacit knowledge
implicit knowledge
    (as opposed to formal, codified or
    explicit knowledge)

    The kind of knowledge that is difficult to
    transfer to another person by means of
    writing it down or verbalizing it.

pared down
    To reduce the size of something by cutting
    or shaving off its outer layers; trim
    something: I pared down the tiles so that
    they would fit snugly together.

discombobulate
    Disconcert or confuse (someone).

contemplative

macabre
    Disturbing because concerned with or
    causing a fear of death.

Parisian
    A person who was born in, or is a citizen
    or inhabitant of, Paris, France

manifesto
    A public declaration of policy and aims,
    especially one issued before an election
    by a political party or candidate.

senescence
    The condition or process of deterioration
    with age.

disparity
    A great difference.

regale
    Entertain or amuse (someone) with talk.

steward
    A person employed to look after the
    passengers on a ship, aircraft, or train.

sommelier
    A wine waiter/steward.

adjudicator
    Someone who presides, judges, and
    arbitrates during a formal dispute or
    competition.

    They have numerous purposes, including
    preliminary legal judgments, to determine
    applicant eligibility, or to assess
    contenders' performance in competitions.

    A person who adjudicates.

deign
    Do something that one considers to be
    beneath one's dignity.

protracted
    Lasting for a long time or longer than
    expected or usual.

pendantic
overscrupulous
    Excessively scrupulous.

pernickety
    Placing too much emphasis on trivial or
    minor details; fussy.

    Too pedantic.

pragmatic
    Dealing with things sensibly and
    realistically in a way that is based on
    practical rather than theoretical
    considerations.

Pragmatics
    [field of study]

    A subfield of linguistics and semiotics
    that studies the ways in which context
    contributes to meaning.

    Pragmatics encompasses speech act theory,
    conversational implicature, talk in
    interaction and other approaches to
    language behavior in philosophy,
    sociology, linguistics and anthropology

didactic
    Intended to teach, particularly in having
    moral instruction as an ulterior motive.

hitherto
    Until now or until the point in time under
    discussion.

    "revealed hitherto unknown buildings".

usurper
    A usurper is an illegitimate or
    controversial claimant to power, often but
    not always in a monarchy.

    In other words, a person who takes the
    power of a country, city, or established
    region for themselves, without any formal
    or legal right to claim it as their own.

ardent
    Very enthusiastic or passionate.

avarice
    Extreme greed for wealth or material gain.

Teleology
finality
    A reason or explanation for something as a
    function of its end, purpose, or goal.

    A purpose that is imposed by a human use,
    such as that of a fork, is called
    extrinsic.

telos
    A term used by philosopher Aristotle to
    refer to the full potential or inherent
    purpose or objective of a person or thing,
    similar to the notion of an 'end goal' or
    'raison d'être'.

    Moreover, it can be understood as the
    "supreme end of man's endeavour."

    The root of the modern term 'teleology',
    the study of purposiveness or of objects
    with a view to their aims, purposes, or
    intentions.

    Teleology is central in Aristotle's work
    on biology and in his theory of causes.

Natural teleology
    Common in classical philosophy, though
    controversial today.

    Contends that natural entities also have
    intrinsic purposes, irrespective of human
    use or opinion.

    For instance, Aristotle claimed that an
    acorn's intrinsic telos is to become a
    fully grown oak tree.

relegate
    Assign an inferior rank or position to.

delegate
    Entrust (a task or responsibility) to
    another person, typically one who is less
    senior than oneself.

stoic
    A person who can endure pain or hardship
    without showing their feelings or
    complaining.

Ontology
    The philosophical study of being.

    More broadly, it studies concepts that
    directly relate to being, in particular
    becoming, existence, reality, as well as
    the basic categories of being and their
    relations.

emancipation
    The fact or process of being set free from
    legal, social, or political restrictions;
    liberation.

petroglyph
    A rock carving, especially a prehistoric
    one.

verdant
    (of countryside) green with grass or other
    rich vegetation.

    Of the bright green colour of lush grass.

wrought
    (of metals) beaten out or shaped by
    hammering.

chevron
    A V-shaped line or stripe, especially one
    on the sleeve of a uniform indicating rank
    or length of service.

won't
    Will not.

phrenology
    A process that involves observing and/or
    feeling the skull to determine an
    individual's psychological attributes.

    Franz Joseph Gall believed that the brain
    was made up of 27 individual organs that
    determined personality, the first 19 of
    these 'organs' he believed to exist in
    other animal species.

melancholic
    Feeling or expressing pensive sadness.

anaphora
    [grammar]

    The use of a word referring back to a word
    used earlier in a text or conversation, to
    avoid repetition, for example the pronouns
    he, she, it, and they and the verb do in I
    like it and so do they.

    [rhetoric]

    An anaphora is a rhetorical device that
    consists of repeating a sequence of words
    at the beginnings of neighboring clauses,
    thereby lending them emphasis.

    In contrast:
    - epistrophe

    Related:
    - symploce

epistrophe
    [rhetoric]

    Repeating words at the clauses' ends.

symploce
    [rhetoric]

    The combination of anaphora and
    epistrophe.

anaphoric
    Of or relating to anaphora an anaphoric
    usage especially : being a word or phrase
    that takes its reference from another word
    or phrase and especially from a preceding
    word or phrase  compare cataphoric.

tacit
    Understood or implied without being
    stated.

disconcerting
    Causing one to feel unsettled.

militaristic
    The belief or the desire of a government
    or a people that a state should maintain a
    strong military capability and to use it
    aggressively to expand national interests
    and/or values.

luddite
    A person opposed to new technology or ways
    of working.

beleaguered
    Lay siege to.

coalescing
    Come together to form one mass or whole.

duress
    Threats, violence, constraints, or other
    action used to coerce someone into doing
    something against their will or better
    judgement.

    "under duress"

unabashedly
    Without embarrassment or shame.

embellished
    Make (something) more attractive by the
    addition of decorative details or
    features.

antithesis
    A person or thing that is the direct
    opposite of someone or something else.

    Startups where you expect to not know what
    you will be working on that day -- that's
    the antithesis of the way I think since
    I'm always planning for the future -- like
    5 - 10 years in the future,
    programming-wise.

senpai
    An upperclassman who mentors an
    underclassman, or kohai.

    This term is used most often in English in
    reference to anime and manga and
    originates from Japanese 先輩, "earlier
    colleague".

    Used more broadly to mean "teacher" or
    "master."

abhorance
    A feeling of revulsion; disgusted
    loathing.

commend
    To present or represent as being worthy of
    regard, confidence, kindness, etc.

    To give in charge; entrust.

    To express a good opinion of; praise.

bigot
bigotry
    Intolerance toward those who hold
    different opinions from oneself.

anachronnistic
    Belonging to a period other than that
    being portrayed.

dysplastic
    Exhibiting dysplasia; containing abnormal
    cells or showing abnormal development.

remiss
    Lacking care or attention to duty;
    negligent.

Eureka
    An interjection used to celebrate a
    discovery or invention.

    It is a transliteration of an exclamation
    attributed to Ancient Greek mathematician
    and inventor Archimedes.

abominable
    Causing moral revulsion.

contrapositive
contrapositively
    A proposition or theorem formed by
    contradicting both the subject and
    predicate or both the hypothesis and
    conclusion of a given proposition or
    theorem and interchanging them:

    "if not-B then not-A" is the
    contrapositive of "if A then B".

belie
belies
    (of an appearance) fail to give a true
    impression of (something).

    "it belies...".

obstinance
    The trait of being difficult to handle or
    overcome.

    - mulishness,
    - obstinacy,
    - stubbornness,
    - intractability,
    - intractableness

    The trait of being hard to influence or
    control.

    Resolute adherence to your own ideas or desires.

potter
puttering
    Occupy oneself in a desultory but pleasant
    way.

astonishing
    Extremely surprising or impressive;
    amazing.

laconic
    Using very few words.

misanthropic
    Having or showing a dislike of other
    people; unsociable.

avarice
    Extreme greed for wealth or material gain.

incensed
    Very angry; enraged.

contrivances
    The use of skill to create or bring about
    something, especially with a consequent
    effect of artificiality.

    A device, especially in literary or
    artistic composition, which gives a sense
    of artificiality.

presumptuous
    When you say someone is presumptuous, you
    mean that the person is overconfident and
    is acting rudely or inappropriately.

    A presumptuous person takes liberties.

    Full of, characterized by, or showing
    presumption or readiness to presume in
    conduct or thought, as by saying or doing
    something without right or permission.
    unwarrantedly or impertinently bold;
    forward.

impertinent
    Not showing proper respect; rude.

profligacy
    Reckless extravagance or wastefulness in
    the use of resources.

dissolute
    Lax in morals; licentious.

    "dissolute behaviour".

cloistered

cloister
    An enclosed garden, usually surrounded by
    covered walkways.

    Because such spaces are often featured in
    buildings that house religious orders,
    cloister can be used to mean "monastery"
    or "convent."

prostrate
    Defenseless.

    "is prostrate".

circcuavallation
    A defensive wall of a castle or walled
    city.

escalade
escalade assault
    The act of scaling defensive walls or
    ramparts with the aid of ladders, and was
    a prominent feature of sieges in ancient
    and medieval warfare.

    It was one of the most direct options
    available for attacking a fortification,
    but was also one of the most dangerous.

    Escalade consisted simply of soldiers
    advancing to the base of a wall, setting
    ladders, and climbing to engage the
    defending forces.

    This would generally be conducted in the
    face of arrow fire from the battlements,
    and the defenders would naturally attempt
    to push ladders away from the wall.

    Heated or incendiary substances such as
    boiling water, heated sand, and pitch-
    coated missiles were sometimes poured on
    attacking soldiers.

edifice
    A large, imposing building.

temperament
    A person's or animal's nature, especially
    as it permanently affects their behaviour.

repudiate
    Refuse to accept or be associated with.

unflappability
    Persistently calm, whether when facing
    difficulties or experiencing success; not
    easily upset or excited.

archetypal
prototypal
archetypical
prototypical
    An original type, form, or instance
    serving as a basis or standard.

Mildew
    A surface fungi that can easily be
    identified as a patch of gray or even
    white fungus that is lying on the surface
    of a moist area.

    Mildew is easily treated with a store
    bought cleaner and a scrubbing brush.

    Mold, on the other hand, can be black or
    green and is often the result of a much
    larger infestation.

ruse
    An action intended to deceive someone; a
    trick.

despise
    Feel contempt or a deep repugnance for.

contempt
    The feeling that a person or a thing is
    worthless or beneath consideration.

repugnance
    Intense disgust.

convocation
    A large formal assembly of people.

adorn
    Make more beautiful or attractive.

Martial law
    Martial law is the imposition of direct
    military control of normal civil functions
    or suspension of civil law by a
    government, especially in response to a
    temporary emergency where civil forces are
    overwhelmed, or in an occupied territory.

allegory
    A story, poem, or picture that can be
    interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning,
    typically a moral or political one.

    "Pilgrim's Progress is an allegory of the
    spiritual journey"

topical
    (of a subject) of immediate relevance,
    interest, or importance owing to its
    relation to current events.

applicability
    The quality of being relevant or
    appropriate.

extenuating
    Making forgivable.

    The adjective extenuating is unusual
    because it's almost always used with the
    word circumstances; the phrase extenuating
    circumstances describes the specific
    reasons that excuse or justify someone's
    actions.

    (of a factor or situation) serving to
    lessen the seriousness of an offence.

    "extenuating circumstances".

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?smoothing=3&corpus=26&year_end=2019&content=extenuating+%2A&year_start=1800&direct_url=t2%3B%2Cextenuating%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bextenuating%20circumstances%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20circumstance%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20or%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20his%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20and%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20their%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20factors%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20plea%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20nothing%3B%2Cc0#t2%3B%2Cextenuating%20*%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bextenuating%20circumstances%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20circumstance%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20or%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20his%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20and%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20their%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20factors%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20plea%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bextenuating%20nothing%3B%2Cc0

incarceration
    The state of being confined in prison;
    imprisonment.

inadmissible
    (especially of evidence in court) not
    accepted as valid.

petulent
    (of a person or their manner) childishly
    sulky or bad-tempered.

schlepping
    Haul or carry (something heavy or
    awkward).

    (of a person) go or move reluctantly or
    with effort.

confer
    Have discussions; exchange opinions.

facsimile
    "fak-similee"

    An exact copy, especially of written or
    printed material.

apprehensive
    Anxious or fearful that something bad or
    unpleasant will happen.

duress
    Threats, violence, constraints, or other
    action used to coerce someone into doing
    something against their will or better
    judgement.

    "admit ones true feelings while under
    extreme duress"

Adage
    An adage is a concise, memorable, and
    usually philosophical aphorism that
    communicates an important truth derived
    from experience, custom, or both, and that
    many people consider true and credible
    because of its longeval tradition, i.e.
    being handed down generation to
    generation, or memetic replication.

hubris
    Excessive pride or self-confidence.

    "height of hubris".

Subject-matter expert
SME
    A subject-matter expert is a person who is
    an authority in a particular area or
    topic.

    The term is used when developing materials
    about a topic, and expertise on the topic
    is needed by the personnel developing the
    material.

    For example, tests are often created by a
    team of psychometricians and a team of
    SMEs.

trounced
    Defeat heavily in a contest.

emergent

emergence

belie
belying
    Contradict, belie, negate -- (be in
    contradiction with).

irrevocably
    In a way that cannot be changed, reversed,
    or recovered.

    'my life changed irrevocably in an
    instant'

oxford comma
    [English language punctuation]

    "a, b, and c"

    A serial comma, or series comma, is a
    comma placed immediately after the
    penultimate term in a series of three or
    more terms.

    For example, a list of three countries
    might be punctuated either as "France,
    Italy and Spain" or "France, Italy, and
    Spain"

asshattery
    Calling someone an asshat is generally a
    way to insult them for being rude and
    self-centered.

    The obnoxious actions made by an asshat,
    which usually involve angering or
    disregarding other people, are known as
    asshattery.

Manatee
    Large, fully aquatic, mostly herbivorous
    marine mammals sometimes known as sea
    cows.

    There are three accepted living species of
    Trichechidae, representing three of the
    four living species in the order Sirenia:
    the Amazonian manatee, the West Indian
    manatee, and the West African manatee.

hearken
    Listen.

unfalsifiable
    Confidently asserting that a theory or
    hypothesis is true or false even though
    the theory or hypothesis cannot possibly
    be contradicted by an observation or the
    outcome of any physical experiment,
    usually without strong evidence or good
    reasons.

unrequited
    (of a feeling, especially love) not
    returned.

husbandry
    The care, cultivation, and breeding of
    crops and animals.

    - farm management,
    - farming,
    - agriculture,
    - land management,
    - agronomy,
    - agronomics,
    - agribusiness,
    - cultivation,
    - tillage,
    - animal husbandry

ream
    500 (formally, 480) sheets of paper.

    Examples:
    - reams of text
    - reams of paper

isomorphous
isomorphic
    Having similar appearance but genetically
    different.

    However we should not forget that the
    relationships between words are isomorphic
    to the relations between things - that
    isomorphism is why language works.

vassal
    A holder of land by feudal tenure on
    conditions of homage and allegiance.

equiprobable
    (of two or more things) equally likely to
    occur; having equal probability.

lackadaisical
    Lacking enthusiasm and determination;
    carelessly lazy.

placate
placated
    Make (someone) less angry or hostile.

propitiate
    Win or regain the favour of (a god,
    spirit, or person) by doing something that
    pleases them.

tranquillize
    [literary]

    Make tranquil.

    "joys that tranquillize the mind".

literary
    Concerning the writing, study, or content
    of literature, especially of the kind
    valued for quality of form.

lullaby
cradle song
    A soothing song or piece of music that is
    usually played for children.

    The purposes of lullabies vary.

    In some societies they are used to pass
    down cultural knowledge or tradition.

brimming
    Be full to the point of overflowing.

belligerent
    An individual, group, country, or other
    entity that acts in a hostile manner, such
    as engaging in combat.

    Belligerent comes from Latin, literally
    meaning "one who wages war".

rescinded
    Revoke, cancel or repeal.

countenance
    A person's face or facial expression.

redressed
    Remedy or set right (an undesirable or
    unfair situation).

paragon
    Someone or something that is the very
    best.

    The English noun paragon comes from the
    Italian word paragone, which is a
    touchstone, a black stone that is used to
    tell the quality of gold.

    You rub the gold on the touchstone and you
    can find out how good the gold is.

Stratification
    A system or formation of layers, classes,
    or categories.

    Stratification is used to describe a
    particular way of arranging seeds while
    planting, as well as the geological layers
    of rocks.

ravishing
    delightful; entrancing.

    "ravishing resourcefulness".

nefarious

unabashed
    Not embarrassed, disconcerted, or ashamed.

bootlegging
    The illegal manufacture, distribution, or
    sale of goods, especially alcohol or
    recordings.

trafficking
    The act of recruiting, transporting,
    transferring, harbouring or receiving a
    person; By means of e.g. coercion,
    deception or abuse of vulnerability; For
    the purpose of exploitation, such as
    sexual exploitation, slavery and forced
    labour, among others.

conspiratorial
    Relating to or suggestive of a secret plan
    made by a group of people to do something
    unlawful or harmful.

emancipate
    Set free, especially from legal, social,
    or political restrictions.

maxim
    A succinct formulation of a principle,
    rule, or basic truth about life.

    Usually clever, maxims are like great
    sayings everybody knows.

    A maxim sums up a fundamental principle or
    truth about something in a way that
    captures the imagination and gets
    repeated.

apocryphal
    (of a story or statement) of doubtful
    authenticity, although widely circulated
    as being true.

    "an apocryphal story about a former
    president"

    of or belonging to the Apocrypha.
    "the apocryphal Gospel of Thomas"

capacious
    Having a lot of space inside; roomy.

incredulous
    (of a person or their manner) unwilling or
    unable to believe something.

    "Be not incredulous to the fear of the
    Lord: and come not to him with a double
    heart."

poignant
    Evoking a keen sense of sadness or regret.

poignancy
    the quality of evoking a keen sense of
    sadness or regret; pathos.

    'the pregnancy has a special poignancy for
    her family'

pathos
    A quality that evokes pity or sadness.

extant
    (especially of a document) still in
    existence; surviving.

vocation
    A strong feeling of suitability for a
    particular career or occupation.

    'not all of us have a vocation to be
    nurses or doctors'

    synonyms:
    - calling, life's work, mission, purpose,
      function, position, niche, profession,
      occupation, career, job, day job, work,
      employment, pursuit, trade, craft,
      business, line, line of work,
      speciality, specialty, province, sphere,
      walk of life, métier, line of country,
      game, thing, bag, racket

trepidation
    A feeling of fear or anxiety about
    something that may happen.

inexorably
inexorable
    Impossible to stop or prevent.

    "I'm inexorably unable to work on NLP due
    to the NZ job market."

desecration
    The act of depriving something of its
    sacred character, or the disrespectful,
    contemptuous, or destructive treatment of
    that which is held to be sacred or holy by
    a group or individual.

profane
    Not relating to that which is sacred or
    religious; secular.

profanation
    The act or an instance of profaning.

contemptuous
    Showing contempt; scornful.

contempt
    The feeling that a person or a thing is
    worthless or beneath consideration.

minutiae
    The small, precise, or trivial details of
    something.

    "the minutiae of everyday life"

joie de vivre
    [French phrase]

    Often used in English to express a
    cheerful enjoyment of life; an exultation
    of spirit.

    It "can be a joy of conversation, joy of
    eating, joy of anything one might do And
    joie de vivre may be seen as a joy of
    everything, a comprehensive joy, a
    philosophy of life, a Weltanschauung.

whimsy
    Playfully quaint or fanciful behaviour or
    humour.

    "the film is an awkward blend of whimsy
    and moralizing"

compendium
    A collection of concise but detailed
    information about a particular subject,
    especially in a book or other publication.

    "an invaluable compendium of useful
    information about language"

slipstream
    A slipstream is a region behind a moving
    object in which a wake of fluid is moving
    at velocities comparable to the moving
    object, relative to the ambient fluid
    through which the object is moving.

    The term slipstream also applies to the
    similar region adjacent to an object with
    a fluid moving around it.

postmodernism
    A broad movement that developed in the
    mid- to late 20th century across
    philosophy, the arts, architecture, and
    criticism, marking a departure from
    modernism. The term has been more
    generally applied to describe a historical
    era said to follow after modernity and the
    tendencies of this era.

hyperreality
    [semiotics]
    [postmodernism]

    An inability of consciousness to
    distinguish reality from a simulation of
    reality, especially in technologically
    advanced postmodern societies.

simulacra and simulation
    News may be a simulation.
    The reaction is the simulacra.

simulacra
simulacrum
    The reaction from the simulation.

    An image or representation of someone or
    something.
    "a small-scale simulacrum of a skyscraper"

    An unsatisfactory imitation or substitute.
    "a bland simulacrum of American soul
    music"

atrophied
    (of body tissue or an organ) wasted away
    or rudimentary.

toponym
    A place name, especially one derived from
    a topographical feature.

anadiplosis
    v +/"Anadiplosis" "$HOME/Calibre Library/Mark Forsyth/The Elements of Eloquence (6)/The Elements of Eloquence - Mark Forsyth.txt"

Polyptoton
    The stylistic scheme in which words
    derived from the same root are repeated.

    A related stylistic device is
    antanaclasis, in which the same word is
    repeated, but each time with a different
    sense.

Merism
    [linguistic phenomenon]

    A combination of two contrasting parts of
    the whole refer to the whole.

    For example, in order to say that someone
    "searched everywhere", one could use the
    merism "searched high and low"

Aposiopesis
    [figure of speech]

    A sentence is deliberately broken off and
    left unfinished, the ending to be supplied
    by the imagination, giving an impression
    of unwillingness or inability to continue.

    An example would be the threat "Get out,
    or else!"

Diacope
    A rhetorical term meaning repetition of a
    word or phrase with one or two intervening
    words. It derives from a Greek word
    meaning "cut in two".

    Diacope () is a rhetorical term meaning
    repetition of a word or phrase with one or
    two intervening words. It derives from a
    Greek word meaning "cut in two".

    A verbal sandwich: a word or phrase is
    repeated after a brief interruption.

    You take two Bonds and stuff James in the
    middle.

    Bingo.

    You have a great line.

    Or if you like you can take two burns and
    stuff a baby in the middle, and you've got
    a political slogan and disco hit: burn,
    baby, burn ("Disco Inferno").

    If you want to write the greatest line in
    The Godfather Part II, all you need is two

    It was yous with a Fredo, I know as the
    stuffing.

    In fact, you don't even need to use
    diacope at all.

    Diacope has a life of its own and flits,
    like a winged monkey, into places it was
    never meant to be.

    Every child remembers how, in The Wizard
    of Oz, the Wicked Witch of the West14
    cries: "Fly, my pretties, fly!"

Hendiadys

Epistrophe

Tricolon

Epizeuxis

Syllepsis

Isocolon

Enallage

Versification

Zeugma

Chiasmus

Assonance

Catachresis

Litotes

Metonymy

Synecdoche

Epithets

Pleonasm
    v +/"Pleonasm is the use of unneeded words" "$HOME/Calibre Library/Mark Forsyth/The Elements of Eloquence (6)/The Elements of Eloquence - Mark Forsyth.txt"

    The use of unneeded words that are
    superfluous and unnecessary in a sentence
    that doesn't require them.

    It's repeating the same thing again twice,
    and it annoys and irritates people.

    Some cannot see a pleonasm without flying
    into a furious rage.

    But that is rather silly.

    There are three different varieties of
    pleonasm: the tiny, the lazy, and the
    lovely.

Epanalepsis
    Beginning and ending with the same word.

    v +/"John Lennon complained that the song" "$HOME/Calibre Library/Mark Forsyth/The Elements of Eloquence (6)/The Elements of Eloquence - Mark Forsyth.txt"

Hyperbole
    The technical term for exaggeration, and
    even though we have literally thousands of
    English words that mean the same thing,
    hyperbole is one of the few technical
    Greek rhetorical terms that absolutely
    everybody knows.

    That may be because we exaggerate
    constantly.

    The human being is the great embroiderer.

    It's not enough for us to say that we
    waited for ten minutes; we have to wait
    "for ages."

    If I've told you twice, I've told you a
    thousand times.

    If you're rich, you have a ton of money.

    It's enough to make you break down in a
    flood of tears.

adynaton
    v +/"Adynaton" "$HOME/Calibre Library/Mark Forsyth/The Elements of Eloquence (6)/The Elements of Eloquence - Mark Forsyth.txt"

    Before an adynaton will work, pigs will
    fly, Hell will freeze over and the Devil
    will go skiing. You might as well try to
    get blood out of a stone. It's therefore a
    very easy, if very periphrastic, way of
    saying no.

Prolepsis

Congeries

Scesis

Onomaton

Anaphora

Peroration

Horologicon
The Horologicon: A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language
    [Book by Mark Forsyth]

    "Book of Hours"

    - published in 2012

    A non-fiction book by Mark Forsyth.

tumultuous
    Making an uproar or loud, confused noise.

stately
    Impressive or grand in size, appearance,
    or manner.

    "a stately 19th-century mansion".

volition
    The faculty or power of using one's will.

fallible
    Capable of making mistakes or being wrong.

conceit
    In the modern literary criticism, more
    common with genre fiction, conceit often
    means an extended rhetorical device,
    summed up in a short phrase, that refers
    to a situation which either does not
    exist, or exists rarely, but is needed for
    the plot.

distress
    Extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain.

inconsistent
    Not staying the same throughout.

egregious
    Outstandingly bad; shocking.

surreptitiously
    In a way that attempts to avoid notice or
    attention; secretively.

grist
    Grain that is ground to make flour.

    "Any type of text thats been uploaded to
    the internet has likely become grist to
    GPT-3s mighty pattern-matching mill."

unconscionable
    Not right or reasonable.

sublimely
    Completely; in a lofty and exalted manner;

    "awaking in me, sublimely unconscious,
    interest and energy for tackling these
    tasks".

    "sublimely happy".

zenith
    Said: "zee-nith"

    The point on the celestial sphere
    vertically above a given position or
    observer.

    A highest point or state; culmination.

antecedent
    A thing that existed before or logically
    precedes another.

bereft
    Deprived of or lacking (something).

exonerate
exonerated
    (of an official body) absolve (someone)
    from blame for a fault or wrongdoing.

insuperable
    (of a difficulty or obstacle) impossible
    to overcome.

execrable
    Extremely bad or unpleasant.

    "morally execrable".

palpably
    Noticeably or clearly.

affront
    An action or remark that causes outrage or
    offence.

    "an outright affront to".

Balkanize
    Divide (a region or body) into smaller
    mutually hostile states or groups.

posit
positied
    Put forward as fact or as a basis for
    argument.

discrepancy
    An illogical or surprising lack of
    compatibility or similarity between two or
    more facts.

infraction
    A violation or infringement of a law or
    agreement.

retort
    Say something in answer to a remark,
    typically in a sharp, angry, or witty
    manner.

borne
    Past participle of bear (carry).

abject
    (of something bad) experienced or present
    to the maximum degree.

    "abject failure".

trite
    If you say that something such as an idea,
    remark, or story is trite, you mean that
    it is dull and boring because it has been
    said or told too many times.

platitude
    A platitude is a trite, meaningless, or
    prosaic statement, often used as a
    thought-terminating cliché, aimed at
    quelling social, emotional, or cognitive
    unease.

edict
    A command or instruction given by
    someone in authority.

delightful
    Causing delight; charming.

truism
    A statement that is obviously true and
    says nothing new or interesting.

pedagogy
    Teaching method.

    Approach to teaching.

Ranching
Ranch
    A ranch is an area of land, including
    various structures, given primarily to the
    practice of ranching, the practice of
    raising grazing livestock such as cattle
    and sheep most often applies to livestock-
    raising operations in Mexico, the Western
    United States and Western Canada, though
    there are ranches in other areas.

Ranch vs farm
    A farm is a land where a farmer grows
    crops and livestock for dairy products.

    The focus of people working on a farm is
    to keep the soil fertile for growing
    healthy crops.

    A ranch, on the other hand, is a land
    where livestock such as sheep, cattle,
    goats, and pigs are raised.

etude
    An étude (; French: [e.tyd], meaning
    'study') is an instrumental musical
    composition, usually short, of
    considerable difficulty, and designed to
    provide practice material for perfecting a
    particular musical skill. The tradition of
    writing études emerged in the early 19th
    century with the rapidly growing
    popularity of the piano.

stymied

The Art of Fugue
The Art of the Fugue
German: Die Kunst der Fuge)
    [BWV 1080]

    An incomplete musical work of unspecified
    instrumentation by Johann Sebastian Bach
    (16851750). Written in the last decade of
    his life, The Art of Fugue is the
    culmination of Bach's experimentation with
    monothematic instrumental works.

contrapunctus
    The technique of combining two or more
    melodic lines in such a way that they
    establish a harmonic relationship while
    retaining their linear individuality. c. A
    composition or piece that incorporates or
    consists of contrapuntal writing.

whimsical
    Playfully quaint or fanciful, especially
    in an appealing and amusing way.

eminently
    To a notable degree; very.

over-indulgent
    1. To indulge (a desire, craving, or
    habit) to excess: overindulging a fondness
    for cake.

    2. To indulge (a person) excessively:
    overindulges his children. To indulge in
    something to excess.

watershed
    An area or ridge of land that separates
    waters flowing to different rivers,
    basins, or seas.

watershed moment
    A turning point, the exact moment that
    changes the direction of an activity or
    situation.

    A watershed moment is a dividing point,
    from which things will never be the same.

    It is considered momentous, though a
    watershed moment is often recognized in
    hindsight.

pub
public house

anaphoric
anaphora
    The use of an expression whose
    interpretation depends upon another
    expression in context.

witicism
    A witty remark.

raconteur
    A person who tells anecdotes in a skilful
    and amusing way.

bumble
    Move or act in an awkward or confused
    manner.

felicitous
    Well chosen or suited to the
    circumstances.

fecund
    Producing or capable of producing an
    abundance of offspring or new growth;
    fertile.

syllogism
    A kind of logical argument that applies
    deductive reasoning to arrive at a
    conclusion based on two or more
    propositions that are asserted or assumed
    to be true.

    In a form, defined by Aristotle, from the
    combination of a general statement and a
    specific statement, a conclusion is
    deduced.

haiku
    An English language poem written in the
    Japanese poetry style known as haiku.

    The degree to which haiku in English
    resemble classic Japanese haiku varies,
    but many of these poems draw on short,
    concise wording and a reference to nature.

ostensible
    Stated or appearing to be true, but not
    necessarily so.

    "ostensible power".

colleague
    A person with whom one works in a
    profession or business.

apostate
    One who undertakes apostasy.

apostasy
    The abandonment or renunciation of a
    religious or political belief or
    principle.

    The formal disaffiliation from,
    abandonment of, or renunciation of a
    religion by a person.

    It can also be defined within the broader
    context of embracing an opinion that is
    contrary to one's previous religious
    beliefs.

worldview
world-view
    The fundamental cognitive orientation of
    an individual or society encompassing the
    whole of the individual's or society's
    knowledge and point of view.

    Can include:
    - natural philosophy;
        - fundamental,
        - existential, and
        - normative postulates; or
    - themes,
    - values,
    - emotions, and
    - ethics.

bilboes
grillos
    (always plural)

    Iron restraints normally placed on a
    person's ankles.

    They have commonly been used as leg
    shackles to restrain prisoners for
    different purposes until the modern ages.

    Bilboes were also used on slave ships,
    such as the Henrietta Marie.

    According to legend, the device was
    invented in Bilbao, Basque Country within
    Spain, and was imported into England by
    the ships of the Spanish Armada for use on
    prospective English prisoners.

    However, the Oxford English Dictionary
    notes that the term was used in English
    well before then.

oust

parochial
    If you describe someone as parochial, you
    are critical of them because you think
    they are too concerned with their own
    affairs and should be thinking about more
    important things.

parochialism
    The quality of being parochial in your
    attitude.

    Parochialism is the state of mind, whereby
    one focuses on small sections of an issue
    rather than considering its wider context.

    More generally, it consists of being
    narrow in scope.

    In that respect, it is a synonym of
    "provincialism".

    It may, particularly when used
    pejoratively, be contrasted to
    universalism.

    The term insularity (related to an island)
    may be similarly used.

    The term originates from the idea of a
    parish (Late Latin: parochia), one of the
    smaller divisions within many Christian
    churches such as the Roman Catholic,
    Orthodox, and Anglican churches.

austere
    Severe or strict in manner, attitude, or
    appearance.

pentamerous
pentameral
    1. Having five similar parts.
    2. Having flower parts, such as petals,
       sepals, and stamens, in sets of five.

pentamerous flower
    A flower which has 5 petals or in the
    multiple of five.

    Each floral whorl consists of five
    (or a multiple of five) members

whorl
verticil
    An arrangement of leaves, sepals, petals,
    stamens, or carpels that radiate from a
    single point and surround or wrap around
    the stem or stalk.

    A leaf whorl consists of at least three
    elements; a pair of opposite leaves is not
    called a whorl.

inaugurate
    Begin or introduce (a system, policy, or
    period).

    "Inaugurate an era of peace."

chauvinism
    A form of extreme patriotism and
    nationalism, a fervent faith in national
    excellence and glory.

    It is an irrational belief in the
    superiority or dominance of one's own
    group or people, who are seen as strong
    and virtuous, while others are considered
    weak or unworthy.

prissy
    Fussily and excessively respectable.

transient
    A person who is staying or working in a
    place for a short time only.

    A momentary variation in current, voltage,
    or frequency.

impunity
    Exemption from punishment or freedom from
    the injurious consequences of an action.

remanded

garden variety
    Of the usual or ordinary type;
    commonplace.

topical
    (of a subject) of immediate relevance,
    interest, or importance owing to its
    relation to current events.
    - current or to a particular time
      - topical with regard to time is the
        current time.
      - with regard to other things, it refers
        to a (one of the) topic/s of
        something.

    "a popular topical affairs programme"

    Synonyms:
    - contemporary
    - current (but contemporary and current
      are not synonyms)

contemporaneous
    Existing or occurring in the same period
    of time.

    Example:
    - contemporaneous sequels

contemporary
    Living or occurring at the same time.

recalcitrance
recalcitrant
    Obstinately defiant of authority or
    restraint.

    Difficult to manage or operate.

    Not responsive to treatment.

firmament
    [biblical cosmology]

    The vast solid dome created by God on the
    second day to divide the primal sea into
    upper and lower portions so that the dry
    land could appear: Then God said, Let
    there be a firmament in the midst of the
    waters, and let it divide the waters from
    the waters.

synthesize
    Make (something) by synthesis, especially
    chemically.

extradite
extradition
    An act where one jurisdiction delivers a
    person accused or convicted of committing
    a crime in another jurisdiction, over to
    their law enforcement.

    It is a cooperative law enforcement
    process between the two jurisdictions and
    depends on the arrangements made between
    them.

daily driver
    [informal north american]

    A car for everyday use.
    "the Corvette will be my daily driver"

ratify
    Sign or give formal consent to (a treaty,
    contract, or agreement), making it
    officially valid.

schlocky
    Something, such as merchandise or
    literature, that is inferior or poorly
    made.

predication
    A proclamation, announcement or preaching.
    An assertion or affirmation.

    (logic) The act of making something the
    subject or predicate of a proposition.

ascertain
    Find (something) out for certain; make
    sure of.

insipid
    Lacking flavour; weak or tasteless.

concision
    [french]

    Qualité d'une personne concise, de ce qui
    est concis.

    La concision du style, de la pensée.

    Similar:
    - brièveté
    - sobriété

marionette
    A puppet controlled from above using wires
    or strings depending on regional
    variations.

    A marionette's puppeteer is called a
    marionettist.

bourgeois
town-dweller
middle-class

    Belonging to or characteristic of the
    middle class, typically with reference to
    its perceived materialistic values or
    conventional attitudes.

    "a rich, bored, bourgeois family"

bourgeoisie
    The middle class, typically with reference
    to its perceived materialistic values or
    conventional attitudes.

    "the rise of the bourgeoisie at the end of
    the eighteenth century"

befuddled
    Cause to become unable to think clearly.

    "even in my befuddled state I could see
    that they meant trouble"

eternal return
eternal recurrence
    A concept that the universe and all
    existence and energy has been recurring,
    and will continue to recur, in a
    self-similar form an infinite number of
    times across infinite time or space.

enharmonic equivalent
    In modern musical notation and tuning, an
    enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval,
    or key signature that is equivalent to
    some other note, interval, or key
    signature but "spelled", or named
    differently.

    Pitches such as F and G are said to be
    enharmonic equivalents; both are sounded
    with the same key on a keyboard
    instrument.

    The same is true of intervals, which are
    always named according to their notation:
    A♭–F is an augmented sixth, while A♭–G
    and G♯–F are both minor sevenths; all are
    enharmonically equivalent.

enharmonic scale
    An [imaginary] gradual progression by
    quarter tones or any [musical] scale
    proceeding by quarter tones.

    The enharmonic scale uses dieses
    nonexistent on most keyboards, since
    modern standard keyboards have only
    half-tone dieses.

diesis
    The double dagger symbol .

quantization
    [mathematics]
    [digital signal processing]

    The process of mapping input values from a
    large set to output values in a smaller
    set, often with a finite number of
    elements.

    Examples:
    - Rounding
    - truncation

censoriousness
censorious
    Harshly critical or expressing censure;
    "was censorious of petty failings"
    critical - marked by a tendency to find
    and call attention to errors and flaws; "a
    critical attitude"

collateral
    Accompanying as secondary or subordinate.

    Serving to support or reinforce.

    "Gave it to him as collateral".

mishap
    An unlucky accident.

    "although there were a few minor mishaps,
    none of the pancakes stuck to the ceiling"

verbatim
    Said "ver-bey-tim".

disparage
disparaged
    Regard or represent as being of little
    worth.

    If you disparage someone or something, you
    speak about them in a way which shows that
    you do not have a good opinion of them.

denigrate
    Criticize unfairly; disparage.

autocratic
Relating to a ruler who has absolute power.

skirt around (someone or something)
    1. To lie around the edge of something.
    The small creek skirting around the edge
    of our property has always been a source
    of fascination to our kids.

    "The proposed highway will skirt around
    the city to ease the pressure of rush-hour
    commuters."

    2. To move around someone or something so
    as to avoid or evade them or it.

    "The pilots changed course in order to
    skirt around the storm."

    "I skirted around the security guard when
    his back was turned and made my way into
    the building."

    3. To avoid or evade some issue or topic,
    as by circumlocution.

displaced reference
    A term for conversations in which people
    describe things that have occurred in the
    past.

    Until now, it has only ever been observed
    in humansit was assumed that other
    animals are not capable of understanding
    the idea of things happening in the past
    or the future.

    Orangutans do it too.

no bearing
    To be relevant/not relevant to something,
    or to have an influence/no influence on
    it.

    His private life has no bearing on his
    competence as a manager.

    Synonyms and related words.

deranged
    Mad; insane.

    Crazed, insane, demented, unbalanced, and
    unhinged are all synonyms for deranged.

unbalanced
of unsound mind
    not giving accurate, fair, or equal
    coverage to all aspects; partial.
    "this may give an unbalanced impression of

    the competition"

    (of a person) emotionally or mentally
    disturbed.

    "she considered him to be mentally
    unbalanced and dangerous"

rectify
    Put right; correct.

    convert (alternating current) to direct
    current.

    "the current from the transformers is
    rectified by high-voltage diodes"

    See "rectenna".

espouse
    Adopt or support (a cause, belief, or way
    of life).

blackball
    Reject (a candidate applying to become a
    member of a private club), typically by
    means of a secret ballot.

    "her husband was blackballed when he tried
    to join the Country Club"

self-reference
self-referential
    Occurs in natural or formal languages when
    a sentence, idea or formula refers to
    itself.

    The reference may be expressed either
    directlythrough some intermediate
    sentence or formulaor by means of some
    encoding.

    A statement that refers to itself or its
    own referent.

    The most famous example of a self-
    referential sentence is the liar sentence:

    This sentence is not true.

    Self-reference is often used in a broader
    context as well.

    For instance, a picture could be
    considered self-referential if it contains
    a copy of itself (see the animated image
    above); and a piece of literature could be
    considered self-referential if it includes
    a reference to the work itself.

    In philosophy, self-reference is primarily
    studied in the context of language.

    Self-reference within language is not only
    a subject of philosophy, but also a field
    of individual interest in mathematics and
    CS, in particular in relation to the
    foundations of these sciences.

filibuster
    A political procedure where one or more
    members of parliament or congress debate
    over a proposed piece of legislation so as
    to delay or entirely prevent a decision
    being made on the proposal.

circumstantiality
circumstantial thinking
circumstantial speech
    People with circumstantiality often
    include excessive irrelevant details in
    their speaking or writing.

    They maintain their original train of
    thought but provide a lot of unnecessary
    details before circling back to their main
    point.

deprecation
    The discouragement of use of some
    terminology, feature, design, or practice,
    typically because it has been superseded
    or is no longer considered efficient or
    safe, without completely removing it or
    prohibiting its use.

good graces
in (one's) good graces.
    In one's favor; having earned one's
    approval or regard.

    John's been in my good graces ever since
    he helped get me out of debt.

    I was definitely not in Mary's good graces
    for a while after I lost her cat.  See
    also: good, grace.

remediation
    The action of remedying something, in
    particular of reversing or stopping
    environmental damage.

accretion
    Growth or increase by the gradual
    accumulation of additional layers or
    matter.

progenitor
    A person or thing from which a person,
    animal, or plant is descended or
    originates; an ancestor or parent.

    A person who originates a cultural or
    intellectual movement.

convalescence
    Time spent recovering from an illness or
    medical treatment; recuperation.  'a
    period of convalescence'

    - recuperation,
    - recovery,
    - return to health,
    - process of getting better,
    - rehabilitation,
    - improvement,
    - mending,
    - restoration

convalescent
convalescent person
    A person who is recovering from an illness
    or undergoing a period of rest and
    recovery.

repertoire
    A stock of plays, dances, or items that a
    company or a performer knows or is
    prepared to perform.

vaunted
    Praised or boasted about, especially in an
    excessive way.

    "our vaunted uniqueness"

intelligible
    Able to be understood; comprehensible.

thwarted
    prevent (someone) from accomplishing something.

    oppose (a plan, attempt, or ambition) successfully.

    "he never did anything to thwart his father"

    "thwarted death"

congenial
    (of a person) pleasing or liked on account
    of having qualities or interests that are
    similar to one's own.

    "congenial to life"

dupe
duped
    Deceive; trick.

vernacular
the vernacular
    The language or dialect spoken by the
    ordinary people in a particular country or
    region.

sycophant
    A person who acts obsequiously towards
    someone important in order to gain
    advantage.

    An insincere flatterer.

    Used to refer to someone practicing
    sycophancy.

simpering
    Affectedly coy or ingratiating.

    "she is clearly not a simpering female who
    can be pushed around"

ingratiating
    Intended to gain approval or favour;
    sycophantic.

tongue in cheek
    Speaking or writing in an ironic or
    insincere way.

    "one suspects that he is writing with
    tongue in cheek"

corollary
    A proposition that follows from (and is
    often appended to) one already proved.

ire
    Anger.

    "aroused the ire of ..."

furnish
    Be a source of; provide.

    "fish furnish an important source of
    protein"

    "furnish information"

fawning
    Displaying exaggerated flattery or
    affection; obsequious.

advertorials
    A newspaper or magazine advertisement
    giving information about a product in the
    style of an editorial or objective
    journalistic article.

vagabond
    A person who wanders from place to place
    without a home or job.

provisional
    Something that has been arranged or
    appointed for the present, but may be
    changed in the future.

    "...the possibility of setting up a
    provisional coalition government..."

    "quantum mechanics is a provisional
    theory"

dissimulate
dissimulation
    The act of faking your true feelings.

    Your dissimulation of happiness might fool
    strangers but your close friends can tell
    it's all an act.

    The word dissimulation implies that the
    wool is being pulled over someone's eyes,
    or they're being fooled or tricked by
    someone's deceit.

    Conceal or disguise (one's thoughts,
    feelings, or character).

    "a country gentleman who dissimulates his
    wealth beneath ragged pullovers"

avail
    Help or benefit.

    "no amount of struggle availed Charles"

on my behalf
    To act or speak for another person when
    that other person permits because they
    either cannot themselves or are not
    physically present.

vernacular
    The language or dialect spoken by the
    ordinary people in a particular country or
    region.

thankless
    Not likely to be appreciated or rewarded;
    unappreciated: a thankless job.

    Not feeling or expressing gratitude or
    appreciation; ungrateful: a thankless
    child.

    Examples:
    - thankless life
    - thankless job

pizzazz
with pizzazz
    An attractive combination of vitality and
    glamour.

    "a summer collection with pizzazz"

fell
    [adjective]

    Of terrible evil or ferocity; deadly.

    "Sometimes, the wind also brought
    unnervingly fell sounds with it, as if a
    chorus of unholy demons was singing in the
    distance."

dirge
    A lament for the dead, especially one
    forming part of a funeral rite.

    A mournful song, piece of music, or sound.
    "singers chanted dirges"

    A song or piece of music that is
    considered too slow, miserable, or boring.
    "after his ten-minute dirge, the audience
    booed"

radii
    Said "ray-dee-eye".

muster
    Assemble (troops), especially for
    inspection or in preparation for battle.

in broad strokes
    [idiom]

    Major features or key points; outline.

    (idiomatic, especially of a narrative or
    artistic work)

    Developments, movements, or descriptions
    presented in a bold or sweeping manner,
    without intricacy, adornment, or subtlety.

forlorn
    Pitifully sad and abandoned or lonely.

languish
    (of a person, animal, or plant) lose or
    lack vitality; grow weak.
    "plants may appear to be languishing
    simply because they are dormant"

    Be forced to remain in an unpleasant place
    or situation.
    "he has been languishing in jail since
    1974"

aught else
    Anything.

propound
    Put forward (an idea or theory) for
    consideration by others.

    "he began to propound the idea of a
    social monarchy as an alternative to
    Franco"

imperishable
    Enduring forever.

countenance
    A person's face or facial expression.

    "his impenetrable eyes and inscrutable
    countenance give little away"

    "His countenance was stern"

bray
    (of a person) speak or laugh loudly and
    harshly.

    "he brayed with laughter"

presumptively
    Based on a presumption; presumed: the
    party's presumptive nominee.

    Providing a reasonable basis for belief or
    acceptance: presumptive evidence.

indubitably
    Impossible to doubt.

    "indubitably, the last"

jieba
stuttering
    jieba (chinese)

    A speech disorder involving frequent
    problems with the normal fluency and flow
    of speech.

compendium
    A collection of concise but detailed
    information about a particular subject,
    especially in a book or other publication.

    "compendium of nonsense"

corroborate
    Confirm or give support to (a statement,
    theory, or finding).

    "I would like to corroborate your story
    before we proceed further."

ascertain
    Find (something) out for certain; make sure of.

    "an attempt to ascertain the cause of the
    accident"

    "I am attempting to ascertain whether Dr.
    Tainer's story is true."

cur
    Used to describe a mongrel dog,
    particularly of aggressive or unfriendly
    nature.

    The term is believed to be derived from
    the Old Norse kurra, meaning 'to grumble
    or growl'.

supplant
    Supersede and replace.

purview
    The scope of the influence or concerns of
    something.

livery
    A special uniform worn by a servant, an
    official, or a member of a City Company.

gaffer
    A person in charge of others; a boss.

pall
    A thick, dark cloud of smoke.

    The bad news cast a pall over the evening.

    "pall of the cloud".

subtle
    (especially of a change or distinction) so
    delicate or precise as to be difficult to
    analyse or describe.
    "his language expresses rich and subtle meanings".

    Making use of clever and indirect methods
    to achieve something.

    Crafty; cunning.

bower
    A pleasant shady place under trees or
    climbing plants in a garden or wood.

    shade or enclose (a place or person).
    "trees here and there bowered the
    cottages"

    "the walls of your bower closing in about
    you"

hutch
    A box or cage, typically with a wire mesh
    front, for keeping rabbits or other small
    domesticated animals.
    "a rabbit hutch"

trammel
    Restrictions or impediments to freedom of
    action.

    "we will forge our own future, free from
    the trammels of materialism"

    "a hutch to trammel some wild thing"

stratagem
    A plan or scheme, especially one used to
    outwit an opponent or achieve an end.

dramatization
    A play or film adapted from a novel or
    depicting a particular incident.
    "the film is a dramatization of a true story"

    The process of adapting a novel or
    presenting a particular incident in a play
    or film.

    "Plato's dramatization of Socrates"

continuity
    Consistency of the characteristics of
    people, plot, objects, and places seen by
    the reader or viewer over some period of
    time.

    It is relevant to several media.

    Continuity is particularly a concern in
    the production of film and television due
    to the difficulty of rectifying an error
    in continuity after shooting has wrapped
    up.

    It also applies to other art forms,
    including novels, comics, and video games,
    though usually on a smaller scale.

    It also applies to fiction used by
    persons, corporations, and governments in
    the public eye.

NIMBY
Not In My Back Yard
    A person who objects to the siting of
    something perceived as unpleasant or
    hazardous in the area where they live,
    especially while raising no such
    objections to similar developments
    elsewhere.
    "rural development arouses intense
    suspicion from NIMBYs and
    conservationists"

specious
    Superficially plausible, but actually
    wrong.

petulant
    (of a person or their manner) childishly
    sulky or bad-tempered.

pestilent adjective
    Destructive of life.

    Injuring or endangering society.

    Causing displeasure or annoyance.

pernicious
    Having a harmful effect, especially in a
    gradual or subtle way.

bikeshed
    A topic that is attracting debate ad
    nauseam, out of all proportion to its
    actual importance.

bikeshedding
    The process of arguing endlessly over
    details of some small and relatively
    unimportant thing.

    Originates as a metaphor to explain
    Parkinsons Law of Triviality.

through line
throughline
    A connecting theme, plot, or
    characteristic in a film, television
    series, book, etc.
    "despite the differences between the two
    seasons, there are still through lines"

wait for the ball to drop
    (idiomatic, rare)

    To wait in expectation of an occurrence.

zoomorphic
    Having or representing animal forms or
    gods of animal form.

repudiation
    Rejection of a proposal or idea.
    "the repudiation of reformist policies"

    Denial of the truth or validity of
    something.

surrogate
    A substitute, especially a person
    deputizing for another in a specific role
    or office.
    "she served as a surrogate for the
    President on a trip to South America"

supposition
    A belief held without proof or certain
    knowledge; an assumption or hypothesis.

stipulation
    A condition or requirement that is
    specified or demanded as part of an
    agreement.

retcon
Retroactive continuity
    Revise (an aspect of a fictional work)
    retrospectively, typically by introducing
    a piece of new information that imposes a
    different interpretation on previously
    described events.

    A literary device in which established
    diegetic 'facts' in the plot of a
    fictional work are adjusted, ignored, or
    contradicted by a subsequently published
    work which breaks continuity with the
    former.

    "I think fans get more upset when
    characters act blatantly out of
    established type, or when things get
    retconned"

escapade
    An act or incident involving excitement,
    daring, or adventure.

    "latest escapade"

chastised
    Rebuke or reprimand severely.

scathing
    Witheringly scornful; severely critical.

    "she launched a scathing attack on the
    Prime Minister"

schematic
    (of a diagram or other representation)
    symbolic and simplified.

    "a schematic representation"

induce
    To bringing about a desired result.

aspergion
    A false or misleading charge meant to harm
    someone's reputation casting aspersions on
    her integrity.

    The act of making such a charge :
    defamation.

    A sprinkling with water especially in
    religious ceremonies the aspersion of the
    congregation before Mass.

cast aspergions
    To say harsh critical things about someone

    He tried to discuss his political
    opponents respectfully, without casting
    aspersions.

unsubstantiated
    Not supported or proven by evidence.

concede
    Admit that something is true or valid
    after first denying or resisting it.

relent
retented
    Abandon or mitigate a severe or harsh
    attitude, especially by finally yielding
    to a request.

sleuth of bears
    A group of bears is called a sleuth or a
    sloth.

zany
zaniness
    The quality of being laughable or comical:
    comedy, comicality, comicalness, drollery,
    drollness, farcicality, funniness, humor,
    humorousness, jocoseness, jocosity,
    jocularity, ludicrousness, ridiculousness,
    wit, wittiness.

prosaic
    Having or using the style or diction of
    prose as opposed to poetry; lacking
    imaginativeness or originality.

    "prosaic language can't convey the
    experience"

ilk
    A type of person or thing similar to one
    already referred to.

    "the veiled suggestions that reporters of
    his ilk seem to be so good at"

tapestry
    A picture woven into cloth.

    It's a decorative rug you hang on the
    wall, with detailed images or designs on
    it.

    Some tapestries, like the famous Unicorn
    Tapestries, tell stories with their
    pictures.

    Weaving an image into cloth is a brilliant
    idea  it makes art accessible and
    portable.

power couple
    A couple consisting of two people who are
    each influential or successful in their
    own right.

surreptitiously
    In a way that attempts to avoid notice or
    attention; secretively.

    "Mary surreptitiously slipped from the
    room"

exquisite
    Extremely beautiful and delicate.

    "exquisite, jewel-like portraits"

sympatico
simpatico
    Getting along and having mutual
    understanding with another.

    A teacher who is caring and understanding
    of her students' needs may be described as
    sympatico.

eschatology
    Eschatology is a part of theology
    concerned with the final events of
    history, or the ultimate destiny of
    humanity.

    This concept is commonly referred to as
    the "end of the world" or "end times".

    "AI eschatology"

broach
    Raise (a difficult subject) for
    discussion.

    "he broached the subject he had been
    avoiding all evening"

gilded
gilding
gilt
    Covered thinly with gold leaf or gold paint.

    A decorative technique for applying a very
    thin coating of gold to solid surfaces
    such as metal, wood, porcelain, or stone.

    A gilded object is also described as
    "gilt".

no quarter
    Generally used during military conflict to
    imply combatants would not be taken
    prisoner, but killed.

    Take no prisoners was a similar phrase
    also generally used.

Luddite
Ludditism
    A person opposed to new technology or ways
    of working.

    A member of any of the bands of English
    workers who destroyed machinery,
    especially in cotton and woollen mills,
    that they believed was threatening their
    jobs (181116).

derezzed
derez
deresolution
    A term used to describe someone or
    something disappearing or dissolving,
    essentially resulting in deletion.

    It is a program's equivalent of death or
    the destruction of a building or vehicle.

minstrel
    A medieval European entertainer.

    Originally describing any type of
    entertainer such as a musician, juggler,
    acrobat, singer or fool, the term later,
    from the sixteenth century, came to mean a
    specialist entertainer who sang songs and
    played musical instruments.

trying times
    Times of trouble, struggle, or
    unhappiness.

    I've had my share of trying times over the
    years, but they helped shape me into the
    person I am today.

foundling
    An infant that has been abandoned by its
    parents and is discovered and cared for by
    others.

squall
    A sudden violent gust of wind or localized
    storm, especially one bringing rain, snow,
    or sleet.

    "A terrible squall rustled the ocean
    floor."

veneer
    A thin sheet of a material: such as.
    - a layer of wood of superior value or
      excellent grain to be glued to an
      inferior wood.
    - any of the thin layers bonded together
      to form plywood.

    "Hidden beneath a human veneer."

demeaning
    Causing someone to lose their dignity and
    the respect of others.

neutered

abridge
foreshorten
abbreviate
shorten
    Reduce in scope while retaining essential
    elements.

    "The manuscript must be shortened"

    Lessen, diminish, or curtail.

    "the new law might abridge our freedom of
    expression"

biopic
    A film dramatizing the life of a
    particular person, typically a public or
    historical figure.

coalescence
    The joining or merging of elements to form
    one mass or whole.

    "the lack of coalescence among fields of
    science"

preponderance
    The quality or fact of being greater in
    number, quantity, or importance.

unbefitting
    Not appropriate; unsuitable.

    "unbefitting conduct"

shewing
shew
    Old-fashioned spelling of show.

plaintiff
    The party who initiates a lawsuit before a
    court.

    By doing so, the plaintiff seeks a legal
    remedy; if this search is successful, the
    court will issue judgment in favor of the
    plaintiff and make the appropriate court
    order.

chiching
    Celebratory remarks when you've made a
    deal or money.

    A win win situation when the outcome
    benefits each of two often opposing
    groups.

    The sound of a cash register drawer
    opening to collect money for a sale.

conviction
    The feeling of being sure that what you
    believe or say is true.

    Someone being found guilty of a crime or
    having a strong belief in something.

    No longer with any doubt.

    Examples:
    - Being found guilty of driving while
      intoxicated.
    - Completely believing they are right
      about something.

vindication
    The action of clearing someone of blame or
    suspicion.
    "I intend to work to ensure my full
    vindication"

    Proof that someone or something is right,
    reasonable, or justified.
    "the results were interpreted as
    vindication of the company's policy"

Celluloid
    A class of materials produced by mixing
    nitrocellulose and camphor, often with
    added dyes and other agents.

    Once much more common, celluloid's common
    contemporary uses are table tennis balls,
    musical instruments, combs, office
    equipment, and guitar picks.

behoove
    It is a duty or responsibility for someone
    to do something.
    "it behoves the House to assure itself
    that there is no conceivable alternative"

    It is appropriate or suitable; it befits.
    "it ill behoves Opposition Members to
    decry the sale of arms to friendly
    countries"

adamant
    Refusing to be persuaded or to change
    one's mind.
    "he is adamant that he is not going to
    resign"

progeniture
    The production of offspring; procreation.

    Progeny; offspring.

adjudicate
    Make a formal judgement on a disputed
    matter.
    "the Committee adjudicates on all betting
    disputes"

retrograde
    Directed or moving backwards.
    "a retrograde flow"

    Same direction as rotation.
    "retrograde orbit"

Apparent retrograde motion
    The apparent motion of a planet in a
    direction opposite to that of other bodies
    within its system, as observed from a
    particular vantage point.

    Direct motion or prograde motion is motion
    in the same direction as other bodies.

Detritus
    [biology]

    Dead particulate organic material, as
    distinguished from dissolved organic
    material.

    Detritus typically includes the bodies or
    fragments of bodies of dead organisms, and
    fecal material.

    Detritus typically hosts communities of
    microorganisms that colonize and decompose
    it.

matter-of-fact
    Adhering to the unembellished facts.

    Being plain, straightforward, or
    unemotional.

dash-case
kebab-case
lisp-case
spinal-case

relatably
    [not a real word]

    In a relatable manner.

adjudication vs arbitration
    Arbitration is a procedure in which both
    sides agree to let an impartial third
    party, the arbitrator, decide the case.

    In adjudication, the decision is the
    responsibility of a third party
    adjudicator selected by the parties to the
    dispute.

satiety
    The feeling or state of being sated.

sensory-specific satiety
    A sensory hedonic phenomenon that refers
    to the declining satisfaction generated by
    the consumption of a certain type of food,
    and the consequent renewal in appetite
    resulting from the exposure to a new
    flavor or food.

dishevelled
    (of a person's hair, clothes, or
    appearance) untidy; disordered.

misgive
misgave
    (of a person's mind or heart) fill (that
    person) with doubt, apprehension, or
    foreboding.

assiduous
    Showing great care and perseverance.
    "she was assiduous in pointing out every
    feature"

deterrence
    The action of discouraging an action or
    event through instilling doubt or fear of
    the consequences.

empathy
    The capacity to understand or feel what
    another person is experiencing from within
    their frame of reference, that is, the
    capacity to place oneself in another's
    position.

externality
    An externality is a cost or benefit caused
    by a producer that is not financially
    incurred or received by that producer.

    An externality can be both positive or
    negative and can stem from either the
    production or consumption of a good or
    service.

    "An unpriced externality".

fraudulence
    The action or quality of cheating, lying,
    or deceiving someone.

    The fraudulence of an election might
    trigger a recount, or even an entirely new
    election.

    Fraudulence is telling lies or hoaxing
    people in some way.

adorable
    Inspiring great affection or delight.
    "I have four adorable Siamese cats"

adore
    Love and respect (someone) deeply.
    "he adored his mother"

earnest
    Resulting from or showing sincere and
    intense conviction.

vestigial
    Forming a very small remnant of something
    that was once greater or more noticeable.
    "he felt a vestigial flicker of anger from
    last night"

Vestigiality
    The retention during the process of
    evolution of genetically determined
    structures or attributes that have lost
    some or all of the ancestral function in a
    given species.

    Assessment of the vestigiality must
    generally rely on comparison with
    homologous features in related species.

addle-brain
    A foolish or dull-witted person.

obstreperous
    Noisy and difficult to control.
    "the boy is cocky and obstreperous"

solipsism
    The philosophical idea that only one's
    mind is sure to exist.

    As an epistemological position, solipsism
    holds that knowledge of anything outside
    one's own mind is unsure; the external
    world and other minds cannot be known and
    might not exist outside the mind.

    The view or theory that the self is all
    that can be known to exist.

    The quality of being self-centred or
    selfish.

venerated
    Regard with great respect; revere.
    "one of the most venerated actors"

blustery
    (of weather) characterized by strong
    winds.
    "a gusty, blustery day"

    (of a wind) blowing in strong gusts.
    "a blustery wind was sending flurries of
    rain against the window"

eponymous
    (of a person) giving their name to
    something.
    "the eponymous hero of the novel"

    (of a thing) named after a particular
    person or group.
    "their eponymous debut LP"

pretence
    An attempt to make something that is not
    the case appear true.
    "his anger is masked by a pretence that
    all is well"

Subduction
    A geological process in which oceanic
    lithosphere is recycled into the Earth's
    mantle at convergent boundaries.

    Where the oceanic lithosphere of a
    tectonic plate converges with the less
    dense lithosphere of a second plate, the
    heavier plate dives beneath the second
    plate and sinks into the mantle.

dinky
    (of an object or place) attractively small
    and neat.
    "a dinky little restaurant"

subterfuge
    Deceit used in order to achieve one's
    goal.
    "he had to use subterfuge and bluff on
    many occasions"

garner
    Gather or collect (something, especially
    information or approval).
    "the police struggled to garner sufficient
    evidence"

blackball
    Reject (a candidate applying to become a
    member of a private club), typically by
    means of a secret ballot.

    "her husband was blackballed when he tried
    to join the Country Club"

malign
    Speak about (someone) in a spitefully
    critical manner.
    "don't you dare malign her in my presence"

    "you must never malign a man".

ravished
    Fill (someone) with intense delight;
    enrapture.
    "ravished by a sunny afternoon, she had
    agreed without even thinking"

sanguine
    Optimistic or positive, especially in an
    apparently bad or difficult situation.
    "he is sanguine about prospects for the
    global economy"

    A blood-red colour.

vapid
    Offering nothing that is stimulating or
    challenging; bland.
    "tuneful but vapid musical comedies"

abate
    (of something unpleasant or severe) become
    less intense or widespread.

unabated
    Not abated.

    Being at full strength or force.

portend
portended
    Be a sign or warning that (something,
    especially something momentous or
    calamitous) is likely to happen.

    Foreshadow.

unfettered
    Unrestrained or uninhibited.

    "unfettered artistic genius"

aphelion
    The point in the orbit of an object where
    it is farthest from the Sun.

    The point in orbit where an object is
    nearest to the sun is called the
    perihelion.

    The word aphelion derives from the Greek
    words, apo meaning away, off, apart and
    Helios.

Apsis
    Denotes either of the two extreme points
    in the orbit of a planetary body about its
    primary body.

    The plural term, "apsides," usually
    implies both apsis points; apsides can
    also refer to the distance of the extreme
    range of an object orbiting a host body.

contemptible
    Despicable, pitiable, sorry, scurvy mean
    arousing or deserving scorn.

    Contemptible may imply any quality
    provoking scorn or a low standing in any
    scale of values. a contemptible liar
    despicable may imply utter worthlessness
    and usually suggests arousing an attitude
    of moral indignation.

categorically
    In a way that is unambiguously explicit
    and direct.
    "the rules state categorically, 'No
    Violence'"

candour
candor
    The quality of being open and honest;
    frankness.
    "a man of refreshing candour"

beguiling
    Charming or enchanting, often in a
    deceptive way.
    "a beguiling mixture of English, French,
    and Italian"

ratify
    Sign or give formal consent to (a treaty,
    contract, or agreement), making it
    officially valid.
    "both countries were due to ratify the
    treaty by the end of the year"

smidgen
    A small amount of something.
    "add a smidgen of cayenne"

    "a smidgen bit lower"

Quantitative easing
    A monetary policy whereby a central bank
    purchases at scale government bonds or
    other financial assets in order to inject
    money into the economy to expand economic
    activity.

talisman
    An object, typically an inscribed ring or
    stone, that is thought to have magic
    powers and to bring good luck.
    "those rings, so fresh and gleaming, were
    their talismans"

insurrection
    A violent uprising against an authority or
    government.
    "the insurrection was savagely put down"

barycenter
barycentre
    [astronomy]

    The center of mass of two or more bodies
    that orbit one another and is the point
    about which the bodies orbit.

    It is an important concept in fields such
    as astronomy and astrophysics.

transcredible
    Adj. possibly credible or plausible.
    Believable, but possibly exaggerated.

    My uncle's fishing stories are always
    transcredible; sometimes the fish are
    described as larger than they really are!

    by ZapBrannigan January 18, 2011

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=transcredible

wily
    Skilled at gaining an advantage,
    especially deceitfully.

    "his wily opponents"

veritable
    Used for emphasis, often to qualify a
    metaphor.

    "the early 1970s witnessed a veritable
    price explosion"

    "it's a veritable garden of eden"

bipartisan
    Involving the agreement or cooperation of
    two political parties that usually oppose
    each other's policies.

    "the reforms received considerable
    bipartisan approval"

egotism
    The fact of being excessively conceited or
    absorbed in oneself.

    "in his arrogance and egotism, he
    underestimated Gill"

pertinent
    Relevant or applicable to a particular
    matter; apposite.

    "This is becoming a pertinent enough issue
    that we have decided to..."

apposite
    Apt in the circumstances or in relation to
    something.

    "an apposite quotation"

dawdle
    Waste time; be slow.

    "she mustn't dawdleshe had to make the
    call now"

jaunty
    Having or expressing a lively, cheerful,
    and self-confident manner.

    "there was no mistaking that jaunty walk"

corollary
    [noun]
        A proposition that follows from (and
        is often appended to) one already
        proved.

    [adjective]
        Forming a proposition that follows
        from one already proved.

platitudes
    A remark or statement, especially one with
    a moral content, that has been used too
    often to be interesting or thoughtful.

    "he masks his disdain for her with
    platitudes about how she should believe in
    herself more"

rapacious
    aggressively greedy or grasping.
    "rapacious landlords"
    "rapacious intellect"

impetuous
    Acting or done quickly and without thought
    or care.
    "she might live to rue this impetuous
    decision"

    Moving forcefully or rapidly.
    "an impetuous but controlled flow of
    water"

at loggerheads
    In or into a state of quarrelsome
    disagreement.

abated
abatable
    Made less extreme or serious.

qualifiable
    1.
        Capable of qualifying or being
        qualified.

    2.
        Able to be modified, limited or
        restricted (to become qualified).

        Capable of being qualified; abatable;
        modifiable.

mosey
    Walk or move in a leisurely manner.
    "we decided to mosey on up to Montgomery"

    A leisurely walk or drive.
    "I'll just have a mosey round"

truculent
    Eager or quick to argue or fight;
    aggressively defiant.
    "the truculent attitude of farmers to
    cheaper imports"

curmudgeonly
    (especially of an old person) bad-tempered
    and negative.
    "a curmudgeonly old man"

tarnish
tarnishes
    Tarnish is a thin layer of corrosion that
    forms over copper, brass, aluminum,
    magnesium, neodymium and other similar
    metals as their outermost layer undergoes
    a chemical reaction.

    Tarnish does not always result from the
    sole effects of oxygen in the air.

    https://youtu.be/fmaZdEq-Xzs?t=1114

Inshallah
Insha'Allah
In sha Allah
    An Arabic language expression meaning "if
    God wills" or "God willing".

    The term is mentioned in the Quran and
    Muslims are commanded to use it when
    speaking on future events, so it is also
    used to fulfill this Quranic command.

repudiation
repudiated
repudiate
    Refuse to accept or be associated with.

    Rejection of a proposal or idea.

    "the repudiation of reformist policies"

    Denial of the truth or validity of
    something.

proclivities
    A tendency to choose or do something
    regularly; an inclination or
    predisposition towards a particular thing.

    "a proclivity for hard work"

indoctrination
    The process of teaching a person or group
    to accept a set of beliefs uncritically.

    "I would never subject children to
    religious indoctrination"

contravention
    An action which offends against a law,
    treaty, or other ruling.

    "the publishing of misleading
    advertisements was a contravention of the
    Act"

doublethink
    [George Orwell's 1984]

    A process of indoctrination whereby the
    subject is expected to simultaneously
    accept two mutually contradictory beliefs
    as correct, often in contravention to
    one's own memories or sense of reality.

    Doublethink is related to, but differs
    from, hypocrisy.

    To know and not to know, to be conscious
    of complete truthfulness while telling
    carefully constructed lies, to hold
    simultaneously two opinions which
    cancelled out, knowing them to be
    contradictory and believing in both of
    them, to use logic against logic, to
    repudiate morality while laying claim to
    it, to believe that democracy was
    impossible and that the Party was the
    guardian of democracy, to forget whatever
    it was necessary to forget, then to draw
    it back into memory again at the moment
    when it was needed, and then promptly to
    forget it again, and above all, to apply
    the same process to the process
    itselfthat was the ultimate subtlety:
    consciously to induce unconsciousness, and
    then, once again, to become unconscious of
    the act of hypnosis you had just
    performed.

    Even to understand the
    worddoublethinkinvolved the use of
    doublethink.

    Four examples of doublethink used
    throughout 1984 include the slogans:
    - War is Peace,
    - Freedom is Slavery,
    - Ignorance is Strength, and
    - 2 + 2 = 5.

Memory hole
    [George Orwell's 1984]

    A small chute leading to a large
    incinerator.

    Anything that needed to be wiped from the
    public record (embarrassing documents,
    photographs, transcripts) would be sent
    into the memory hole.

    As a clerk in the Records Department of
    the Ministry of Truth, Winston Smith often
    has to throw things into the memory hole
    to revise history and keep current with
    the ever-evolving Party dogma.

Newspeak
    [George Orwell's 1984]

    A purposefully ambiguous and confusing
    language with restricted grammar and
    limited vocabulary used in Oceania,
    according or Orwell, to diminish the
    range of thought.

    For example, in newspeak, the term
    plusgood had replaced words better and
    great.

Thinkpol
    [George Orwell's 1984]

    A newspeak word to describe the secret
    police of Oceania, who are responsible for
    the detection, prosecution, and
    elimination of unspoken beliefs and doubts
    that contradict the Party.

    They use audio-visual surveillance via the
    telescreens and offender profiling to
    monitor the populace.

Unperson
    [George Orwell's 1984]

    Someone whose existence has been excised
    from the public and private memory in
    Oceania.


beeline
    He made a beeline for the refreshments. In
    this expression, beeline means the
    shortest distance between two points,
    alluding to the route of worker bees
    bringing nectar and pollen back to the
    hive.

supplant
    Supersede and replace.

heraldry
    A broad term, encompassing the design,
    display, and study of armorial bearings
    (known as armory), as well as related
    disciplines, such as vexillology, together
    with the study of ceremony, rank, and
    pedigree.

dotard
    An old person, especially one who has
    become physically weak or whose mental
    faculties have declined.

gibbet
    Any instrument of public execution, but
    gibbeting refers to the use of a gallows-
    type structure from which the dead or
    dying bodies of criminals were hanged on
    public display to deter other existing or
    potential criminals

hewing
hewn
    [woodworking]

    The process of converting a log from its
    rounded natural form into lumber with more
    or less flat surfaces using primarily an
    axe.

    It is an ancient method, and before the
    advent of the industrial-era type of
    sawmills, it was a standard way of
    squaring up wooden beams for timber
    framing.

mulligan
    A stew made from odds and ends of food.

    (in informal golf) an extra stroke allowed
    after a poor shot, not counted on the
    scorecard.

    A second chance to perform an action,
    usually after the first chance went wrong
    through bad luck or a blunder.

    Its best-known meaning is in golf, whereby
    a player is informally allowed to replay a
    stroke, even though this is against the
    formal rules of golf.

do one's bidding
    To do what someone else wants or has
    requested, to the point of servitude.

isotropic
    Uniformity in all orientations; it is
    derived from the Greek isos and tropos.

    Precise definitions depend on the subject
    area.

    Exceptions, or inequalities, are
    frequently indicated by the prefix an,
    hence anisotropy

rain check
    1. SINGULAR NOUN
        If you say you will take a rain check
        on an offer or suggestion, you mean
        that you do not want to accept it now,
        but you might accept it at another
        time.

        I was planning to ask you in for a
        brandy, but if you want to take a rain
        check, that's fine.

        Can I take a rain check on that?

    2. COUNTABLE NOUN
        A rain check is a free ticket that is
        given to people when an outdoor game
        or event is stopped because of rain or
        bad weather, so that they can go to it
        when it is held again.

beguile
    Charm or enchant (someone), often in a
    deceptive way.
    "he beguiled the voters with his good
    looks"

disinformation
    False or misleading information that is
    spread deliberately to deceive.

    This is a subset of misinformation.

    The English word disinformation is a loan
    translation of the Russian
    dezinformatsiya, derived from the title of
    a KGB black propaganda department.

epaulette
    An ornamental shoulder piece on an item of
    clothing, especially on the coat or jacket
    of a military uniform.

    "an army greatcoat with fancy epaulettes
    and brass buttons"

polysemy
    The capacity for a word or phrase to have
    multiple meanings, usually related by
    contiguity of meaning within a semantic
    field.

    Polysemy is thus distinct from homonymyor
    homophonywhich is an accidental
    similarity between two words; while
    homonymy is often a mere linguistic
    coincidence, polysemy is not.

astuteness
    The ability to penetrate deeply into
    ideas.

sycophant
    An insincere flatterer.

    Used to refer to someone practicing
    sycophancy.

    The word has its origin in the legal
    system of Classical Athens.

sycophancy
    Obsequious behaviour towards someone
    important in order to gain advantage.

    "your fawning sycophancy is nauseating"

fawning
    Displaying exaggerated flattery or
    affection; obsequious.
    "fawning adoration"

obsequious
    Obedient or attentive to an excessive or
    servile degree.
    "they were served by obsequious waiters"

sonder
    https://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com/post/23536922667/sonder

    The realization that each random passerby
    is living a life as vivid and complex as
    your ownpopulated with their own
    ambitions, friends, routines, worries and
    inherited crazinessan epic story that
    continues invisibly around you like an
    anthill sprawling deep underground, with
    elaborate passageways to thousands of
    other lives that youll never know
    existed, in which you might appear only
    once, as an extra sipping coffee in the
    background, as a blur of traffic passing
    on the highway, as a lighted window at
    dusk.

immemorial
times immemorial
time immemorial
    Originating in the distant past; very old.
    "an immemorial custom"

inflection
    A change in the form of a word (typically
    the ending) to express a grammatical
    function or attribute such as tense, mood,
    person, number, case, and gender.

    "a set of word forms differing only in
    respect of inflections"

escapade
    An act or incident involving excitement,
    daring, or adventure.
    "he told of their escapade with a
    ‘borrowed’ truck"

    "sordid escapades"

reticent
    Not revealing one's thoughts or feelings
    readily.
    "she was extremely reticent about her
    personal affairs"

restless
    Unable to rest or relax as a result of
    anxiety or boredom.
    "the audience grew restless and
    inattentive"

elision
elided
    [linguistics]

    An elision or deletion is the omission of
    one or more sounds in a word or phrase.

    The word elision is frequently used in
    linguistic description of living
    languages, and deletion is often used in
    historical linguistics for a historical
    sound change.

    (of a sound or syllable) omitted when speaking.
    "elided consonants"

periphery
    The external boundary of any surface or
    area.

    The external surface of a body.

    The edge or outskirts, as of a city or
    urban area.

    The relatively minor, irrelevant, or
    superficial aspects of the subject in
    question:

        The preliminary research did not, of
        course, take me beyond the periphery
        of my problem.

theocracy
    A system of government in which priests
    rule in the name of God or a god.

    "his ambition is to lead a worldwide
    theocracy"

    The commonwealth of Israel from the time
    of Moses until the election of Saul as
    king.

isolationism
isolationist
    A category of foreign policies
    institutionalized by leaders who assert
    that nations' best interests are best
    served by keeping the affairs of other
    countries at a distance.

succession
    A number of people or things of a similar
    kind following one after the other.

    "she had been secretary to a succession of
    board directors"

    The action or process of inheriting a
    title, office, property, etc.

    "the new king was already elderly at the
    time of his succession"

negentropy
    Neverse entropy.

    It means things becoming more in order.

    By 'order' is meant organisation,
    structure and function: the opposite of
    randomness or chaos.

    One example of negentropy is a star system
    such as the Solar System.

    Another example is life.

    "Negentropy" (with a hard g) is the export
    of entropy from system A to system B in
    order to keep system A in order.

autotelic
    An autotelic is someone or something that
    has a purpose in, and not apart from,
    itself.

tendentious
    Expressing or intending to promote a
    particular cause or point of view,
    especially a controversial one.

    "a tendentious reading of history"

attest
    Provide or serve as clear evidence of.

    "I cannot attest to..."

    "his status is attested by his becoming an
    alderman"

groupthink
    A psychological phenomenon that occurs
    within a group of people in which the
    desire for harmony or conformity in the
    group results in an irrational or
    dysfunctional decision-making outcome.

populism
    A political approach that strives to
    appeal to ordinary people who feel that
    their concerns are disregarded by
    established elite groups.

nebulous
    (of a concept) vague or ill-defined.
    "nebulous concepts like quality of life"

eminate
    Give out or emit (a feeling, quality, or
    sensation).

    "he emanated a powerful brooding air"

    "data that you eminate"

recourse
    The use of (someone or something) as a
    source of help in a difficult situation.

    "a means of solving disputes without
    recourse to courts of law"

    "you have legal recourse"

postulate
    A thing suggested or assumed as true as
    the basis for reasoning, discussion, or
    belief.

    "perhaps the postulate of Babylonian
    influence on Greek astronomy is incorrect"

pejorative
    Expressing contempt or disapproval.

    "permissiveness is used almost universally
    as a pejorative term"

incorrigible
    (of a person or their behaviour) not able
    to be changed or reformed.

    "she's an incorrigible flirt"

compunction
    A feeling of guilt or moral scruple that
    prevents or follows the doing of something
    bad.

    "they used their tanks without
    compunction"

uncollateralized
    Not collateralized.

collateralization
    The use of a valuable asset to secure a
    loan.

    If the borrower defaults on the loan, the
    lender may seize the asset and sell it to
    offset the loss.

    Collateralization of assets gives lenders
    a sufficient level of reassurance against
    default risk.

ere
    [preposition]

    Before (a specified time).

    "we hope you will return ere long"

    [conjunction]

    "I was driven for some half mile ere we
    stopped"

hubris
    Excessive pride or self-confidence.

    "the self-assured hubris among economists
    was shaken in the late 1980s"

trending
    Currently popular or widely discussed
    online, especially on social media
    websites.

    "today's top trending topics"

moniker
    A name.

    "his real moniker is Dave Kennedy"

    "he got his moniker by..."

sepulchral
    Relating to a tomb or interment.
    "sepulchral monuments"

    Gloomy; dismal.
    "a speech delivered in sepulchral tones"

squall
    A loud cry.
    "he emitted a short mournful squall"

    A sudden violent gust of wind or localized
    storm, especially one bringing rain, snow,
    or sleet.
    "low clouds and squalls of driving rain"

pall
    A dark cloud of smoke, dust, etc.
    "a pall of black smoke hung over the
    quarry"

    "an unexpected death would cast a slight
    pall on our meeting"

credulity
    Credulity is a person's willingness or
    ability to believe that a statement is
    true, especially on minimal or uncertain
    evidence.

    Credulity is not necessarily a belief in
    something that may be false: the subject
    of the belief may even be correct, but a
    credulous person will believe it without
    good evidence.

    "it would strain credulity at that"

keeping mum
mum
    Mum is an adjective that means keeping
    quiet.

    It can also be used by itself to mean Be
    quiet!

    This sense of mum is especially used in
    the expressions keep mum and mum's the
    word.

    "he was mum on that"

cretinous
    Foolish or stupid.

    Physically deformed and having learning
    difficulties as a result of congenital
    thyroid deficiency.

    "cretinous world of crypto traders"

coaxing
    Persistent gentle persuasion.
    "he refused to return to the game despite
    the coaxing of his teammates"

    Gently and persistently persuasive.
    "they speak in a coaxing manner when they
    want something"

doldrums
    A state or period of stagnation or
    depression.
    "the mortgage market has been in the
    doldrums for three years"

lummox
    A clumsy, stupid person.
    "watch it, you great lummox!"

homunculus
    A very small human or humanoid creature.

calamy
calumnies
    A false statement maliciously made to
    injure another's reputation.

    The utterance of maliciously false
    statements; slander.

slander and calamy

contrite
    Feeling or expressing remorse at the
    recognition that one has done wrong.

    "a contrite tone"

    "humble and contrite"

collocation
    [corpus linguistics]

    A collocation is a series of words or
    terms that co-occur more often than would
    be expected by chance.

    [phraseology]

    A sub-type of phraseme.

    An example of a phraseological
    collocation, as propounded by Michael
    Halliday, is the expression strong tea.

    [linguistics]

    The habitual juxtaposition of a particular
    word with another word or words with a
    frequency greater than chance.

    "the words have a similar range of
    collocation"

cack-handed
    [informal british]

    Inept; clumsy.

    "a great song ruined by cack-handed
    production"

    "cack-handed deck apes"

broadside
    A broadside is the side of a ship, the
    battery of cannon on one side of a
    warship; or their coordinated fire in
    naval warfare.

    From the 16th century until the early
    decades of the steamship, vessels had rows
    of guns set in each side of the hull.

    Firing all guns on one side of the ship
    became known as a "broadside".

untempered
    Not moderated or lessened by anything.

    "the products of a technological mastery
    untempered by political imagination"

enfranchise
    Give the right to vote to.

surreptitiously
    In a way that attempts to avoid notice or
    attention; secretively.

    "Mary surreptitiously slipped from the
    room"

exfiltrating
    Withdraw (troops or spies)
    surreptitiously, especially from a
    dangerous situation.

    "US special forces agents have all been
    exfiltrated from Iran"

paltry
    A paltry amount of money or of something
    else is one that you consider to be very
    small.

pestilential
    Annoying.
    "what a pestilential man!"

    "pestilential war"

ballyhoo
ballyhooed
    Praise or publicize extravagantly.

elegy
    A poem of serious reflection, typically a
    lament for the dead.

temper
tempering
    Act as a neutralizing or counterbalancing
    force to (something).
    "their idealism is tempered with realism"

pithy
    (of language or style) terse and
    vigorously expressive.
    "his characteristically pithy comments"

mistral
    A strong, cold north-westerly wind that
    blows through the Rhône valley and
    southern France into the Mediterranean,
    mainly in winter.

beholden
    Owing thanks or having a duty to someone
    in return for help or a service.

    "I don't like to be beholden to anybody"

syllogism
    An instance of a form of reasoning in
    which a conclusion is drawn from two given
    or assumed propositions (premises); a
    common or middle term is present in the
    two premises but not in the conclusion,
    which may be invalid (e.g. all dogs are
    animals; all animals have four legs;
    therefore all dogs have four legs ).

metonymy
    A figure of speech in which a thing or
    concept is referred to by the name of
    something closely associated with that
    thing or concept.

    For example, instead of referring to
    businessmen as businessmen, using metonymy
    you might refer to them as suits.

vaunted
    Praised or boasted about, especially in an
    excessive way.

    "they have utterly eclipsed their vaunted
    American rivals"

glib
    (of words or a speaker) fluent but
    insincere and shallow.

procurer
    A person who causes someone to do
    something or something to happen.

puritanism
    Seven months after gaming was outlawed,
    the Massachusetts Puritans decided to
    punish adultery with death (though the
    death penalty was rare).

    They banned fancy clothing, living with
    Indians and smoking in public.

    Missing Sunday services would land you in
    the stocks.

    Celebrating Christmas would cost you five
    shillings.

puritan
    You describe someone as a puritan when
    they live according to strict moral or
    religious principles, especially when they
    disapprove of physical pleasures.

appropriation
    An act or instance of appropriating
    something.

    Something that has been appropriated
    specifically : money set aside by formal
    action for a specific use the city's
    appropriation for schools.

forthcoming
    Ready or made available when wanted or
    needed.

dogma
    A principle or set of principles laid down
    by an authority as incontrovertibly true.
    "the dogmas of faith"

melee
    A confused fight or scuffle.
    "several people were hurt in the melee"

    A confused crowd of people.
    "the melee of people that were always
    thronging the streets"

enigmatic
    Difficult to interpret or understand;
    mysterious.

    "he took the money with an enigmatic
    smile"

fathom
    Understand (a difficult problem or an
    enigmatic person) after much thought.

    "the locals could not fathom out the
    reason behind his new-found prosperity"

eschewed
    Deliberately avoid using; abstain from.

athazagoraphobia
    The fear of forgetting, being forgotten or
    ignored.

factuality
    The quality of being actual or factual:
    actuality, fact, factualness, reality,
    truth.

semiosis
sign process
    Any form of activity, conduct, or process
    that involves signs, including the
    production of meaning.

banality
    The fact or condition of being banal;
    unoriginality.
    "there is an essential banality to the
    story he tells"

dearth
    Scarcity that makes dear (expensive).

    An inadequate supply.

    "A dearth of evidence."

    "Dearth of legitimacy."

efficacious
    (of something inanimate or abstract)
    successful in producing a desired or
    intended result; effective.

orrery
    A mechanical model of the Solar System
    that illustrates or predicts the relative
    positions and motions of the planets and
    moons, usually according to the
    heliocentric model.

expeditiously
    With speed and efficiency.
    "the directors will move expeditiously to
    reach a conclusion"

farcical
    Relating to or resembling farce,
    especially because of absurd or ridiculous
    aspects.
    "he considered the whole idea farcical"

subsist
subsisting
    Maintain or support oneself, especially at
    a minimal level.
    "he subsisted on welfare and casual
    labour"

predilection
    A preference or special liking for
    something; a bias in favour of something.
    "my predilection for Asian food"

scion
    A descendant or heir of a person of high
    social standing.

    "Apples no better than anyone else when
    it comes to UX They used to be held up as
    some sort of scion of user-interface
    design, but one particular component has
    just cost my partner a lot of message
    history data."

gobbledygook
    Language that is meaningless or is made
    unintelligible by excessive use of
    technical terms.
    "reams of financial gobbledygook"

peaceably
    Without violence or war, or in a peaceful
    way: We want the two states to exist
    peaceably side by side.

    They are peaceably exercising their right
    of free speech.

nevertheless
    In spite of that; notwithstanding; all the
    same.
    "statements which, although literally
    true, are nevertheless misleading"

deflationary
    Characterized by or tending to cause
    economic deflation.
    'the deflationary effect of higher taxes'

supple
    Bending and moving easily and gracefully;
    flexible.
    "her supple fingers"

supernumerary
    Present in excess of the normal or
    requisite number.

    A supernumerary person or thing.

antipathy
    Antipathy is a voluntary or involuntary
    dislike for something or somebody, the
    opposite of sympathy.

    While antipathy may be induced by
    experience, it sometimes exists without a
    rational cause-and-effect explanation
    being present to the individuals involved.

presupposes
    Require as a precondition of possibility
    or coherence.
    "their original prediction presupposed a
    universe only three billion years old"

    "...that presupposes it..."

interrogative
interrogative clause
    An interrogative clause is a clause whose
    form is typically associated with
    question-like meanings.

    For instance, the English sentence "Is
    Hannah sick?" has interrogative syntax
    which distinguishes it from its
    declarative counterpart "Hannah is
    coming".

malefic
    Causing or capable of causing harm or
    destruction, especially by supernatural
    means.

phantasm
    A figment of the imagination; an illusion
    or apparition.

aleatory
    Depending on the throw of a dice or on
    chance; random.

    Relating to luck and especially to bad
    luck.

honorific
    (of an office, title or position)

    [A title] given as a mark of respect, but
    having few or no duties.

recapitulate
recapitulating
    Summarize and state again the main points.

    "He began to recapitulate his argument
    with care"

pretext
    A pretext is an excuse to do something or
    say something that is not accurate.

    Pretexts may be based on a half-truth or
    developed in the context of a misleading
    fabrication.

    Pretexts have been used to conceal the
    true purpose or rationale behind actions
    and words.

apotheosis
    The highest point in the development of
    something; a culmination or climax.

    "his appearance as Hamlet was the
    apotheosis of his career"

    The glorification of a subject to divine
    level and most commonly, the treatment of
    a human like a god.

    Deification.

cisgender
    A cisgender person is someone whose gender
    identity matches their sex assigned at
    birth.

    For example, someone who identifies as a
    woman and was identified as female at
    birth is a cisgender woman.

    The word cisgender is the antonym of
    transgender.

    Related terms include cissexism and
    cisnormativity

cishet
    Cishet means someone is both cisgender
    and heterosexual.

    It could also mean both cisgender and
    heteroromantic.

    In other words, a cishet person identifies
    as the gender they were assigned at birth,
    and they're attracted to people of the
    opposite gender.

inveterate
    Having a particular habit, activity, or
    interest that is long-established and
    unlikely to change.

    "an inveterate gambler"

    synonyms:
        ingrained, deep-seated, deep-rooted,
        deep-set, entrenched, established,
        long-established, congenital,
        ineradicable, incurable, irredeemable
        Inveterate

    Firmly established by long persistence
    the inveterate tendency to overlook the
    obvious.

acquiescence
    The reluctant acceptance of something
    without protest.

discursive
    Moving from topic to topic without order :
    rambling gave a discursive lecture
    discursive prose.

    Proceeding coherently from topic to topic.

    In philosophy:
        Marked by a method of resolving
        complex expressions into simpler or
        more basic ones.
        Marked by analytical reasoning.

prediscursive
    Kristeva's theory of abjection provides us
    with an account of a 'pre-discursive'
    (that is, a bodily, affective,
    pre-symbolic) racism, a form of racism
    that 'comes before words', and that is
    routed through the logics of the body and
    its anxieties of distinction, separation
    and survival.

triage
triaging
    The process of determining the priority of
    patients' treatments by the severity of
    their condition or likelihood of recovery
    with and without treatment.

snow
    Mislead or charm (someone) with elaborate
    and insincere words.

    "they would snow the public into believing
    that all was well"

    "she'll expose you, when she snows you"

proctor
proctoring
    verb
    Invigilate (an examination).
    "18% of the faculty reported that graduate
    assistants frequently proctored exams"

invigilate
    Supervise candidates during an
    examination.
    "during exam week, all she had to do was
    invigilate"

alacrity
    Brisk and cheerful readiness.

    'she accepted the invitation with
    alacrity' synonyms: eagerness,
    willingness, readiness, enthusiasm,
    ardour, fervour, keenness, joyousness,
    liveliness, zeal, promptness, haste,
    briskness, swiftness, dispatch, speed

embezzlement
    Theft or misappropriation of funds placed
    in one's trust or belonging to one's
    employer.
    "charges of fraud and embezzlement"

scrutinizing
    Examine or inspect closely and thoroughly.

dissuaded
    dissuade /dswed/ verb persuade (someone)
    not to take a particular course of action.

    'his friends tried to dissuade him from
    flying' synonyms: discourage, deter,
    prevent, disincline, turn aside, divert,
    sidetrack, talk out of, persuade against,
    persuade not to, argue out of, put off,
    stop, scare off, warn off, advise against,
    urge against, advise/urge not to, caution
    against, expostulate against, dehort

lectern
    A tall stand with a sloping top to hold a
    book or notes, from which someone,
    typically a preacher or lecturer, can read
    while standing up.

    "Lovell, who received sustained applause
    and a standing ovation as he approached
    the lectern to begin his remarks, said he
    began to question his own existence,
    asking, \"How do I fit into what I see?\""

grassroots
    The most basic level of an activity or
    organization.

goad
    The goad is a traditional farming
    implement, used to spur or guide
    livestock, usually oxen, which are pulling
    a plough or a cart; used also to round up
    cattle.

    It is a type of long stick with a pointed
    end, also known as the cattle prod.

    The word is from Middle English gode, from
    Old English gād.

    "not meant as a goad to you"

goading
    Provoke or annoy (someone) so as to
    stimulate an action or reaction.

shill
shilled
shilling
    Ensnared, enticed, seduced, decoyed.

    "they've been shilled to believe"

    noun
        A person who poses as a customer in
        order to decoy others into
        participating, as at a gambling house,
        auction, confidence game, etc.

    Act or work as a shill.
    "your husband in the crowd could shill for
    you"

bristliness
    "Stallman... is a hard man to like. He is
    driven, often impatient. His anger can
    flare at friend as easily as foe. He is
    uncompromising and persistent; patient in
    both."

    Richard Stallman has an often extreme
    bristliness about him and an intense
    propensity for confrontation, which can
    repel many.

propensity
    An inclination or natural tendency to
    behave in a particular way.

regift
    Give (a gift one has received) to someone
    else.

absolution
    [#Christianity]

    A pronouncement of remission (forgiveness)
    of sins to the penitent.

burnished
    (especially of metal) polished by rubbing.
    "highly burnished armour"

socialisation
    [#sociology]

    https://opentextbc.ca/introductiontosociology/chapter/chapter5-socialization/

    How we learn the norms and beliefs of our
    society.

    From our earliest family and play
    experiences, we are made aware of societal
    values and expectations.

    The process of people following the norms
    and trends created in a society.

ephemeral
    Lasting for a very short time.

    "fashions are ephemeral: new ones
    regularly drive out the old"

inhibition
    A feeling that makes one self-conscious
    and unable to act in a relaxed and natural
    way.
    "the children, at first shy, soon lost
    their inhibitions"

zeitgeist
    "To be fair, this is actually pretty close
    to the zeitgeist during Star Wars'
    original release."

concession
    The act of giving up something or doing
    something in order to reach agreement.

    The act of admitting that you have been
    defeated in a contest.

    Something that you allow or do to end a
    conflict or reach an agreement.

extralegal
    Beyond the reach of the government.

flustered
    Agitated or confused.
    "a flustered commuter"

pilfer
    Steal (typically things of relatively
    little value).

    "A pernicious agricultural pest owes some
    of its success to a gene pilfered from its
    plant host millions of years ago."

planned obsolescence

stipend
    A fixed regular sum paid as a salary or as
    expenses to a clergyman, teacher, or
    public official.

regale
    Entertain or amuse (someone) with talk.
    "he regaled her with a colourful account
    of that afternoon's meeting"

amnesty
    Grant an official pardon to.

    An official pardon for people who have
    been convicted of political offenses.

exhume
    Dig out (something buried, especially a
    corpse) from the ground.
    "the bodies were exhumed on the orders of
    a judge"

maced
    Pepper sprayed.

    "Stop or you'll get maced again."

stipulate
    To make an agreement or covenant to do or
    forbear something : contract.

    To demand an express term in an agreement.

    To specify as a condition or requirement
    (as of an agreement or offer).

recess
    A brief period for relaxation between work
    periods The students play ball at recess.

    A secret or hidden place.

consign
consigned
    Deliver (something) to a person's keeping.
    "he consigned three paintings to
    Sotheby's"

coalesce
    Come together to form one mass or whole.
    "the puddles had coalesced into shallow
    streams"

    Combine (elements) in a mass or whole.
    "his idea served to coalesce all that
    happened into one connected whole"

prognostications
    The action of foretelling or prophesying
    future events.

abductive instinct

abductive reasoning

deduction vs induction vs adbduction
deductive vs inductive vs adbductive
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/deduction-vs-induction-vs-abduction

deduction
deductive reasoning
    Making an inference based on widely
    accepted facts or premises.

    If a beverage is defined as "drinkable
    through a straw," one could use deduction
    to determine soup to be a beverage.

induction
inductive reasoning
    Making an inference based on an
    observation, often of a sample.

    You can induce that the soup is tasty if
    you observe all of your friends consuming
    it.

abduction
abductive reasoning
    Making a probable conclusion from what you
    know.

    If you see an abandoned bowl of hot soup
    on the table, you can use abduction to
    conclude the owner of the soup is likely
    returning soon.

paunchy
    Having a large or protruding belly.

iniquity
    Immoral or grossly unfair behavior.

glum
    Adjective looking or feeling dejected;
    morose.

    (of a person) looking unhappy, gloomy, or
    sullen.

caricature
    A picture, description, or imitation of a
    person in which certain striking
    characteristics are exaggerated in order
    to create a comic or grotesque effect.
    "a crude caricature of the Prime Minister"

cossim
    As to give way/lose ground;
    bending/turning in; (turned) backwards;
    obliquely;

panacea
    A solution or remedy for all difficulties
    or diseases.

wary
    Feeling or showing caution about possible
    dangers or problems.
    "dogs which have been mistreated often
    remain very wary of strangers"

interdisciplinary
    Relating to more than one branch of
    knowledge.

discursive
    Digressing from subject to subject.

    "children's discursive skills"

ethnographic
    Relating to the scientific description of
    peoples and cultures with their customs,
    habits, and mutual differences.

complexify
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/261687570_From_Observation_to_Transcription_and_Back_Theory_Practice_and_Interpretation_in_the_Analysis_of_Children's_Naturally_Occurring_Discourse

busyness
    The state or condition of having a great
    deal to do.
    "it's easy to get caught up in the
    busyness of life".

    The quality of being full of activity.
    "the busyness and noise of the street".

    The quality of being excessively detailed
    or decorated.
    "the busyness of the interior design".

ideating
    Form an idea of; imagine or conceive.
    "he is part of a team that ideates
    branding strategies"

recant
    Say that one no longer holds an opinion or
    belief, especially one considered
    heretical.
    "heretics were burned if they would not
    recant"

muse
    A person who serves as an artist's
    inspiration.

tenacity
    The quality or fact of being able to grip
    something firmly; grip.
    "the sheer tenacity of the limpet"

flummoxed
    bewildered or perplexed.
    "he became flummoxed and speechless"

vertiginous
    Extremely high or steep.
    "vertiginous drops to the valleys below"

    Relating to or affected by vertigo.

    Causing or characterized by a sensation of
    whirling and a feeling of instability.

deign
    Do something that one considers to be
    beneath one's dignity.
    "she did not deign to answer the maid's
    question"

    Condescend to give (something).
    "he had deigned an apology"

    "he deigns to visit us"

staccato
    Performed with each note sharply detached
    or separated from the others.
    "a staccato rhythm"

    With each note sharply detached or
    separated from the others.
    "I find arpeggio playing is easily done
    staccato"

extempore
    Spoken or done without preparation.

    Said "extempouree".

subterfuge
    Deceit used in order to achieve one's
    goal.
    "he had to use subterfuge and bluff on
    many occasions"

devil-may-care
    [adjective]

    Cheerful and reckless.

    "light-hearted, devil-may-care young
    pilots"

construed
    Interpreted; construed.

    "that walking stick could be construed as
    a dangerous weapon"

mawkishness
    The quality or condition of being
    affectedly or overly emotional: bathos,
    maudlinism, sentimentalism,
    sentimentality.

    "Forgive my mawkishness"

have the chops
    If you want to achieve fame and glory by
    being amazing at something, you have to
    have great skillor chops.

    Chops is slang for the jaws or mouth.

exonerate
    (of an official body) absolve (someone)
    from blame for a fault or wrongdoing.
    "an inquiry exonerated those involved"

admonish
    Warn or reprimand someone firmly.
    "she admonished me for appearing at
    breakfast unshaven"

incursion
    An invasion or attack, especially a sudden
    or brief one.
    "incursions into enemy territory"

humanitarian
    Concerned with or seeking to promote human
    welfare.
    "groups sending humanitarian aid"

cronyism
    The appointment of friends and associates
    to positions of authority, without proper
    regard to their qualifications.

procurement
    The process of finding and agreeing to
    terms, and acquiring goods, services, or
    works from an external source, often via a
    tendering or competitive bidding process.

    Procurement generally involves making
    buying decisions under conditions of
    scarcity.

abrogation
    The repeal or abolition of a law, right,
    or agreement.

pertinent
    Relevant or applicable to a particular
    matter; apposite.
    "she asked me a lot of very pertinent
    questions"

loquacious
    Tending to talk a great deal; talkative.
    "never loquacious, Sarah was now totally
    lost for words"

mimetic
    The word is Greek and means imitation
    (though in the sense of re-presentation
    rather than of copying).

    Plato and Aristotle spoke of mimesis as
    the re-presentation of nature.

    Relating to, constituting, or habitually
    practising mimesis.
    "mimetic patterns in butterflies"

mimesis
    A term used in literary criticism and
    philosophy that carries a wide range of
    meanings, including imitatio, imitation,
    nonsensuous similarity, receptivity,
    representation, mimicry, the act of
    expression, the act of resembling, and the
    presentation of the self.

incontrovertible
    Not able to be denied or disputed.
    "incontrovertible proof"

untenable
    (especially of a position or view) not
    able to be maintained or defended against
    attack or objection.

    "this argument is clearly untenable"

summarily
    In a summary manner; without the customary
    formalities.
    "she was summarily dismissed"

agog
    Very eager or curious to hear or see
    something.
    "I'm all agog"

aghast
    Filled with horror or shock.
    "she winced, aghast at his cruelty"

incumbent
    Necessary for (someone) as a duty or
    responsibility.

bungled
    (of a task) carried out clumsily or
    incompetently.
    "a bungled bank raid"

gratuitous
    Done without good reason; uncalled for.
    "gratuitous violence"

rife
    (especially of something undesirable) of
    common occurrence; widespread.
    "male chauvinism was rife in medicine"

chauvinism
    The irrational belief in the superiority
    or dominance of one's own group or people,
    who are seen as strong and virtuous, while
    others are considered weak, unworthy or
    inferior.

    It can be described as a form of extreme
    patriotism and nationalism, a fervent
    faith in national excellence and glory.

male chauvinism
    Male prejudice against women; the belief
    that men are superior in terms of ability,
    intelligence, etc.

    "a bastion of male chauvinism"

pensive
    Engaged in, involving, or reflecting deep
    or serious thought.

    "a pensive mood"

peccadillos
    A small, relatively unimportant offense or
    sin.

misogynist
    A person who dislikes, despises, or is
    strongly prejudiced against women.

persevere
    Continue in a course of action even in the
    face of difficulty or with little or no
    indication of success.

    "his family persevered with his treatment"

gumption
    Shrewd or spirited initiative and
    resourcefulness.

    "the president would hire almost any young
    man who had the gumption to ask for a job"

internment
    The state of being confined as a prisoner,
    especially for political or military
    reasons.

    "he was threatened with internment in a
    concentration camp"

wanton
    (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate
    and unprovoked.

    "sheer wanton vandalism"

licentious
licentiousness
    A throwing off of sexual restraint; lewd
    character or behavior: The Hays Code tried
    to stamp out all lust and licentiousness
    in American film.

    Wanton disregard or transgression of laws,
    rules, or moral norms: Freedom entails
    responsibilities, or else it degenerates
    into licentiousness.

minutiae
    The small, precise, or trivial details of
    something.

contentious
    Causing or likely to cause an argument;
    controversial.

    "a contentious issue"

proponent
    A person who advocates a theory, proposal,
    or course of action.

    "a strong proponent of the free market and
    liberal trade policies"

sojourner
    A person who resides temporarily in a
    place.

pronunciation
    The way in which a word or a language is
    spoken.

    This may refer to generally agreed-upon
    sequences of sounds used in speaking a
    given word or language in a specific
    dialect or simply the way a particular
    individual speaks a word or language.

depressive
    Causing feelings of severe despondency and
    dejection.

mentorship
    The guidance provided by a mentor,
    especially an experienced person in a
    company or educational institution.

    "he is revered by his employees for his
    mentorship and problem-solving qualities"

reparation
reparations
    A theological concept closely connected
    with those of atonement and satisfaction.

    In ascetical theology, reparation is the
    making of amends for insults given to God
    through sin, either one's own or
    another's.

    The response of man is to be reparation
    through adoration, prayer, and sacrifice.

    "...to demand reparations from..."

raiment
    Clothing.

    "ladies clothed in raiment bedecked with
    jewels"

affright
    Frighten (someone).

    "ghosts could never affright her"

guile
    Sly or cunning intelligence.

    "he used all his guile and guts to free
    himself from the muddle he was in"

indignation
    Anger or annoyance provoked by what is
    perceived as unfair treatment.

    "the letter filled Lucy with indignation"

bewair
    Express great regret, sadness, or
    disappointment about (something).

    "men will bewail the loss of earlier
    freedoms"

dainty
    Delicately small and pretty.
    "a dainty lace handkerchief"

    Fastidious, especially concerning food.
    "a dainty appetite"

vesture
    Clothing; dress.

    "a man garbed in ancient vesture"

buttress
    Provide (a building or structure) with
    buttresses.

    "we buttressed the wall as it was showing
    signs of cracking and collapse"

    Increase the strength of or justification
    for; reinforce.

    "authority was buttressed by religious
    belief"

straddling
straddle
    Sit or stand with one leg on either side
    of.
    "he turned the chair round and straddled
    it"

    Similar:
        sit/stand astride
        bestride
        bestraddle
        mount
        get on

    Place (one's legs) wide apart.
    "he shifted his legs, straddling them to
    keep his balance"

    Stand, walk, or sit with one's legs wide
    apart.
    "the colonel straddled in front of the
    fire"

teleology
finality
    A reason or explanation for something as a
    function of its end, purpose, or goal, as
    opposed to as a function of, say, its
    cause.

    A purpose that is imposed by a human use,
    such as the purpose of a fork to hold
    food, is called extrinsic.

euphemism
    A mild or indirect word or expression
    substituted for one considered to be too
    harsh or blunt when referring to something
    unpleasant or embarrassing.

    "the jargon has given us ‘downsizing’ as a
    euphemism for cuts"

empirical
    Based on, concerned with, or verifiable by
    observation or experience rather than
    theory or pure logic.

    "they provided considerable empirical
    evidence to support their argument"

interstitial
    Of, forming, or occupying interstices.
    "the interstitial space"

    An advertisement that appears while a
    chosen website or page is downloading.

empiricism
    [#philosophy]

    A theory that states that knowledge comes
    only or primarily from sensory experience.

    It is one of several views of
    epistemology, along with rationalism and
    skepticism.

    Empiricism emphasizes the role of
    empirical evidence in the formation of
    ideas, rather than innate ideas or
    traditions.

discordant
    Disagreeing or incongruous.
    "the operative principle of democracy is a
    balance of discordant qualities"

    (of sounds) harsh and jarring because of a
    lack of harmony.
    "the singers continued their discordant
    chanting"

irk
irked
    Irritate; annoy.
    "it irks her to think of the runaround she
    received"

giblets
    The liver, heart, gizzard, and neck of a
    chicken or other fowl, usually removed
    before the bird is cooked, and often used
    to make gravy, stuffing, or soup.

    "the giblets of the brain" (deep within)

plutocratic
    Relating to or characterized by government
    by the wealthy.

gambit
    An act or remark that is calculated to
    gain an advantage, especially at the
    outset of a situation.

    "his resignation was a tactical gambit"

    (in chess) an opening move in which a
    player makes a sacrifice, typically of a
    pawn, for the sake of a compensating
    advantage.

    "he tried the dubious Budapest gambit"

whipsawed
    NLG: To be pulled in opposite directions.

    Cut with a whipsaw.
    "he was whipsawing lumber"

    Subject to two difficult situations or
    opposing pressures at the same time.

    "the army has been whipsawed by a
    shrinking budget and a growing pool of
    recruits"

dumb
    Unable to speak.

stupid
    Lacking in intelligence or exhibiting the
    quality of having been done by someone
    lacking in intelligence.

paraphrase
    A restatement of the meaning of a text or
    passage using other words.

    The term itself is derived via Latin
    paraphrasis from Greek παράφρασις
    'additional manner of expression'.

    The act of paraphrasing is also called
    "paraphrasis".

credence
    When something is given credence, it is
    made more believable.

    But it can also be used like this: Mary
    talked a lot about the poltergeist in her
    house.

    To most, her story had little credence,
    but I like a good ghost story, and so,
    decided to believe.

    "adds credence to"

love
    Four unique forms of love are found in
    Scripture. They are communicated through
    four Greek words.

    - Eros   - romantic love
    - Storge - family love
    - Philia - brotherly
    - Agape  - God's divine love
             - unconditional love
               Christians believe this is the
               highest type of love, and it is
               the love that Jesus has for
               humans.

    Eight types of love:
    These are actually dim-witted
    classificiations, in my opinion, as if not
    actual thought/discovery was placed into
    making this list.

    - Philia    - Affectionate Love.
                  Love without romantic
                  attraction and occurs
                  between friends or family
                  members.
    - Pragma    - Enduring Love.
    - Storge    - Familiar Love.
    - Eros      - Romantic Love.
    - Ludus     - Playful Love.
    - Mania     - Obsessive Love.
    - Philautia - Self Love.
    - Agape     - Selfless Love.

denigrated
    Criticize unfairly; disparage.

fortitude
    Courage in pain or adversity.
    "she endured her illness with great
    fortitude"

microcosm
    A miniature world or a small community
    that is a replica of a larger one.

defencelessly
    In a defenceless manner; without being
    able to defend oneself. "the defenceless
    animal was killed"

macabre
    Gruesomely or disgustingly tragic.

    "macabre tales of death and destruction"

lugubrious
    NLG: Expressing grief; mournful.

doleful
    NLG: Expressing or causing sorrow or
    regret; mournful.

gloomy
    (of weather) overcast or dull.

    "a gloomy day"

sombre
    Having or suggesting a dark or gloomy
    quality. "a sombre mood"; "a dark and
    brooding figure"

acuity
    Mental sharpness; quickness of mind.

apologists
    A person who offers an argument in defence
    of something controversial.

    "critics said he was an apologist for
    colonialism"

borking
    Obstruct (someone, especially a candidate
    for public office) by systematically
    defaming or vilifying them.

    NLG: (of a person or their work) subject
    to harsh criticism or derision. "the
    borking of the President in the press"

teleological
    PHILOSOPHY
    Relating to or involving the explanation
    of phenomena in terms of the purpose they
    serve rather than of the cause by which
    they arise.
    "teleological narratives of progress"

    THEOLOGY
    Relating to the doctrine of design and
    purpose in the material world.
    "a teleological view of nature"

    NLG: Of or relating to the philosophical
    doctrine of teleology, which is the idea
    that some things have a purpose or goal.

semaphore
    A system of sending messages by holding
    the arms or two flags or poles in certain
    positions according to an alphabetic code.

    "In a world where we semaphore our
    successes to each other at every possible
    opportunity..."

japed
    Say or do something in jest or mockery.

slight
slights
    Insult (someone) by treating or speaking
    of them without proper respect or
    attention.

    "he was desperate not to slight a guest"

attribution
    NLG: The act of assigning credit or blame
    to someone or something.

asshat
    A stupid or contemptible person.

asshattery
    The obnoxious behaviour of an asshat.

    NLG: Obnoxious, rude, or obnoxious
    behaviour.

equivocate
    Use ambiguous language so as to conceal
    the truth or avoid committing oneself.

    "the government have equivocated too often
    in the past"

enmity
    A state or feeling of active opposition or
    hostility.

    "decades of enmity between the two
    countries"

fluctuation
    An irregular rising and falling in number
    or amount; a variation.

    "fluctuations in the yearly values could
    be caused by a variety of factors"

precarity
    The state of being precarious or
    uncertain.
    "the precarity of the housing market"

    A state of persistent insecurity with
    regard to employment or income.
    "growing economic precarity"

bereft
    Deprived of or lacking (something).
    "her room was stark and bereft of colour"

    (of a person) sad and lonely, especially
    through someone's death or departure.
    "his death in 1990 left her bereft"

tryst
    noun or verb

    A private romantic rendezvous between
    lovers.
    "a moonlight tryst"

dasein
    A German word that means "being there" or
    "presence" (German: da "there"; sein "to
    be"), and is often translated into English
    with the word "existence".

    It is a fundamental concept in the
    existential philosophy of Martin
    Heidegger.

    Heidegger uses the expression Dasein to
    refer to the experience of being that is
    peculiar to human beings.

    Thus it is a form of being that is aware
    of and must confront such issues as
    personhood, mortality and the dilemma or
    paradox of living in relationship with
    other humans while being ultimately alone
    with oneself.

milieu
    A general, overarching attribute that
    gives context to a physical location or
    set of occurrences.

    Essentially, it describes the type of
    environment in which things happen.

    A milieu is made up of people, emotions,
    attitudes, and physical objects - really,
    anything that is significant to a setting.n

paucity
    The presence of something in only small or
    insufficient quantities or amounts;
    scarcity.

    "a paucity of information"

    Said "poor-city".

makeshift
    Acting as an interim and temporary
    measure.
    "arranging a row of chairs to form a
    makeshift bed"

factory settings
stock configuration
    NLG: A standard range of features or
    components that are fitted as standard to
    a car model.

indelible
    (of ink or a pen) making marks that cannot
    be removed.

eschew
    Deliberately avoid using; abstain from.

    NLG: To avoid or shun. "he eschewed the
    use of animal products"

affable
    Friendly, good-natured, or easy to talk
    to.

ingratiate
    Bring oneself into favour with someone by
    flattering or trying to please them.

    "a sycophantic attempt to ingratiate
    herself with the local aristocracy".

    "I haven't tried yet to ingratiate myself
    with that group".

abrogate
    Repeal or do away with (a law, right, or
    formal agreement).
    "a proposal to abrogate temporarily the
    right to strike"

    Evade (a responsibility or duty).
    "we believe the board is abrogating its
    responsibilities to its shareholders"

abeyance
    A state of temporary disuse or suspension.

    "matters were held in abeyance pending
    further enquiries"

curtail
    Place restrictions on.

    Reduce in extent or quantity; impose a
    restriction on.
    "civil liberties were further curtailed"

    Deprive someone of (something).
    "I that am curtailed of this fair
    proportion"

    "savagely curtailing"

confluence
    The junction of two rivers, especially
    rivers of approximately equal width.

    NLG: The flowing together of two or more
    streams.

craven
    Contemptibly lacking in courage; cowardly.
    "a craven abdication of his moral duty"

    Lacking the least bit of courage :
    contemptibly fainthearted

ablation
    Removal or destruction of material from an
    object by vaporization, chipping, or other
    erosive processes.

    NLG: The removal of part of a body by
    cutting, burning, or other means.

reciprocity
    The practice of exchanging things with
    others for mutual benefit, especially
    privileges granted by one country or
    organization to another.

    "the Community intends to start
    discussions on reciprocity with third
    countries"

    "reciprocity pact"

virtuosity
    NLG: The quality of having great technical
    skill, especially in music.

    NLG: The quality of being very skilful in
    a particular activity.

grassroots
    The most basic level of an activity or
    organization.

purport
    Appear to be or do something, especially
    falsely.
    "she is not the person she purports to be"

seminal
    Strongly influencing later developments.
    "his seminal work on chaos theory"

insipid
    Lacking flavour; weak or tasteless.
    "mugs of insipid coffee"

tantamount
    Equivalent in seriousness to; virtually
    the same as.

    "the resignations were tantamount to an
    admission of guilt"

    "is tantamount to"

mandate
    In politics, a mandate is the authority
    granted by a constituency to act as its
    representative.

    The concept of a government having a
    legitimate mandate to govern via the fair
    winning of a democratic election is a
    central idea of representative democracy.

consequential
    Following as a result or effect.
    "a loss of confidence and a consequential
    withdrawal of funds"

    Important; significant.
    "the new congress lacked consequential
    leaders"

abate
    (of something unpleasant or severe) become
    less intense or widespread.
    "the storm suddenly abated"

    make (something) less intense.
    "nothing abated his crusading zeal"

    reduce or remove (a nuisance).
    "this action would not have been
    sufficient to abate the odour nuisance"

putative
    Generally considered or reputed to be.

accrete
    grow by accumulation or coalescence.
    "ice that had accreted grotesquely into
    stalactites"

    form (a composite whole) by gradual
    accumulation.
    "the collection of art he had accreted was
    to be sold"

    (with reference to matter or a body) come
    or bring together under the influence of
    gravitation.
    "the gas will cool and then accrete to the
    galaxy's core"

untenable
    (especially of a position or view) not
    able to be maintained or defended against
    attack or objection.

amortise
    Gradually write off the initial cost of
    (an asset) over a period.
    "the vessel's owners could not amortize
    her high capital costs"

    Reduce or pay off (a debt) with regular
    payments.
    "eighty per cent of the proceeds has been
    used to amortize the public debt"

    Transfer (land) to a corporation in
    mortmain.
    "lands amortized without licence"

reify
    Make (something abstract) more concrete or
    real.
    "these instincts are, in man, reified as
    verbal constructs"

sensibility
sensibilities
    The quality of being able to appreciate
    and respond to complex emotional or
    aesthetic influences; sensitivity.
    "the study of literature leads to a growth
    of intelligence and sensibility"

    A quality of delicate sensitivity that
    makes one liable to be offended or
    shocked.
    "the scale of the poverty revealed by the
    survey shocked people's sensibilities"

interstice
    An intervening space, especially a very
    small one.

incredulity
    The state of being unwilling or unable to
    believe something.

faddish
faddy
fad
    Intensely fashionable for a short time.

    Being or in accordance with current social
    fashions.

trepidation
    A feeling of fear or anxiety about
    something that may happen.
    "the men set off in fear and trepidation"

confer
conferred
    1 : to bestow from or as if from a
    position of superiority conferred an
    honorary degree on her knowing how to read
    was a gift conferred with manhood Murray
    Kempton.

    2 : to give (something, such as a property
    or characteristic) to someone or something
    a reputation for power will confer power
    John Spanier.

attestation
    Evidence or proof of something.
    "their vocabulary is no attestation to
    your value as a parent"

    A declaration that something exists or is
    the case.
    "personal attestations and subjective
    claims only matter so much"

    The action of being a witness to or
    formally certifying something.
    "he failed to prove the attestation of the
    will by the witness"

perforce
    Used to express necessity or
    inevitability.

subversive
    Seeking or intended to subvert an
    established system or institution.
    "subversive literature"

cohort
    A group of people with a shared
    characteristic.
    "a cohort of civil servants patiently
    drafting legislation"

dogmatic
    Inclined to lay down principles as
    incontrovertibly true.

disabuse
disabused
    Persuade (someone) that an idea or belief
    is mistaken.
    "he quickly disabused me of my fanciful
    notions"

orthodoxy
    Is adherence to correct or accepted
    creeds, especially in religion.

heracy
    Any belief or theory that is strongly at
    variance with established beliefs or
    customs, in particular the accepted
    beliefs of a church or religious
    organization.

attrition
    Occurs when the workforce dwindles at a
    company, following a period in which a
    number of people retire or resign, and are
    not replaced.

    A reduction in staff due to attrition is
    often called a hiring freeze and is seen
    as a less disruptive way to trim the
    workforce and reduce payroll than layoffs.

exoneration
    Occurs when the conviction for a crime is
    reversed, either through demonstration of
    innocence, a flaw in the conviction, or
    otherwise.

    Attempts to exonerate convicts are
    particularly controversial in death
    penalty cases, especially where new
    evidence is put forth after the execution
    has taken place.

sensualist
    A person devoted to physical, especially
    sexual, pleasure.
    "a dedicated sensualist"

surmised
    Suppose that something is true without
    having evidence to confirm it.
    "he surmised that something must be wrong"

resolute
    Admirably purposeful, determined, and
    unwavering.
    "she was resolute and unswerving"

pivotal
    Of crucial importance in relation to the
    development or success of something else.
    "Japan's pivotal role in the world
    economy"

cursory
    NLG: (of a glance or examination) quick
    and hasty; not careful. "a cursory glance"

noir
noire
    A genre of crime film or fiction
    characterized by cynicism, fatalism, and
    moral ambiguity.
    "his film proved that a Brit could do noir
    as darkly as any American" a film or novel
    in the noir genre.

    You use 'noir' when you are describing a
    masculine noun, and 'noire' when you
    describe a feminine noun.

    The plural forms are 'noirs' for masculine
    words, and 'noires' for the feminine
    words. All forms are pronounced
    identically.

    "he says he's making a noir"

    E.g. max payne.

dual-use
dual-use technology
    In politics, diplomacy and export control,
    "dual-use" refers to technology that can
    be used for both peaceful and military
    aims.

    More generally speaking, dual-use can also
    refer to any technology which can satisfy
    more than one goal at any given time.

excise
    Cut out surgically.
    "the precision with which surgeons can
    excise brain tumours"

rescind
    Revoke, cancel, or repeal (a law, order,
    or agreement).

grassroots
    Something grassroots is at the most basic
    level of something, down there in the dirt
    with the roots of an idea or activity.

    The grassroots is the most fundamental,
    basic level of well, grass, but also ideas
    or political movements. Freedom is a
    grassroots value of America.

astroturfing
    The deceptive practice of presenting an
    orchestrated marketing or public relations
    campaign in the guise of unsolicited
    comments from members of the public.

    The practice of masking the sponsors of a
    message or organization to make it appear
    as though it originates from and is
    supported by grassroots participants.

    It is a practice intended to give the
    statements or organizations credibility by
    withholding information about the source's
    financial connection.

dispassionate
    Not influenced by strong emotion, and so
    able to be rational and impartial.
    "she dealt with life's disasters in a
    calm, dispassionate way"

recourse
    A source of help in a difficult situation.
    "surgery may be the only recourse"

    The use of (someone or something) as a
    source of help in a difficult situation.
    "a means of solving disputes without
    recourse to courts of law"

    "was my only recourse"

unequivocal
    Leaving no doubt; unambiguous.
    "an unequivocal answer"

unmitigated
    absolute; unqualified.
    "the tour had been an unmitigated
    disaster"

gall
    1 : brazen boldness coupled with impudent
    assurance and insolence had the gall to
    think that he could replace her.
    2a : bile especially : bile obtained from
    an animal and used in the arts or
    medicine.
    b : something bitter to endure.
    c : bitterness of spirit : rancor.

    "was an act of unmitigated gall"

rancor
    An angry feeling of hatred or dislike for
    someone who has treated you unfairly.

estranged
    (of a person) no longer close or
    affectionate to someone; alienated.
    "Harriet felt more estranged from her
    daughter than ever"

    (of a wife or husband) no longer living
    with their spouse.
    "his estranged wife"

$NOTES/glossary.txt
‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾

cat "$NOTES/ws/chemistry/resources/goldbook_vocab.json" | jq -r ".entries[].term" | pa -E colvs

https://mullikine.github.io/practical-macros-in-racket-and-how-to-work-with-them.html
https://mullikine.github.io/codelingo-vs-linters/main.html
https://beautifulracket.com/appendix/glossary.html
https://github.com/mullikine/rosie/blob/shane/doc/rpl.org
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_artificial_intelligence

$HOME/notes/watch/ne99laPUxN4/glossary.txt
$HOME/notes/tidbits.txt
$HOME/notes/glossary2.txt
$HOME/notes/models.org
$HOME/notes/algorithms.org
$HOME/notes/techniques.org
$HOME/notes/problog.org
$HOME/notes/correlations.txt
$HOME/notes/pathology.txt
$HOME/notes/ws/english/words.txt
$HOME/notes/ws/google-drive/BIOC 192 definitions Otago 2014.txt
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5QQkZnG6Y06Tm13QjVBQ1Bfc2c
https://radiopaedia.org/articles/batch-size-machine-learning
https://skymind.ai/wiki/thought-vectors
https://skymind.ai/wiki/deep-belief-network
$HOME/notes/ws/lists/functions/tensorflow.txt

TODO read and put into glossary
readsubs "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUTk3pyHIxY][Conditional Probability, Information, Entropy - YouTube]]"

P r e p r o c e s s
预处理

S y s t e m
系统

S h a n e
诗恩
    poetry
    giving

An algebra
    A set of values + a set of operators that
    those values are closed under and some
    laws it must obey.

discrete time
    Views values of variables as occurring at
    distinct, separate "points in time", or
    equivalently as being unchanged throughout
    each non-zero region of time ("time
    period")that is, time is viewed as a
    discrete variable.

Semantic segmentation

Computer Algebra
    [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_algebra][Computer algebra - Wikipedia]]

Distributed Data Pipeline
    Examples:
        Spark
        Flume
        Kafka

t-SNE
    [[https://distill.pub/2016/misread-tsne/][How to Use t-SNE Effectively]]

Graph reduction
    Implements an efficient version of
    non-strict evaluation, an evaluation
    strategy where the arguments to a function
    are not immediately evaluated. Wikipedia

Lexical context
    In languages with lexical scope (also
    called static scope), name resolution
    depends on the location in the source code
    and the lexical context, which is defined
    by where the named variable or function is
    defined.

Catenation
    This is what the word concatenation
    derives from, and the unix command 'cat'.

    The bonding of atoms of the same element
    into a series, called a chain.

    [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catenation][Catenation - Wikipedia]]

Distributional Hypothesis
    Words that appear in the same contexts
    share semantic meaning.

vector space
    [#linear algebra]

    A space consisting of vectors, together
    with the associative and commutative
    operation of addition of vectors, and the
    associative and distributive operation of
    multiplication of vectors by scalars.

inner product
    [#linear algebra]

    Associates each pair of vectors in the
    vector space with a scalar quantity known
    as the inner product of the vectors.

inner product space
    [#linear algebra]
    [vector space]

    Has an additional structure called an
    inner product.

Cosine similarity
    A measure of similarity between two non-
    zero vectors of an inner product space
    that measures the cosine of the angle
    between them.

    The cosine of 0° is 1, and it is less than
    1 for any angle in the interval 0, π]
    radians.

Euclidean norm
L2 norm

Euclidean distance
Euclidean metric
Pythagorean metric
    Bee-line.

    The "ordinary" straight-line distance
    between two points in Euclidean space.

    With this distance, Euclidean space
    becomes a metric space.

    The associated norm is called L2 norm.

Riffle
    The fancy shuffle thing.

    [[http://fredhohman.com/card-shuffling/][The Math of Card Shuffling]]

    You need 7 of them to fully shuffle the deck.

Actor model
    [#computer science]
    [#erlang]

    A mathematical model of concurrent
    computation.

    Treats "actors" as the universal
    primitives of concurrent computation.

    Defines some general rules for how the
    system's components should behave and
    interact with each other.

    The most famous language that uses this
    model is probably Erlang.

    Not related to:
    - Actor-critic [methods]

OAuth2
    This is basically a way for people to
    design encrypted interfaces to their
    software.

    [[/home/shane/go/src/golang.org/x/oauth2/jira/][oauth2/jira]]

    [[https://dev.bitly.com/authentication.html][Bitly API Documentation]]

Synchronicity
    Coincidence but not coincidence.

    But it's not a word which means nothing.
    If it exists because of the human
    condition then it should be recognised as
    a thing.

Axiom
Postulate
    A statement that is taken to be true, to
    serve as a premise or starting point for
    further reasoning and arguments. The word
    comes from the Greek axíōma (ἀξίωμα) 'that
    which is thought worthy or fit' or 'that
    which commends itself as evident.'

Euclid's 5th postulate
    Two lines converge within the area to the
    side of a 3rd intersecting line where the
    sum of their interior angles is less than
    180 degrees.

    or.

    If a straight line falling on two straight
    lines makes the interior angles on the
    same side of it taken together less than
    two right angles, then the two straight
    lines, if produced indefinitely, meet on
    that side on which the sum of angles is
    less than two right angles.

    [[/home/shane/dump/home/shane/notes2018/ws/math/euclids-5th-postulate.jpg][math/euclids-5th-postulate.jpg]]

Lisp Machine

Nuance
    Adding another dimension allows for more
    nuance.

Dimensions [in a data set]
Features
Predictors
Variables
    Synonyms.

Decision Tree
    A reasonably accessible (though
    rudimentary) machine learning method.

    Look at one variable at a time.

    vim +/"Weighted Neighborhood Scheme" "$HOME/notes/glossary.txt"

Negabinary
    [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_base][Negative base - Wikipedia]]

IPC
Instructions per cycle
    At descriptive attribute of a CPU.

Smoke test
    Preliminary testing to reveal simple
    failures severe enough to, for example,
    reject a prospective software release

Aragoscope
    A type of space telescope that uses
    diffraction to advantage, rather than a
    impediment.

Aragospot
    [[https://youtu.be/5RacK2VwqEk?t=134][Making an Aragoscope - YouTube]]

    Proof that photons do not travel like
    particles, they travel sort of like waves,
    and waves can curve around an object.

    It's actually the lense of the light
    source. You can add a cross in front of
    the light source and you will see this in
    the aragospot.

    Use a larger disk (than a coin to blot out
    the light) and you get more resolution.
    Cody uses a jar lid. You don't have to
    move the disk further away, only increase
    the diameter of the disk, but you have to
    move further back until you get an
    eclipse-like halo.

    Cody could use a metal lid as a lense to
    read "Cody's Lab" written on a torch very
    far away.

Orbiting rainbow
    [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIASPc89Sgk][The Future of Space Telescopes | Space Time - YouTube]]

diffraction limit
    The finest detail a light telescope can
    give us is with a diffraction limit, which
    increases with wavelength.

    So infrared has a disadvantage over
    visible or ultaviolet light.

    However, the diffraction limit gets
    smaller with increasing aperture size.

    What the James Webb Telescope loses due to
    concentrating on the infrared, it makes up
    for through sheer size.

electron gun
    Found in a cathode ray monitor / tv.

partial derivative
    δz/δy
    partial derivative of z with respect to y.
    going up-hill, δz is positive.

symmetries
    All symmetries in physics are approximate.

    [[https://youtu.be/X9mEhcPbGsM?t=404][Leonard Susskind Why do we Search for Symmetry? (Closer to Truth) - YouTube]]

proton
    A swarm of partons (little particles)
        [[https://youtu.be/6Waurx8e-1o?t=768][Leonard Susskind: My friend Richard Feynman - YouTube]]

        Because they are moving really fast,
        the internal motions are very slow!
            Amazing intuition!

        When the electron hits the proton, you
        see a frozen bunch of partons (a
        snapshot of the proton).

        This means you get to think of the
        system as frozen partons.

Standard Model of Elementary Particles
    [[/home/shane/dump/home/shane/notes2018/ws/physics/pictures/standard-model-of-elementary-particles.png][pictures/standard-model-of-elementary-particles.png]]

    bosons
        carry the fundamental forces.

    fermions
        comprise matter

        quarks
            comprise protons and neutrons

            cant exist in isolation

            up

            down
                heavier than up quark

        leptons

neutrino (little neutral one)

helicity
    [[/home/shane/dump/home/shane/notes2018/ws/physics/pictures/helicity.png][pictures/helicity.png]]

    Direction of spin relative to direction of
    motion.

reactive programming
event-driven programming
    [declarative programming paradigm]

    Concerned with:
    - data streams, and
    - the propagation of change.

Annus Mirabilis
    In 1905 Albert Einstein published four
    important papers, plus his dissertation,
    and set the stage for all of modern
    physics.

Getafix
    Auto-fix technology from Facebook.

    Applies hierarchical clustering to many
    thousands of past code changes that human
    engineers made, looking at both the change
    itself and also the context around the
    code change.
        Allows it to detect the underlying
        patterns in bugs and the corresponding
        fixes that previous auto-fix tools
        couldn't.

    Learns to fix patterns from past code
    changes.

    Because Getafix learns from past code
    changes, it also produces fixes that are
    easy for human engineers to understand.

    Uses
    - Clustering algorithm.
    - Analyzes the context around the
      particular lines of problematic code to
      find more appropriate fixes.

target variable
    The quantity to be predicted.

concept drift
    [#Predictive analytics]
    [#ML]

    The statistical properties of the target
    variable, which the model is trying to
    predict, change over time in unforeseen
    ways.

    Predictions become less accurate as time
    passes.

    concept
        Relates to the target variable (the
        quantity to be predicted).

        It can also refer to other phenomena
        of interest besides the target
        concept, such as an input, but, in the
        context of concept drift, the term
        commonly refers to the target
        variable.

concept drift detection

Keras
    [high-level API]

    Used for:
    - building and training deep learning models.
    - fast prototyping,

    Advantages:
    - User friendly
      simple, consistent interface
      optimized for common use cases.

      It provides clear and actionable
      feedback for user errors.

    Create new
    - layers,
    - loss functions,
    - state-of-the-art models.

Hamiltonian Monte Carlo
    [Markov chain Monte Carlo method]

    Obtains a sequence of random samples from
    a probability distribution for which
    direct sampling is difficult.

    This sequence can be used to approximate
    the distribution (i.e., to generate a
    histogram), or to compute an integral
    (such as an expected value).

    ewwlinks +/"Hamiltonian Monte Carlo" "https://medium.com/tensorflow/an-introduction-to-probabilistic-programming-now-available-in-tensorflow-probability-6dcc003ca29e"

gram matrix
Gramian
Gramian matrix
    (of a set of vectors in an inner product
    space)

    The Hermitian matrix of inner products.

    Used to compute linear independence.

        A set of vectors are linearly
        independent if and only if the Gram
        determinant (the determinant of the
        Gram matrix) is non-zero.

arrow of time
2nd law of thermodynamics
    disorder increases with time

convolutional layers
    Have weight matrix with specific shape.

extraneous
    Irrelevant or unrelated to the subject
    being dealt with.

convolution vs correlation
    convolution
        Linear operations on the signal or
        signal modifiers.

    correlation
        A measure of similarity between two
        signals.

    _difference
        the convolution process rotates the
        matrix by 180 degrees

automatic differentiation
AD
    Simultaneously manipulate values and
    derivatives.

symbolic differentiation
    Uses a collection of rules.

numeric approximation
    Uses a small value of h. While very
    simple, this method is often inaccurate,
    due to choosing either too large or too
    small a value for h.

CAP theorm
    Any distributed system can have:

    At MOST

    2 of the following three properties:

    - Consistency
    - Availability
    - Partition tolerance

    Proof
        [[https://mwhittaker.github.io/blog/an_illustrated_proof_of_the_cap_theorem/][An Illustrated Proof of the CAP Theorem]]

Extended Kalman filter
EKF
    The nonlinear version of the Kalman filter
    which linearizes about an estimate of the
    current mean and covariance.

weak learner
    [#ensemble learning]

    https://machinelearningmastery.com/strong-learners-vs-weak-learners-for-ensemble-learning/

    Models that perform slightly better than
    random guessing.

    See "Boosting".

strong learner
    [#ensemble learning]

    https://machinelearningmastery.com/strong-learners-vs-weak-learners-for-ensemble-learning/

    Models that have arbitrarily good
    accuracy.

Boosting
    [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsmT2y-ZoLA][Boosting - YouTube]]

    An ensemble meta-algorithm.

    Use a set of weak learners create a single
    strong learner.

    See "meta-algorithm".
    See "Ensemble learning".

Gradient Boosting
    [ML technique]

    Used in regression and classification
    problems.

    Produces a prediction model in the form of
    an ensemble of weak prediction models,
    typically decision trees.

XGBoost
Extreme Gradient Boosting
    [data structure]

    A 'boosted tree'; a variant of decision
    tree.

    Used for supervised learning problems.

    Also a gradient boosting library of the
    same name.
    - distributed

Gold master
    A final version of software ready for
    release to manufacturing.

Generative graphical model
Generative deep neural network

Hidden unit
Latent variable

Deep Belief Network
DBN
    A generative DNN.

    Composition
        Multiple layers of hidden units.
        - Connections between the layers.
        - No Connections between units within
          each layer.

    Unsupervised.
        Trained on examples without
        supervision.

    Learns to reconstruct its inputs.
        Probabilistically.

    It's layers are feature detectors.

    Can be further trained with supervision to
    perform classification.
        After being trained to detect
        features.

Release candidate 1
rc1
    It is a pre-release candidate.

    If I check out emacs-26.1-rc1, that would
    be older than emacs-26.1.
        [[/var/smulliga/source/git/emacs-mirror/emacs26][emacs-mirror/emacs26]]

Extreme learning machine
    Feedforward neural network.

    Used for
    - classification
    - regression
    - clustering
    - sparse approximation
    - compression
    - feature learning

    Composition
        1 or more layers of hidden nodes.

        The parameters of hidden nodes need
        not be tuned.
            (not just the weights connecting
            inputs to hidden nodes)

        hidden nodes
            parameters need not be tuned.

    can be randomly assigned and never updated (i.e. they are random
    projection but with nonlinear transforms), or can be inherited from their
    ancestors without being changed. In most cases, the output weights of
    hidden nodes are usually learned in a single step, which essentially
    amounts to learning a linear model. The name "extreme learning machine"
    (ELM) was given to such models by its main inventor Guang-Bin Huang.

Kohonen Network
Self-Organising Map
SOM

neural Turing machines
NTM

Differentiable Neural Computer
DNC
    [ANN]

    An outgrowth of NTM.

    NTM + attention mechanisms that control
    where the memory is active, and improved
    performance.

    Takes advantage of memory augmentation
    and, at the same time, the attention
    mechanism.

LSTM
Long Short-term Memory

Neural Turing Machine
NTM
    Combines the fuzzy pattern matching
    capabilities of neural networks with the
    algorithmic power of programmable
    computers.

    Architecture
        A neural network controller coupled to
        external memory resources, which it
        interacts with through attentional
        mechanisms.

        The memory interactions are
        differentiable end-to-end, making it
        possible to optimize them using
        gradient descent.

    An NTM with a long short-term memory
    (LSTM) network controller can infer simple
    algorithms such as copying, sorting, and
    associative recall from input and output
    examples.

    Inference
        They can infer algorithms from input
        and output examples alone.

        Specifically,
            An NTM with an LSTM network
            controller can infer simple
            algorithms such as copying,
            sorting, and associative recall
            from input and output examples.

Homomorphic encryption
    A form of encryption that allows
    computation on ciphertexts, generating an
    encrypted result which, when decrypted,
    matches the result of the operations as if
    they had been performed on the plaintext.

Probabilistic Polynomial-Time Algorithm
PPTA

Semantic Security
    A semantically secure cryptosystem is one
    where only negligible information about
    the plaintext can be feasibly extracted
    from the ciphertext.

    In line with "computational complexity analogue to Perfect Secrecy".

    In contrast to "Perfect Secracy".

Perfect Secrecy
    [concept]

    Given an encrypted message (or ciphertext)
    from a perfectly secure encryption system
    (or cipher), absolutely nothing will be
    revealed about the unencrypted message (or
    plaintext) by the ciphertext.

    Shannon theorem of perfect secrecy
        For a perfect encryption scheme, the
        number of keys is at least the size of the
        message space (number of messages that
        have a non-zero probability).

computational complexity analogue to Perfect Secrecy
    Cannot determine any partial information
    on the message with probability
    non-negligibly higher than all other
    PPTA's that only have access to the
    message length (and not the ciphertext).

Perfect Secracy
    The ciphertext reveals no information at
    all about the plaintext.

    In contrast to "Semantic Secracy".

Homomorphic encryption
    A form of encryption that allows
    computation on ciphertexts, generating an
    encrypted result which, when decrypted,
    matches the result of the operations as if
    they had been performed on the plaintext.
    The purpose of homomorphic encryption is
    to allow computation on encrypted data.

Sentiment Analysis
    The goal is to identify the polarity of
    text content.

Braket notation
    A standard notation for describing quantum
    states.

Quantum Mechanics
    The study of things that are:
    - really, really SMALL,
    - really, really COLD, or
    - really, really ISOLATED.

    Quantum properties
        Superposition [of spins]
        Entanglement
        Interferance
            Noise-cancelling headphones create
            interferance.

            Two types:
                Constructive
                Destructive

        We can exploit superposition in a quantum
        computer, but we can also use other
        properties, such as entanglement, or
        even interferance.

Compute
    As a noun, this is used like so:
        With libraries like JavaCPP, it's easy
        to push compute to native when you
        need to.

Permutation
    A rearrangement.

Sterling's approximation
    How big is a factorial.

    26! ~= (26/3)^26

XOR

    Appears to not be a digraph for this in
    vim.

Sentence Segmentation

Connectome
    A comprehensive map of neural connections
    in the brain, and may be thought of as its
    "wiring diagram". More broadly, a
    connectome would include the mapping of
    all neural connections within an
    organism's nervous system.

Cohort
    A group of people with a shared
    characteristic.

Statistical Machine Translation
SMT
    The use of statistical models that learn
    to translate text from a source language
    to a target language given a large corpus
    of examples.

Collaborative Filtering
Neighborhood-based CF
    The key trick is finding the neighborhood
    of (the set of users most similar to) the
    user.

Jaccard Similarity
    sim(A,B) = | r_A  r_B / r_A  r_B |

    Used as the 'kernel' is collaborative
    filtering.

    Ignores rating values.
        It only notices that A and B have
        watche some movies in common.

    Cosine similarity is better.

Cosine similarity
    The best way to compute similarity in
    collaborative filtering.

    It takes into account ratings.

    Treat unknown values (movies not watched)
    as 0.

    The problem with cosine similarity is it
    treats the missing ratings as negative
    ratings.

Centered cosine similarity
    Normalise the ratings of each user so that
    the sum of the ratings is 0.

    To do this, subtract the row mean from each value.

Thermodynamic Entropy
    Related to thermodynamic equilibrium.

    Related to the amount of hidden
    information based on thermodynamic
    knowledge only.

    So a rigid lattice is actually close to
    thermal equalibrium.
    It's not low *thermodynamic entropy*.
    It might be low *entropy* of a different
    sort (there is only one arrangement like
    this). There is a difference between
    thermal and non-theormal entropy.

Boltzmann machine
    Has a remarkable ability similar to
    dreaming. They were first introduced by
    Geoff Hinton and Terry Sejnowski as a
    model of the brain in 1983. They can
    discover patterns when they are learning
    from data. And when run in a closed loop
    they can generate or dream new examples
    based on what is has learned.

Semiring
    A set, R.

    Two binary operations
        Addition (+)
        Multiplication ()

    (R, +) is a commutative monoid with
    identity element 0
        (a + b) + c = a + (b + c)
        0 + a = a + 0 = a
        a + b = b + a

    (R, ) is a monoid with identity element 1
        (ab)c = a(bc)
        1a = a1 = a

    Multiplication left and right distributes
    over addition
        a(b + c) = (ab) + (ac)
        (a + b)c = (ac) + (bc)

    Multiplication by 0 annihilates R
        0a = a0 = 0

monoid
    [#haskell]
    [operation]

    It's not a type, it's a property of an
    operation.

    Monoids are more interesting.
    More applicable to helping us to write
    better code, especially in a parallel
    system.

    - break it up into small tasks,
    - spread that out to different workers.
      These are on different threads or in
      different machines.
    - Heres the key. The monoid lets you put
      them back together

associative operation
    Has 2 arguments. It's binary.
    It takes 2 values of the same type and
    returns a value of the same type.

gamma function
    Γ(x) = (x-1)!

    The gamma function is kind-of equal to the
    factorial function.

    Γ (z) = _0- t^(z1) e^(t) dt

    $DUMP$HOME/notes2018/ws/machine-learning/reading/machine-learning-cheat-sheet.pdf

Hierarchical feature detection
    Visual object classification is a type of
    application where this is very effective.

Neural Network
    Typically, the training cannot determine
    the architecture.

convNet
    Insight:
    In a convNet there are many more
    things to set, because layers are not
    fully connected.

    For each convolutional layer, the user
    must specify:
    - Number of filters
    - Size of the filters
    - The step size:
      How a given filter is shifted over
      the image map.
    - The padding:
      Whether filters extend beyond the
      edge of the image.

    For each pooling layer, the user must
    specify:
    - The size of the pooling window:
      The subsampling ratio.
    - The type of pooling:
      Max or average.

    Problems
    - Throws away location information.
      The order of features might be
      ignored. This makes them easy to fool.
    - Perform well only when test data is
      similar to training data, resulting in
      huge training set requirement.

Chaos
Deterministic Chaos
    When the present determines the future,
    but the approximate present does not
    approximately determine the future.

    Events that never repeat and vastly impact
    the outcome un unpredictable.

    An interdisciplinary theory.
    It states:
        Within the apparent randomness of
        chaotic complex systems, there are
        underlying patterns, constant feedback
        loops, repetition, self-similarity,
        fractals, self-organization, and
        reliance on programming at the initial
        point known as sensitive dependence on
        initial conditions.

    Chaotic behavior exists in many natural
    systems, such as weather and climate.

Tenacious
    retentive, recollective, long, tenacious.

    dogged, dour, persistent, pertinacious,
    tenacious, unyielding.

Lambda calculus
    A minimal, turing complete programming
    language.

    In lambda calculus, everything is an
    anonymous (i.e. nameless wink) function.

    The lambda-calculus is a minimal
    programming language.

meta-algorithm
metaheuristic
    A higher-level procedure or heuristic
    designed to find, generate, or select a
    heuristic that may provide a sufficiently
    good solution to an optimization problem,
    especially with incomplete or imperfect
    information.

Ensemble learning
Ensemble methods
    Use multiple learning algorithms to obtain
    better predictive performance than could
    be obtained from any of the constituent
    learning algorithms alone.

Weak learner
    A classifier.

    Only slightly correlated with the true
    classification.

    It can label examples better than random
    guessing.

Strong learner
    A classifier.

    Arbitrarily well-correlated with the true
    classification.

Hedge fund
    An investment fund that pools capital from
    accredited individuals or institutional
    investors and invests in a variety of
    assets, often with complex
    portfolio-construction and risk-management
    techniques.

Static analysis
Static code analysis
    A method of computer program debugging
    that is done by examining the code without
    executing the program. The process
    provides an understanding of the code
    structure, and can help to ensure that the
    code adheres to industry standards.

poll
"wait for"
    He process where the computer or
    controlling device waits for an external
    device to check for its readiness or
    state, often with low-level hardware.

    'poll' the operation [until it completes].

rope
    [data structure]

    Efficient for storing and manipulating
    very large mutable strings.

    Reduces memory reallocation and data copy
    overhead for applications that are
    constantly operating on very large strings
    by splitting them into multiple smaller
    strings transparently.

    Efficient random access is achieved via a
    binary tree.

Network Information Service
NIS

Lexical scope
Static scope
    A lexically scoped language means that
    whenever an identifier is used as an
    expression, something in the textual
    environment of the expression determines
    the identifiers binding.

    A convention used with many programming
    languages that sets the scope (range of
    functionality) of a variable so that it
    may only be called (referenced) from
    within the block of code in which it is
    defined. The scope is determined when the
    code is compiled.

System programming
Systems programming
    The primary distinguishing characteristic
    of systems programming when compared to
    application programming is that
    application programming aims to produce
    software which provides services to the
    user directly (e.g. word processor),
    whereas systems programming aims to
    produce software and software platforms
    which provide services to other software,
    are performance constrained, or both (e.g.
    operating systems, computational science
    applications, game engines and AAA video
    games, industrial automation, and software
    as a service applications).

SIG
Special Interest Group

SIGPLAN
    The Association for Computing Machinery's
    Special Interest Group on programming
    languages.

    SIG (special interest group)
    PLAN (programming languages)

arc
    https://youtu.be/nA6lwzh1Tbc?t=87

    Over-arching plot.

corroborate
    Confirm or give support to (a statement,
    theory, or finding).

interferametry
    Take signals from multiple telescropes and
    interfere their signals with eachother.

    The technique is used to combine multiple
    radio telescropes into a larger one.

[quantum] spin (of an electron)
    Is as intrinsic as mass and charge.

    Quatnum spin produces a dipole magnetic
    field.
        Like a magnet with 2 ends. It has
        magnetic field lines.

        Are the smallest lines at plank length
        though? -- maybe.

        (Despite not being the same as
        classical rotation).

    https://youtu.be/7UwigY4SjKY?t=212
        Rewatch this part -- it's amazing.

Electrons
    Have no size.

    See quantum spin.

swansong
    The final performance or activity of a
    person's career.

contiguous
    Sharing a common border; touching.

    Like consecutive, but physically.

Natural languages
    The languages people speak, such as
    English, Spanish, and French. They were
    not designed by people (although people
    try to impose some order on them); they
    evolved naturally.

Formal languages
    Languages that are designed by people for
    specific applications. For example, the
    notation that mathematicians use is a
    formal language that is particularly good
    at denoting relationships among numbers
    and symbols. Chemists use a formal
    language to represent the chemical
    structure of molecules.

    - strict syntax [rules]

Formal system
    Defined by a finite set of symbols and a
    some rules of inference.  A group of
    symbols arranged in an order of some sort
    is called a string. There are some strings
    in the formal system which are known as
    axioms. The rules of inference show us a
    way of creating or generating theorems
    from these base axioms.

Turing tarpit
    A language that aims for
    Turing-completeness in an arbitrarily
    small number of linguistic elements -
    ideally, as few as possible.

Currying
    Making a new function from ‘f’ by filling
    in some of ‘f’s arguments and allowing the
    rest to be provided later.

    An example of a higher order function.

    Currying is this whole "Functions that
    returns functions" scheme.

    So, when you f(x)(y) you are actually
    passing down 'y' to the 'f(x)' function.

    All functions in haskell take only one
    argument.

    foldl takes an argument and returns a
    function.

trampolining
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trampoline_(computing)

lexer
    A sequence of rules; each rule is a
    trigger and an action.

    (lexer [trigger action] ...)

    Remember, ... in racket is a kleene plus.

    Lexers in Racket are unusually powerful
    because the regular expressions used to
    describe classes of tokens may use
    non-standard regular operators like
    difference, complement and intersection.

regular operator
    An operator that a regular expression
    uses.

curiosity driven

policy
goal
objective

Linear Congruential [Pseudorandom Number] Generator
Linear Congruential Generator
LCG
    Pseudorandom number generator algorithm.

    An algorithm that yields a sequence of
    pseudo-randomized numbers calculated with
    a discontinuous piecewise linear equation.
    The method represents one of the oldest
    and best-known pseudorandom number
    generator algorithms.

NP-complete
    While it is easy to confirm whether a
    proposed solution is valid, it may
    inherently be prohibitively difficult to
    determine in the first place whether any
    solution exists.

Subset sum problem
    An important problem in complexity theory
    and cryptography.

    Given a set (or multiset) of integers, is
    there a non-empty subset whose sum is
    zero?

    Example,
        Given the set {7, 3, 2, 5, 8}, the
        answer is yes because the subset {3,
        2, 5} sums to zero.

        The problem is NP-complete.

    An equivalent problem is this:
        Given a set of integers and an integer
        s, does any non-empty subset sum to s?

    Subset sum can also be thought of as:
        A special case of the knapsack
        problem.

        One interesting special case of subset
        sum is the partition problem, in which
        s is half of the sum of all elements
        in the set.

monotonic function
    A function between ordered sets that
    preserves or reverses the given order.

    If it is either entirely non-increasing,
    or entirely non-decreasing.

superincreasing sequence
    A sequence of positive real numbers is
    called superincreasing if every element of
    the sequence is greater than the sum of
    all previous elements in the sequence.

monotonically increasing function vs superincreasing sequence
    In superincreasing the elements are
    greater than the SUM of previous elements.

    In a monotonically increasing function,
    the elements are greater than only the
    previous element.

PKCS #1
    The first of a family of standards called
    Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS),
    published by RSA Laboratories

Chinese remainder theorm
    A theorem of number theory.

    If one knows the remainders of the
    Euclidean division of an integer n by
    several integers, then one can determine
    uniquely the remainder of the division of
    n by the product of these integers, under
    the condition that the divisors are
    pairwise coprime.

    Discovered 3rd century AD by the Chinese
    mathematician Sunzi in Sunzi Suanjing.

    Widely used for computing with large
    integers.

    Allows replacing a computation for which
    one knows a bound on the size of the
    result by several similar computations on
    small integers.

    The Chinese remainder theorem (expressed
    in terms of congruences) is true over
    every principal ideal domain.

    It has been generalized to any commutative
    ring, with a formulation involving ideals.

Birthday Paradox
Birthday problem
    In a set of n randomly chosen people, some
    pair of them will have the same birthday.

    By the pigeonhole principle, the
    probability reaches 100% when the number
    of people reaches 367 (since there are
    only 366 possible birthdays, including
    February 29).

    However, 99.9% probability is reached with
    just 70 people, and 50% probability with
    23 people.

    These conclusions are based on the
    assumption that each day of the year
    (excluding February 29) is equally
    probable for a birthday.

    Real-world applications for the birthday
    paradox include a cryptographic attack
    called the birthday attack.

Birthday attack
    Uses the probabilistic model of the
    birthday problem to reduce the complexity
    of finding a collision for a hash
    function.

Expressive language
    Express more with fewer characters.

        "Hello world"

    vs.

        public class HelloWorld {
            public static void main(String[] args) {
                System.out.println("Hello world");
            }
        }

echo server
    A tcp server that just repeats back at you
    whatever you say to it.

non sequitur
    Formal fallacy, an invalid argument whose
    conclusion is not supported by its
    premises.

    Non sequitur (literary device), an
    irrelevant, often humorous comment to a
    preceding topic or statement.

thread-safe
    Concerns safety with respect to shared
    data.

pass-by-name
    The way lisp macros handle arguments.

    The body of a function is interpreted at
    call time after textually substituting the
    actual parameters into the function body.

linter
lint (plural)
    Tools that analyze source code to flag
    programming errors, bugs, stylistic
    errors, and suspicious constructs.

neutrino
    Only interacts with the weak force.

    It would take a lightyear's worth of lead
    to stop one.

Operational semantics
    A category of formal programming language
    semantics in which certain desired
    properties of a program, such as
    correctness, safety or security, are
    verified by constructing proofs from
    logical statements about its execution and
    procedures, rather than by attaching
    mathematical meanings to its terms
    (denotational semantics).

Reduction semantics
    An alternative presentation of operational
    semantics using so-called reduction
    contexts.

    A technique for formalizing an equational
    theory for control and state.

Syntactic form
    The core syntax forms that appear in a
    fully expanded expression.

PyonR
Pioneer
    An implementation of the Python
    programming language for the Racket
    platform.

Cryptanalysis
    The study of analyzing information systems
    in order to study the hidden aspects of
    the systems.

functional programming
    Avoids changing-state and mutable data.

    No state and mutation.

    There are times where the
    functional-programming approach doesnt
    fit, especially with functions that are
    used for their side effectsfor instance,
    println. So the rule of thumb in Racket is
    to use functional programming when you
    can, and depart from it when you must.

    I would argue to keep it separate anyway.

Functional parser
Parser combinator

Language Independent RPC

parser combinator
    A higher-order function that accepts
    several parsers as input and returns a new
    parser as its output.

Theorem
    [#Gödel's incompleteness theorem]

    It's not an obstacle to AI.

    ewwlinks +/"A theorem is any string" "https://www.sdsc.edu/~jeff/Godel_vs_AI.html"

    Any string which can be can be derived
    from the axiom(s) by applying zero or more
    of the rules of inference in succession to
    the axiom(s).

Consistency
    Consistency in a formal system means that
    every theorem [of the formal system], upon
    interpretation, comes out true (in some
    imaginable world).

Complete
    A formal system is complete if for every
    statement of the formal system, either the
    statement or its negation can be derived
    (i.e., proved) in the system. Hence a
    formal system is consistent if there is no
    statement such that the statement itself
    and its negation are both derivable in the
    system.

Godel's Incompleteness theorem
    All consistent axiomatic formulations of
    number theory include undecidable
    propositions.

    In simpler mathematical terms, any
    consistent formal system which can do even
    simple arithmetic is incomplete meaning
    there are true statements in the realm of
    number theory which can not be derived
    from the axioms of the formal system. This
    means that some statements even if they
    are true are not theorems of the formal
    system.

mutual recursion
    A form of recursion where two mathematical
    or computational objects, such as
    functions or data types, are defined in
    terms of each other.

abstract machine
    In academia, both Turing Machines and
    Lambda Calculus are examples of abstract
    machines.

clause
    a disjunction of literals.

Horn clause
    A clause with at most one positive
    literal. A Horn clause with exactly one
    positive literal is a definite clause

goal clause
    A Horn clause with no positive literals.

nuanced
    Characterized by subtle shades of meaning
    or expression.

convex compact set
    Describes a convex set that is closed and
    bounded.

    https://youtu.be/c4pgWd8V8HU?t=117

one-hot encoding
    Each word from the vocabulary is
    represented as a unique binary vector with
    only one nonzero entry.

    Not so great at representing words.

    Terrible for n-grams.

    Each vector has a size of the vocabulary
    (or even bigger in case of n-grams) which
    makes modeling difficult.

Quantum fluctuation
Vacuum state fluctuation
Vacuum fluctuation
    The temporary change in the amount of
    energy in a point in space, as explained
    in Werner Heisenberg's uncertainty
    principle.

    This is what annealing quantum computers
    use.

garnered
    Gather or collect (something, especially
    information or approval).

    "garnered some respect".

supplicant
    A fervently religious person who prays to
    God for help with a problem

    Someone who begs earnestly for something
    he or she wants.

    A younger brother entreating his sister to
    be allowed in her tree house could be
    described as a supplicant.

    An entity at one end of a point-to-point
    LAN segment that seeks to be authenticated
    by an authenticator attached to the other
    end of that link. The IEEE 802.1X standard
    uses the term "supplicant" to refer either
    to hardware or to software.

binary safe
    A binary-safe function is one that treats
    its input as a raw stream of bytes and
    ignores every textual aspect it may have.

    exec < <(p "$input") # binary safe
    exec < <(cat <<< "$input") # xxd -p <<< "foo" # not binary safe (appends newline)
    cat t.txt | xxd -p # 0a0a0a0a0a
    xxd -p <<< "$(cat t.txt)" # 0a # It appears <<< strips all remaining whitespace from the variable and enforces a single newline

magnum opus
masterpiece
    The greatest work of a writer, artist, or
    composer.

intolerable

ethereal
    Extremely delicate and light in a way that
    seems not to be of this world.

diagnostic
    Concerned with the diagnosis of illness or
    other problems.

    "a diagnostic tool".

compose key
    The key that allows you to enter alternate
    characters.

    On a mac this is the option key.

generative model

statistical classification
    Includes machine learning.

    Two main approaches
        generative approach
        discriminative approach

    These compute classifiers by different
    approaches, differing in the degree of
    statistical modeling.

VAE
    Estimates the Probability Density Function
    (PDF) of the training data.

    If such a model is trained on natural
    looking images, it should assign a high
    probability value to an image of a lion.

VAE
VAE model
    A generative model.

    An image of random gibberish on the other
    hand should be assigned a low probability
    value.

    Can also sample examples from the learned
    PDF, which is the coolest part, since
    itll be able to generate new examples
    that look similar to the original dataset!

reverse proxy

CRUD
Create, read, update and delete
Create, retrieve, update and destroy
    The four basic functions of persistent
    storage.

Kanban
    Lean method to manage and improve work
    across human systems.

    This approach aims to manage work by
    balancing the demands with available
    capacity, and improving the handling of
    system level bottlenecks.

The powers the be
    A phrase used to refer to those
    individuals or groups who collectively
    hold authority over a particular domain.

Bernoulli random variable
Boolean random variable
    May describe the event that __ has cancer.

Probabilistic inference
    The task of deriving the probability of
    one or more random variables taking a
    specific value or set of values.

    For example, a Bernoulli (Boolean) random
    variable may describe the event that John
    has cancer.
        Such a variable could take a value of
        1 (John has cancer) or 0 (John does
        not have cancer).

    DeepDive uses probabilistic inference to
    estimate the probability that the random
    variable takes value 1:
        a probability of 0.78 would mean that
        John is 78% likely to have cancer.

ideation
    The formation of ideas or concepts.

frisson
piloerection
    It coincides with the release of
    endorphines.

Meowlingual
    The name of the new company.

wavelet
    A mathematical function useful in digital
    signal processing and image compression.

    The use of wavelets for these purposes is
    a recent development, although the theory
    is not new.

    The principles are similar to those of
    Fourier analysis, which was first
    developed in the early part of the 19th
    century.

EMG
electromyography
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WtM1yz34co

Language interoperability
Language interop
    The capability of two different
    programming languages to natively interact
    as part of the same system.

geosynchronous orbit
    A band around the earth where satellites
    remain euoetill in relation to the earth.

textual

test fixture
    A fixed state of a set of objects used as
    a baseline for running tests. The purpose
    of a test fixture is to ensure that there
    is a well known and fixed environment in
    which tests are run so that results are
    repeatable.

higher-order languages
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11229-017-1502-0

adheres

corresponds

anaphoric
    The use of an expression whose
    interpretation depends upon another
    expression in context.

syntax optimisation
    I coined this.

    Once certain facts about a formal language
    are known, a DSL can be made around it,
    usually to automate / streamline the
    language.

Turnover rate
    The percentage of employees leaving a
    company within a certain period of time.

Test iteration time

Iterative testing
    The product is tested and changed
    repeatedly at different stages of
    design/development to eliminate usability
    issues before the product is launched.

In agile software development,
    iteration
        single development cycle

complement
    The thing that complements a set.

compliment
    A nice thing to say.

inosculation
    A natural or surgical joining of parts or
    branches of tubular structures so as to
    make or become continuousa.

affect
    impact

software forges
    - GitHub
    - Bitbucket
    - GitLab

Double rainbow
    https://youtu.be/OXDbc7QfTXU?t=320

    Alexander's band

Alexander's band
    Between the red from inner rainbow to the
    red from outer rainbow.

entanglement
    There are degrees of entaglement.

    https://youtu.be/aJM5Bkdzspk?t=285

misled

undecidable problem
    A decision problem for which it is proved
    to be impossible to construct an algorithm
    that always leads to a correct yes-or-no
    answer.

Automatic Differentiation
AD
    A technology for automatically augmenting
    computer programs, including arbitrarily
    complex simulations, with statements for
    the computation of derivatives, also known
    as sensitivities.

    A good explanation:
        https://alexey.radul.name/ideas/2013/introduction-to-automatic-differentiation/

    Uses:
    -   real-parameter optimization
    -   sensitivity analysis
        -   local sensitivity = (result)/(input)
    -   physical modeling
        -   Forces are derivatives of potentials
        -   Equations of motion are derivatives of Lagrangians and Hamiltonians
    -   probabilistic inference
        -   Hamiltonian Monte Carlo
    -   ML

Langarian mechanics
    No new physics are necessarily introduced
    in applying Lagrangian mechanics compared
    to Newtonian mechanics.

The Lagrangian (A mathematical function)
    A function of:
    -   the generalized coordinates,
    -   their time derivatives, and
    -   time

    It contains the information about the
    dynamics of the system.

Hamiltonian mechanics
    A theory developed as a reformulation of
    classical mechanics and predicts the same
    outcomes as non-Hamiltonian classical
    mechanics.

    It uses a different mathematical
    formalism, providing a more abstract
    understanding of the theory.

Hamiltonian
H
Ȟ
Ĥ
    [#quantum mechanics]
    [operator]

    The total energy of the system in most of
    the cases.

    Example:
        Total energy of a particle.

    Its spectrum is the set of possible
    outcomes when one measures the total
    energy of a system.

quasiparticle
    A group of particles that behave as if
    theyre one because their parts are
    interacting somehow.

superfluid
    Frictionless superconductor.

dogfooding
    When an organization uses its own product.

    Similar to "taste of your own medicine",
    except, if we're being precise, the latter
    is a bad thing where dogfooding is a good
    thing.

PascalCase
    Words created by concatenating capitalized
    words. An example is this page's title,
    PascalCase. Sometimes called
    "UpperCamelCase", or "DromedaryCase".
    Distinguished from CamelCase by the
    restriction that the first letter must be
    upper case. ("camelCase" isn't PascalCase,
    but "PascalCase" is.)

Concrete type
    Not an interfacea.

    Interface types provide contracts to
    concrete types.

    When you implement interface types into
    concrete types, you dont need to
    explicitly declare the interface type
    along with your struct definition.
    Instead, it will implicitly implement the
    interface types into your types at run
    time.

power set [of S]
    The set of all subsets of S.

DFA
Deterministic Finite Automatons

NFA
Nondeterministic Finite Automatons
    vimhelp NFA

NFA vs DFA
    They have exactly the same capabilities
    and limitations. The only difference is
    notational convenience.

SOLID
    Five guidelines for object-oriented
    computer programming.

    Improves:
    - understandability
    - flexiblility
    - maintainability

Dependency Inversion Principle
    High-level modules, which provide complex
    logic, should be easily reusable and
    unaffected by changes in low-level
    modules, which provide utility features.

LSP
Liskov Substitution Principle
    A concept in Object Oriented Programming
    that states:

    Functions that use pointers or references
    to base classes must be able to use
    objects of derived classes without knowing
    it.

Sphere Indexing
    http://donw.io/post/sphere-indexing/

Population inversion
    From statistical mechanics.

    Occurs while a system (such as a group of
    atoms or molecules) exists in a state in
    which more members of the system are in
    higher, excited states than in lower,
    unexcited energy states.

    It is called an "inversion" because in
    many familiar and commonly encountered
    physical systems, this is not possible.

    The concept is of fundamental importance
    in laser science because the production of
    a population inversion is a necessary step
    in the workings of a standard laser.

Cardinality
The degree of relationship
    The number of occurrences in one entity
    which are associated (or linked) to the
    number of occurrences in another.

    There are three degrees of relationship,
    known as:
        one-to-one (1:1)
        one-to-many (1:M)
        many-to-many (M:N)

a priori
    from the earlier

a posteriori
    from the later

Nautical twilight
    The second twilight phase. Both the
    horizon and the brighter stars are usually
    visible at this time, making it possible
    to navigate at sea.

    During nautical twilight, both the horizon
    and the brighter stars are usually
    visible.

AlphaZero
    Can crack any perfect-information game.

Rayleigh-Taylor instability
    An 'instability'.

    In an inverted cup of water, air pressure
    provides a force perpendicular to the
    water surface which means that around the
    ripples we no longer have a force pointing
    straight up.

    Even the tiniest of ripples may grow to
    the point where the water completely
    changes shape and it eventually deforms
    its way out of the glass.

Generative Model
    A powerful way of learning any kind of
    data distribution using unsupervised
    learning.

    All types of generative models aim at
    learning the true data distribution of the
    training set so as to generate new data
    points with some variations.

    I think it's just a more ambitious version
    of distriminative.

    Once you have a generative model, you get
    classification for free.

Approaches of statistical classification
    Two main approaches
    - Generative approach
    - Discriminative approach

    The classifiers are computed by different
    approaches. The approaches differ in the
    degree of statistical modeling.

Last universal common ancestor
LUCA
Last universal ancestor
LUA
cenancestor
(incorrectly) progenote
    The most recent population of organisms
    from which all organisms now living on
    Earth have a common descent. LUCA is the
    most recent common ancestor of all current
    life on Earth.

Progenote
    A hypothetical simple biological entity or
    organized system of a kind that could have
    included the evolutionary common ancestor
    of eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

Symmetry
    The idea that one aspect of a system can
    change while another remains constant.

    The idea of natural laws themselves, rely
    on the forms of symmetry that mean the
    same forces will apply to you as they do
    to me, independently of our position in
    space or time.

Annealing
    A heat treatment that alters the physical
    and sometimes chemical properties of a
    material to increase its ductility and
    reduce its hardness, making it more
    workable.

    Over time, finds rest / stabilises at a
    lower energy state.

Allegory
    A story, poem, or picture that can be
    interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning,
    typically a moral or political one.

posterior inference

Posterior probability distribution
    The probability distribution of an unknown
    quantity, treated as a random variable,
    conditional on the evidence obtained from
    an experiment or survey.

posterior probability
    [of a random event]
    [of an uncertain proposition]

    The conditional probability that is
    assigned after the relevant evidence or
    background is taken into account.

    "Posterior", in this context, means after
    taking into account the relevant evidence
    related to the particular case being
    examined.

    For instance, there is a ("non-posterior")
    probability of a person finding buried
    treasure if they dig in a random spot, and
    a posterior probability of finding buried
    treasure if they dig in a spot where their
    metal detector rings.

RISC-V
    An open-source hardware instruction set
    architecture based on established reduced
    instruction set computer principles.

Roko's Basilisk
    It's meant to be a terrifying thought
    experiment, but I really don't find it to
    be so.

transitive dependency
    A functional dependency which holds by
    virtue of transitivity.

    This is what I imagine it to be. Dependecy
    by proxy.

    Can occur only in a relation that has
    three or more attributes. Let A, B, and C
    designate three distinct attributes (or
    distinct collections of attributes) in the
    relation. Suppose all three of the
    following conditions hold:

    A  B
    It is not the case that B  A
    B  C

    Then the functional dependency A  C
    (which follows from 1 and 3 by the axiom
    of transitivity) is a transitive
    dependency.

Connected Components
    A hard clustering algorithm which finds
    clusters/islands in related/connected
    data.

    As a concrete example:
    Say you have data about roads joining any
    two cities in the world, and you need to
    find out all the continents in the world
    and which city they contain.

Celtic Blessing (Anon.)
    May peace guard
    The door of your house
    The door of your heart
    May the road rise to meet you,
    And the sun stand at your shoulder
    May the wind be always at your back
    And the rains fall softly upon your fields
    May life itself befriend you

anti-de Sitter space
    A toy universe.

    Physicists theoretical playground of
    choice.

    Works like a hologram.

    The bendy fabric of space-time in the
    interior of the universe is a projection
    that emerges from entangled quantum
    particles living on its outer boundary.

    This holographic "emergence" of space-time
    works just like a quantum error-correcting
    code.

Quantum Error Correction
    Explains how space-time achieves its
    "intrinsic robustness," despite being
    woven out of fragile quantum stuff.

    The language of quantum error correction
    is also starting to enable researchers to
    probe the mysteries of black holes.

Black hole
    Spherical regions in which space-time
    curves so steeply inward toward the center
    that not even light can escape.

    "Everything traces back to black holes,"
    said Almheiri, who is now at the Institute
    for Advanced Study in Princeton, New
    Jersey. These paradox-ridden places are
    where gravity reaches its zenith and
    Einstein's general relativity theory
    fails. "There are some indications that if
    you understand which code space-time
    implements," he said, "it might help us in
    understanding the black hole interior."

regimen
    A prescribed course of medical treatment,
    diet, or exercise for the promotion or
    restoration of health.

Galileo Galilei
    Italian astronomer, physicist and
    engineer, sometimes described as a
    polymath.

    Father of:
    - observational astronomy
    - modern physics
    - the scientific method
    - modern science

NSAIDs
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
    e.g.
    - ibuprofen

Nociceptive pain
    Caused by damage to body tissue.

    For mild pain:
    - paracetamol
    - asprin
    - NSAIDs
      + ibuprofen

Neuropathic pain
    Non-effective:
    - morphine
    - NSAIDs
      + ibuprofen
    - paracetamol

Chronic inflammatory pain

morphism
    A structure-preserving map from one
    mathematical structure to another one of
    the same type.

tremolo
    Like a trill but keys are further apart.

    https://fundamentals-of-piano-practice.readthedocs.io/en/latest/chapter1/ch1_topics/III.3.html#b-tremolos-beethoven-s-pathetique-1st-movement

Glissando
    Swipe your hand down the piano.

Non-deterministic operations
    Can have different results given the same
    input.

    Very common in imperative (in contrast to
    functional) programming.

macroid
    A function that acts like a macro.

    You can write these in javascript.

Turn Based Processing
    Single-threaded.
    Race free.
    Deadlock free.

The Law of Turns
    Never wait. Never block. Finish fast.

    - Events. Message passing.
      No threads.
      No mutexes.
    - Web browsers.
    - Most UI frameworks.
    - Servers: Elko, Twisted, Nodejs.
    - Asynchronicity can be hard to manage.

geodesic
    Basically, a straight line through curved
    space. E.g. an orbit.

posigrade
    Relating to, using, or being an auxiliary
    rocket that imparts additional thrust to a
    spacecraft in the direction of motion.

    e.g.
        2 feet posigrade.

arborist
    An arborist, tree surgeon, or
    arboriculturist, is a professional in the
    practice of arboriculture, which is the
    cultivation, management, and study of
    individual trees, shrubs, vines, and other
    perennial woody plants in dendrology and
    horticulture.

XPDL
XPath Derived Language
    Examples:
        XPath
        XQuery

smoking gun
    An object or fact that serves as
    conclusive evidence of a crime or similar
    act, just short of being caught in
    flagrante delicto. "Smoking gun" refers to
    the strongest kind of circumstantial
    evidence, as opposed to direct evidence.
    Direct evidence would include the entire
    action: Pulling the trigger, firing the
    gun, and the victim falling.

Data Science
    Drawing useful conclusions from large and
    diverse data sets through:
    - exploration
    - prediction
    - inference

Exploration
    [Data science]

    Identifying patterns in information.

    Primary tools:
    - Visualizations
    - Descriptive statistics

Prediction
    [Data science]

    Using information we know to make informed
    guesses about values we wish we knew.

    Primary tools:
    - Machine learning
    - Optimization

Inference
    Quantifying our degree of certainty:
    - Will the patterns that we found in our
      data also appear in new observations?
    - How accurate are our predictions?

    Primary tools:
    - statistical tests
    - models

alternation
    The repeated occurrence of two things in
    turn.

[subjective] evil
    Anything that keeps one away from their
    inner-heart and thus from their soul.

    "Through emptiness - evil expresses."

    Evil can only be 'disguised' if we do not
    know what we are looking for.

provisioning
    The process of preparing and equipping a
    network to allow it to provide new
    services to its users

    CIO typically manages provisioning.

    - Give users access to data repositories
      or grant authorization to systems,
      network applications and databases based
      on a unique user identity.
    - Appropriate for their use hardware
      resources, such as computers, mobile
      phones and pagers.

Flow control
    The process of managing the rate of data
    transmission between two nodes to prevent
    a fast sender from overwhelming a slow
    receiver.

    Not to be confused with control flow.

Control flow
Flow of control
    The order in which individual statements,
    instructions or function calls of an
    imperative program are executed or
    evaluated.

    Not to be confused with flow control.

LASER
Language-Agnostic SEntence Representations
    Toolkit.

    Provides:
    - Universal, language-agnostic sentence
      embeddings

    Uses:
    - Zero-shot transfer across 93 languages
    - strong results in cross-lingual document
      classification (MLDoc corpus)

    See:
    vim +/"^LASER" "$HOME/notes2018/ws/nlp-natural-language-processing/glossary.txt"

Feature set
    The set of all the attributes that you're
    interested in.

Forward selection
    An approach to feature selection, which is
    a type of dimensionality reduction.

    - Efficient for choosing a small subset of
      the features.
    - Misses features whose usefulness
      requires other features (feature
      synergy) .

Backward elimination
    An approach to feature selection, which is
    a type of dimensionality reduction.

    - Efficient for discarding a small subset
      of the features.
    - Preserves features whose usefulness
      requires other features.

hill-climbing
hill-climbing search
    [optimization technique]
    [iterative algorithm]

    Finding the maximum of a function.

    Belongs to the family of local search.

    Starts with an arbitrary solution to a
    problem, then attempts to find a better
    solution by making an incremental change
    to the solution.

    If the change produces a better solution,
    another incremental change is made to the
    new solution, and so on until no further
    improvements can be found.

    For example, hill climbing can be applied
    to the travelling salesman problem.

    It is easy to find an initial solution
    that visits all the cities but will likely
    be very poor compared to the optimal
    solution.

    The algorithm starts with such a solution
    and makes small improvements to it, such
    as switching the order in which two cities
    are visited.

    Eventually, a much shorter route is likely
    to be obtained.

Forward selection vs. backward elimination
    http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~dpage/cs760/DimensionalityReduction.pdf

    Both use a hill-climbing search.

Feature selection
    Equivalent to projecting feature space to
    a lower dimensional subspace perpendicular
    to removed feature

Dimensionality reduction
Generalisation (loosely)
    A broader class of projections including:
    + feature selection
      - forward selection
      - backward elemination
    + PCA

    PCA re-represents data using linear
    combinations of original features, so it's
    not a feature selection technique, but IS
    a technique used to perform dimensionality
    reduction.

    Examples:
    + t-SNE
    + PCA
    + LSA
    + SVD
    + LDA

Sequence-to-sequence processing
Neural machine translation
    An encoder/decoder approach.

gimbal
    A pivoted support that allows the rotation
    of an object about a single axis.

Gimbal lock
    The loss of one degree of freedom in a
    three-dimensional, three-gimbal mechanism
    that occurs when the axes of two of the
    three gimbals are driven into a parallel
    configuration, "locking" the system into
    rotation in a degenerate two-dimensional
    space.

    The word lock is misleading: no gimbal is
    restrained.

fermion
    could be either
    - an elementary particles
      such as an electron
    - a composite particle
      such as a proton

Spin-statistics theorem
    [#any reasonable relativistic quantum
    field theory]

    - particles with integer spin are bosons,
    - particles with half-integer spin are
      fermions.

Referential transparency
    A property of a function.

    The function will always give the same
    result for a set of parameters no matter
    when it is called.

Pure functions
    Thread safety
        A pure function with value parameters
        is completely thread safe.
    Reusability
        It is much easier to transplant a pure
        function to a new environment.

        How many times have you known there
        was some code that does what you need
        in another system, but extricating it
        from all of its environmental
        assumptions was more work than just
        writing it over?
    Testability
        Referential transparency

multivariate data

anomaly detection
outlier detection
    [#data mining]

    The identification of rare items, events
    or observations which raise suspicions by
    differing significantly from the majority
    of the data.

Unsupervised anomaly detection
    Detect anomalies in an unlabeled test data
    set under the assumption that the majority
    of the instances in the data set are
    normal by looking for instances that seem
    to fit least to the remainder of the data
    set.

Supervised anomaly detection
    Require a data set that has been labeled
    as "normal" and "abnormal" and involves
    training a classifier.

Semi-supervised anomaly detection
    Construct a model representing normal
    behavior from a given normal training data
    set, and then test the likelihood of a
    test instance to be generated by the
    learnt model.

Delta Debugging
    A methodology to automate the debugging of
    programs using a scientific approach of
    hypothesis-trial-result loop.

    - hypothesis
    - trial
    - result

anchor
    [#regex]

    - \b
    - \< (vim)
    - \> (vim)

terminal nodes
leaf nodes

Game Tree
    Each node of a game tree represents a
    particular state in a game.

    The nomenclature is very similar to
    decision trees wherein the terminal nodes
    are called leaf nodes.

Tree Search Algorithms
    Uninformed Search
    Best First Search
    Minimax

Quasar
    Only every found as the ulra-bright core
    of an extremely distant galaxy.

random sampling
    [basic sampling technique]

    We select a group of subjects (a sample)
    for study from a larger group (a
    population).

    Each individual is chosen entirely by
    chance and each member of the population
    has an equal chance of being included in
    the sample.

Monte Carlo Tree Search
MCTS
    [heuristic tree search algorithm]

    Application
        Some kinds of decision processes, most
        notably those employed in game play.

    Focus
        The analysis of the most promising
        moves, expanding the search tree based
        on random sampling of the search
        space.

    Essence
        Bias the choice of child nodes,
        letting the game tree expand towards
        the most promising moves.

    Each round consists of 4 steps:
    + Selection

      - Start from root R
      - elect successive child nodes until a
        leaf node L is reached.

      The root is the current game state and a
      leaf is any node from which no
      simulation (playout) has yet been
      initiated.

    + Expansion

      Unless L ends the game decisively (e.g.
      win/loss/draw) for either player, create
      one (or more) child nodes and choose
      node C from one of them.

      Child nodes are any valid moves from the
      game position defined by L.

    + Simulation

      Complete one random playout from node C.

      This step is sometimes also called
      playout or rollout.

      A playout may be as simple as choosing
      uniform random moves until the game is
      decided (for example in chess, the game
      is won, lost, or drawn).

    + Backpropagation

      Use the result of the playout to update
      information in the nodes on the path
      from C to R.

Impressment
    The taking of men into a military or naval
    force by compulsion, with or without
    notice.

Travelling Salesman Problem
TSP
    Given a list of cities and the distances
    between each pair of cities, what is the
    shortest possible route that visits each
    city and returns to the origin city?

    - NP-hard problem in combinatorial
      optimization, important in operations
      research and theoretical computer
      science.

Hopfield Network
    Can solve the Travelling Salesman Problem.

false dichotomy
false dilemma
    A type of informal fallacy in which
    something is falsely claimed to be an
    "either/or" situation, when in fact there
    is at least one additional option. A false
    dilemma can arise intentionally, when a
    fallacy is used in an attempt to force a
    choice or outcome.

    A dichotomy that is not jointly exhaustive
    (there are other alternatives), or that is
    not mutually exclusive (the alternatives
    overlap), or that is possibly neither.

    The presentation of two opposing
    conditions or views that do not properly
    represent all options.

Riviera
    A coastal region with a subtropical
    climate and vegetation.

[humid] subtropical
    [#climate]

    - Hot and humid summers.
    - Mild winters.

authoritarian
    Favouring or enforcing strict obedience to
    authority at the expense of personal
    freedom.

thermodynamics
    The study of the relationship of all forms
    of energy in the universe.

Jacques Hadamard
    Jacques Salomon Hadamard ForMemRS was a
    French mathematician who made major
    contributions in number theory, complex
    function theory, differential geometry and
    partial differential equations

hadamard product
    A binary operation that takes two matrices
    of the same dimensions and produces
    another matrix where each element i, j is
    the product of elements i, j of the
    original two matrices.

    It should not be confused with the more
    common matrix product.

smoke alarm
    has 3 beeps

CO alarm
carbon monoxide alarm
    has 4 beeps, faster

URL
    https://danielmiessler.com/study/url-uri/

URI
    danielmiessler.com/study/url-uri/

cohort
    A group of subjects who share a defining
    characteristic.

Image segmentation
    A computer vision task in which we label
    specific regions of an image according to
    what's being shown.

Semantic image segmentation

Business logic
    The programming that manages communication
    between an end user interface and a
    database.

    The main components of business logic are
    business rules and workflows.

1st order optimisation problem
    Requires us to comptute the 1st
    derivative.

2nd order optimisation problem
    Requires us to comptute the 2nd
    derivative.

Logistic Regression vs Linear Regression
    Key difference is that Linear Regression
    predicts a continuous outcome.

    Logistic Regression computes a discrete
    outcome.

Hessian
    A matrix of second order partial
    derivatives (the derivative of the
    derivative).

    Those are derivatives of the weights /
    coefficients.

Covariance
    Positive means moves in the same
    direction.

Stochastic [process]
    Can't be predicted.
    Opposite of deterministic.

Word Map

distributed word representations
neural word embeddings

model
    Prediction is made from the input.

    Examples:
    - linear model; a linear combination of
      weighted input features.

parameters
    The undetermined part that we need to
    learn from data.

Model fitness

Fitness Function
Fitness criteria
Cost function
Loss function
objective function
reward function
profit function
utility function
    http://www.deeplearningpatterns.com/doku.php?id=fitness

    Lots of terms for the same thing!

Objective Function
    Measures how well the model fit the
    training data.

    Consists of 2 parts:
    - Training Loss
    - Regularization

Model fitting
    The essence of machine learning.

    A measure of how well a machine learning
    model generalizes to similar data to that
    on which it was trained.

    A model that is well-fitted produces more
    accurate outcomes, a model that is
    overfitted matches the data too closely,
    and a model that is underfitted doesn't
    match closely enough.

    Examples
        Fit a neural language model with a
        learned embedding and an LSTM hidden
        layer.

Word-level Neural Language Model

Word-level Prediction

Word-level networks
    [type of neural network]

    Each word in the sentence is translated
    into a set of numbers before being fed
    into the neural network.

    These numbers change over time while the
    neural net trains itself, encoding unique
    properties such as the semantics and
    contextual information for each word.

Explicit Density Model
    vs Implicit Density Model

Implicit Density Model
    vs Explicit Density Model

tractable
    - (of a person)
      Easy to control or influence.

    - (of a situation or problem)
      Easy to deal with.

tractable density
    vs intractable density

intractable density
    vs tractable density

Combinatorial complexity
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uQCgss-aB4

Earth Mover Distance
EMD

Optimal Substructure
    Property of a problem.

    If it can be solved optimally by breaking
    it into sub-problems and then recursively
    finding the optimal solutions to the
    sub-problems, then it is said to have
    optimal substructure.

Auto-regressive Network
    DeepMind seems to be enamored with this.

    Examples
    - WaveNet
    - PixelRNN
    - PixelCNN
    - ByteNet

    Radical departure from more traditional
    CNN networks and has remarkably different
    behaviour.

    Type of Generative Network.

    Beauty
    - The same formulation applies to one
      dimensional, two dimensional and higher
      dimensional domains:

Crenelations
    The solid widths between the crenels are
    called merlons. A wall with battlements is
    said to be crenelated or embattled.
    Battlements on walls have protected
    walkways    (chemin de ronde) behind them.
    On tower or building tops, the (often
    flat) roof is    used as the protected
    fighting platform.

Batch gradient descent
Vanilla gradient descent
    Computes the gradient of the cost function
    w.r.t. to the parameters θ.

faceted search
    A count of attributes.

    Example,
        eCommerce sites use facets to tell
        customers how many items of a specific
        model, size, color, and other
        attributes are found)

solr
    Probably a better search engine that
    sphinx.

    Sphinx vs Solr, or Solr vs Sphinx, or
    Sphinx vs Elasticsearch as they all are
    decent competitors, with almost equal
    performance, scalability, and features.

    It uses Apache Lucene, probably even the
    query language.

    Though I should probably stick with
    ElasticSearch.

Overloaded Function
Function overloading
    The ability to create multiple functions
    of the same name with different
    implementations.

This, that
    The 'demonstrative'.

    Type of 'determiner'.

The
    The 'definite article'.

    Type of 'determiner'.

determiner
    Common kinds of determiners include
    definite and indefinite articles (like the
    English the and a or an), demonstratives
    (this and that), possessive determiners
    (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and
    several), numerals, distributive
    determiners (each, any), and interrogative
    determiners (which).

modal verb
    Examples
    - will

    They have various uses, including the
    expression of propositions about the
    future.

poincare duality [theorem]
    A basic result on the structure of the
    homology and cohomology groups of
    manifolds. It states that if M is an
    n-dimensional oriented closed manifold
    (compact and without boundary), then the
    kth cohomology group of M is isomorphic to
    the (n  k)th homology group of M, for all
    integers k

    Holds for any coefficient ring, so long as
    one has taken an orientation with respect
    to that coefficient ring;
        in particular, since every manifold
        has a unique orientation mod 2,
        Poincar duality holds mod 2 without
        any assumption of orientation.

Adam
Adaptive Moment Estimation
   Another method that computes adaptive
   learning rates for each parameter.

   In addition to storing an exponentially
   decaying average of past squared gradients
   v_t like Adadelta and RMSprop, Adam also
   keeps an exponentially decaying average of
   past gradients m_t, similar to momentum.

   Whereas momentum can be seen as a ball
   running down a slope, Adam behaves like a
   heavy ball with friction, which thus
   prefers flat minima in the error surface.

   We compute the decaying averages of past
   and past squared gradients m_t and v_t
   respectively.

jsonnet
    A simple extension of JSON.

pyro
    Built on pytorch.

Residual Network
    It's so simple that it's a type of
    network.  Is your X network also a
    Residual Network?

    Feed into the next layer:
    - output of previous layer
    - input of previous layer
      This is the new idea.

    Solved the vanishing gradient problem.

    Very good for ImageNet classification.
    Beat GoogleNet. Beat everything else.

    Able to be trained up to 1000 layers deep
    while avoiding vanishing gradients.

    The only difference is that instead of
    feeding only the output into the next
    layer, you feed also the input into the
    next layer.

Vanishing Gradient
    That lower accuracy that occurs with
    deeper networks.

inadmissible
    Not accepted as valid.

    (especially of evidence in court)

Euler's Method
    A numerical method to solve first order
    first degree differential equation with a
    given initial value.

    The Euler method often serves as the basis
    to construct more complex methods, e.g.,
    predictor-corrector method.

Differentiable Programming
    A shift opposite from the direction taken
    by deep learning;
    - from increasingly heavily parameterised
      models to simpler ones that take more
      advantage of problem structure.

Monte Carlo Analysis
    Applications
    - risk analysis

    Builds models of possible results by
    substituting a range of values (a
    probability distribution) for any factor
    that has inherent uncertainty.

    It then calculates results over and over,
    each time using a different set of random
    values from the probability functions.

[theory of] quantum gravity
    Unites Quantum Physics with General
    Relativity.

    Answers the question:
        What's the gravitational pull of a
        particle in a quantum superposition?

nix [package manager]
    https://chris-martin.org/2017/nix-for-stack-users

    Think of Nix like Stack, but with a much
    broader scope.

    Stack is there to manage your project's
    dependencies, and help you run their
    programs and compile stuff with them, but
    only if the dependencies are Haskell
    packages.

    Nix dependencies can be... kinda any
    software at all.

    Nix and Stack work together nicely. When
    you enable Nix integration for Stack, you
    can add any software as a dependency of
    your Stack project.

nix-shell
    Like "stack exec".

C
    To be able to know the address of a
    variable is of paramount importance.

Memory layout of a process
    | Stack    | Stores temporary variables
    | program? |
    | Heap     | Stores global variables
    | Code     |

Variable placeholder
    printf("The address of test is %d");

FILO
First in, last out.

Stack
    FILO

etc
    As a footnote, I just received email from Dennis Ritchie
    stating:

    I assure you that the original contents of /etc
    were the "et cetera" that didn't seem to fit elsewhere.
    Other variants might do their own etymologies differently.

    Regards,
    Dennis

    ---
    Peter H. Salus

amortized
    Gradually write off the initial cost of
    (an asset) over a period.

Refinement type
    [type theory]

    A type endowed with a predicate which is
    assumed to hold for any element of the
    refined type.

    Can express preconditions when used as
    function arguments or postconditions when
    used as return types.

    Example:
    - a natural number

    Haskell libraries
    - LiquidHaskell

SMT [problem]
Satisfiability modulo theories [problem]
    A form of the constraint satisfaction
    problem.

    A certain formalized approach to
    constraint programming.

    A decision problem for logical formulas
    with respect to combinations of background
    theories expressed in classical
    first-order logic with equality.

    http://goto.ucsd.edu:8090/index.html#?demo=refinements101.hs

LiquidHaskell
    Refinement Types via:
    - SMT, and
    - Predicate Abstraction

Promise API
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3884281/what-does-the-function-then-mean-in-javascript

    Designed to solve the callback nesting
    problem and the error handling that comes
    with it.

    functions
    - .then()

tacit [knowledge]
    understood or implied without being stated.

golden ratio
    The most irrational number, because it has
    the simplest continued fraction.

    Has 2 forms:
    - φ = 1 + 1 / φ
    - 1/φ = 0 + 1 / φ

    Continued fraction:
    - φ = 1 + 1 / (1 + 1 / φ')

    The reason it's found everywhere in nature
    (and fibonacci numbers, by extension) must
    be because:
    - the simplicity of its formula
    - it embodies the limit of irrationality
      you can achieve with only one variable.

Language Oriented Programming
LOP

Nothing
    [Nothing :: Maybe a]

    It's the type-safe equivalent of a void
    pointer (i.e. void *).

Colon
    [English]

    (instead of a semicolon)

    May be used between independent clauses
    when the second sentence explains,
    illustrates, paraphrases, or expands on
    the first sentence.

    Example:
        He got what he worked for: he really
        earned that promotion.

Semicolon
    [English]

    Example:
        I have a big test tomorrow; I can't go
        out tonight.

    The two clauses in that sentence are
    separated by a semicolon and could be
    sentences on their own if you put a period
    between them instead.

Macros
    [Racket]

    Some Racketeers quibble with this term,
    preferring syntax transformers, because a
    Racket macro can be more sophisticated
    than the usual Common Lisp macro.

Monadic Parser Combinator
    A popular approach to building recursive
    descent parsers in FP.
    - model parsers as functions, and
    - define higher-order functions (or
      combinators) that implement grammar
      constructions such as sequencing,
      choice, and repetition.

    Such parsers form an
    instance of a monad.

    http://www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~pszgmh/monparsing.pdf
    $HOME/notes2018/ws/parser-combinators/monparsing.txt

Normed Division Algebras:
    There are exactly four:
    - real numbers (R),
    - complex numbers (C),
    - quaternions (), and
    - octonions (O).

Software Transactional Memory
STM
    A concurrency control mechanism analogous
    to database transactions for controlling
    access to shared memory in concurrent
    computing.

merkle trees
    A type of data structure.

    Used by
    - Git
    - blockchain

git
    Not an example of blockchain technology.

    Bult is similar, as are Merkel trees.

    In a blockchain implementation, every
    block is verified independently multiple
    times before it is added to the
    blockchain.

Personal Specific Language
PSR

Semantic Analysis
    The process of relating syntactic
    structures, from the levels of phrases,
    clauses, sentences and paragraphs to the
    level of the writing as a whole, to their
    language-independent meanings.

    According to Chen, parsing is the easy
    part and the semantic analysis is the hard
    part.

TOML
Tom's Obvious, Minimal Language
    [configuration file format]

    Easy to read.

    Designed to map unambiguously to a
    dictionary.

    Appears to be used often by cargo.

    toiq $HOME/.cargo/registry/src/github.com-1ecc6299db9ec823/rand-0.4.2/Cargo.toml
    toiq $HOME/.cargo/registry/src/github.com-1ecc6299db9ec823/google-somethin-0.1.4/Cargo.toml

functor
function object
    A construct allowing an object to be
    invoked or called as if it were an
    ordinary function, usually with the same
    syntax (a function parameter that can also
    be a function).

functor
    [category theory]
    A structure-preserving transformation
    between categories.

    It's some way to map objects from one
    category to objects of another category
    while also preserving the arrows between
    objectsthink of it as a category
    homomorphism.

    In a broad sense, a functor is the moral
    equivalent of a function between
    categories.

endofunctor
    A functor from one category back to the
    same category.

    It maps objects of the category to objects
    of the same category.

    The simplest example is the identity
    functor which maps every object inside a
    category back to itself; more interesting
    examples map objects to other objects in
    the same category.

Hot swap
    The replacement of a hard drive, CD-ROM
    drive, power supply, or other device with
    a similar device while the computer system
    using it remains in operation.

    The replacement can be because of a device
    failure or, for storage devices, to
    substitute other data.

Binding
    A binding is a correspondence between a
    name and its value.

Dynamic Binding
    All variable names and their values live
    in one global table.

    In contrast to "Lexical Binding".

Dynamic Binding vs Static Binding
    Two regimes for handling variable binding.

    The difference is more subtle
    than their names imply.

    Lexical and dynamic binding refer to how
    variables are looked up by their names.

Binding Scope
    Examples:
    - function
    - let syntax

Lexical Binding
Static Binding
    Each binding scope creates a new table of
    variable names and values, organised in a
    hierarchy called "the environment".

    In contrast to "Dynamic Binding".

coherence time
    [For an electromagnetic wave]

    The time over which a propagating wave
    (especially a laser or maser beam) may be
    considered coherent.

    The time interval within which its phase
    is, on average, predictable.

Differentiable Inductive Logic Programming
    https://towardsdatascience.com/deepmind-combines-logic-and-neural-networks-to-extract-rules-from-noisy-data-2fbd0f6edfb7?fbclid=IwAR2YkK37w8UisGIkeW6i3zHQ69WqWoB3_n2Cbv6NtEteiJru-cAcqw3iZYI

    $HOME/notes2018/ws/inductive-logic-programming-ilp/1711.04574-edit.txt

Segmentation Fault
segfault
Access violation
    A fault, or failure condition, raised by
    hardware with memory protection, notifying
    an operating system (OS) the software has
    attempted to access a restricted area of
    memory (a memory access violation).

LFI
Low-Frequency Inhibition
    https://www.researchgate.net/figure/A-C-The-difference-in-arrival-time-of-low-frequency-inhibition-LFI-t1-red-and_fig5_237813895

    Nothing to do with problog, I think. 'inhibition' is a coincidence.

HFI
High-Frequency Inhibition
    https://www.researchgate.net/figure/A-C-The-difference-in-arrival-time-of-low-frequency-inhibition-LFI-t1-red-and_fig5_237813895

    Nothing to do with problog.

LFI
Learning from interpretations
    [problog function]

    man problog | grep lfi
    lfi: learn parameters from data (see lfi --help)

    problog lfi --help | grep Learning
    Learning from interpretations with ProbLog

    Given a set of words that appear in
    documents, we can train a Noisy-OR rule to
    determine how strongly a word indicates
    that the document has a certain topic.

Applicative vs Normal Order
    [#lambda calculus]

ANN
    size  expressivity  variance  overfitting

[a] non-deterministic computation
    A computation that:

    Instead of producing a single result, it
    might produce many.

    not a pure function.

List Monad
    Turns a non-deterministic computation
    (which is not a pure function) into a pure
    function one by transforming its result
    type from a to a list of a.

    In essence, we create a function that
    returns all possible results at once.

rank 1 polymorphism
    While you can write a function that takes
    different types of arguments without this
    extension, you can't write a function that
    uses its argument as different types in
    the same invocation.

rank 2 polymorphism
    Provided in haskell with the Rank2Types
    extension.

parametric polymorphism
    The type truly does not matter (fringe,
    for example, really doesn't care what kind
    of elements are found in the leaves of a
    tree). In Haskell, type classes provide a
    structured way to control ad hoc
    polymorphism, or overloading.

    This is different from ad-hoc
    polymorphism.

ad-hoc polymorphism
overloading
    https://www.haskell.org/tutorial/classes.html

    Examples:
    - The literals 1, 2, etc. are often used
      to represent both fixed and arbitrary
      precision integers.
    - Numeric operators such as + are often
      defined to work on many different kinds
      of numbers.
    - The equality operator (== in Haskell)
      usually works on numbers and many other
      (but not all) types.

    Note that these overloaded behaviors are
    different for each type (in fact the
    behavior is sometimes undefined, or
    error).

    This is different from parametric
    polymorphism.

sideload
sideloading
    Similar to "upload" and "download".

    The process of transferring files between
    two local devices, in particular between a
    computer and a mobile device such as a
    mobile phone, smartphone, PDA, tablet,
    portable media player or e-reader.

e^x
    For any x,
      the value of e^x at x ==
        gradient at x ==
          area (between curve and y=0)

    value (of y) == gradient == area

    When writing math to do with calculus, if
    you write in terms of e then the math
    becomes simpler.

Nonlinearity
    A common issue when examining cause-effect
    relations.

    Such instances require complex modeling
    and hypothesis to offer explanations to
    nonlinear events.

    Nonlinearity without explanation can lead
    to random, unforecasted outcomes such as
    chaos.

superposition principle
superposition property
    For all linear systems, the net response
    caused by two or more stimuli is the sum
    of the responses that would have been
    caused by each stimulus individually.

    Simple explanation:
    If input A produces response X, and
    input B produces response Y, then
    input (A + B) produces response (X + Y).

semver
Semantic Version
    https://semver.org/

    Given a version number MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH,
    increment the:
    - MAJOR version when you make incompatible API changes,
    - MINOR version when you add functionality in a backwards-compatible manner, and
    - PATCH version when you make backwards-compatible bug fixes.

    Additional labels for pre-release and
    build metadata are available as extensions
    to the MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH format.

Homotopy Type Theory
    A new field of study relating Martin-Löfs
    system of intensional, constructive type
    theory with abstract homotopy theory.

    Propositional equality is interpreted as
    homotopy and type isomorphism as homotopy
    equivalence.

    Logical constructions in type theory then
    correspond to homotopy-invariant
    constructions on spaces, while theorems
    and even proofs in the logical system
    inherit a homotopical meaning.

    As the natural logic of homotopy,
    constructive type theory is also related
    to higher category theory as it is used
    e.g. in the notion of a higher topos.

Mebibyte
MiB
    2^20 bytes

Mebibit
Mibit
    2^20 bit
hippocampus
    A small organ located within the brain's
    medial temporal lobe and forms an
    important part of the limbic system, the
    region that regulates emotions. The
    hippocampus is associated mainly with
    memory, in particular long-term memory.
    The organ also plays an important role in
    spatial navigation.

    Facts:
    - lifelong neuron formation in the human
      brain's hippocampus

Kia kaha
    We stand together.
    Stay strong.

    A Māori phrase used by the people of New
    Zealand as an affirmation, meaning stay
    strong.

    The phrase has significant meaning for
    Māori:
        popularised through its usage by the
        28th Māori Battalion during World War
        II, it is found in titles of books and
        songs, as well as a motto.

surprise
    The log of the inverse of the probability.

Internationalization
i18n

Localization
l10n

Globalization
g11n

Localizability
l12y

Hoogle
    I should make them for everything,
    literally.

    I need to streamline this process to the
    max.

    fuzzy search for an rtcmd. all an rtcmd is
    is a program that is guaranteed to take
    stdin and output stderr.

    How guaranteed?

    I have to be able to search. To search I
    need types.

    Need to be able to search for functions
    with types.

    That's what Hoogle is for.

    type declarative search

type declarative search
    What Hoogle performs to find functions
    based on their types.

GPIO
General Purpose Input Output

percent homology
sequence similarity

orthologous
    Homologous sequences are orthologous if
    they are inferred to be descended from the
    same ancestral sequence separated by a
    speciation event:
        when a species diverges into two
        separate species, the copies of a
        single gene in the two resulting
        species are said to be orthologous.

Algebraic structures
    Provide the operational under-pinnings for
    algebraic data types.

    What's missing is the static typing
    constraints.

Critical Point
    A wide term used in a lot of branches of
    mathematics, but is always connected to
    the derivative of a function or mapping.

Hackage
    The Haskell community's central package
    archive of open source software.

alpha-beta pruning
    [search algorithm]

    Used by chess bots.

    But MCTS does a better job perhaps.
    https://en.chessbase.com/post/monte-carlo-instead-of-alpha-beta

information vs probability
    Probability is based on counting
    occurrences in n trials as n approaches .

    Information is based on average
    occurrences of patterns in n trials for
    very large n.

car
    [operation]

    Returns the first element of the list

cdr
    [operation]

    Returns the rest of the list.

SSA
    [basically] a variable graph.
    A CodeLingo thing.

    We need to change the name because ssa is
    really not catching on haha.

    Its like, traversing from a variable
    definition to/from a reference. But also,
    I dont think you need to be in this
    conversation haha - your local platform is
    actually higher priority!

periodic sequence
cycle
    A sequence for which the same terms are
    repeated over and over: a1, a2, ..., ap,
    a1, a2, ..., ap, a1, a2, ..., ap, ...

period
p
    The number of repeated terms in a periodic
    sequence.

particle horizon
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJevBNQsKtU

Surprisal
Self-Information
    Information or surprisal for an outcome.

event horizon [of the universe]
    The limit of the visible future.

partical horizon [of the universe]
    The limit of the visible past.

geodesic
    A curve representing in some sense the
    shortest path between two points in a
    surface.

    When I was thinking about what the most
    fundamental part of a circle is, I was
    thinking about geodesics.

conjecture
    A conclusion or proposition based on
    incomplete information, for which no proof
    has been found.

    Examples
    - Riemann hypothesis
    - Fermat's Last Theorem

Maybe Type
Maybe Monad
    http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.12.0.0/docs/Data-Maybe.html

    The Maybe type is also a monad.

    It is a simple kind of error monad, where
    all errors are represented by Nothing.

    A richer error monad can be built using
    the Either type.

go
weiqi
围棋
    [game]

    Pronounced 'wei-chi'.

aphantasia
    Inability visualise mental images at all.

complete graph
    A simple undirected graph in which every
    pair of distinct vertices is connected by
    a unique edge.

    A complete digraph is a directed graph in
    which every pair of distinct vertices is
    connected by a pair of unique edges (one
    in each direction).

disjoint union [of two sets]
    A binary operator that combines all
    distinct elements of a pair of given sets,
    while retaining the original set
    membership as a distinguishing
    characteristic of the union set.

clustering coefficient
    A measure of the degree to which nodes in
    a graph tend to cluster together.

git worktree
    A git repository can support multiple
    working trees, allowing you to check out
    more than one branch at a time.

free Monad
    A monad that does not perform any work
    during the normalization step beyond
    simply grafting the two monadic values
    together.

Skolemization

satisfiability and validity
    satisfiability and validity are elementary
    concepts of semantics.

validity
    [of a function]

    A formula is valid if all interpretations
    make the formula true.

satisfiable
    [of a function]

    It is possible to find an interpretation
    that makes the formula true.

existential quantifier
...
    A logical constant which is interpreted as
    "there exists", "there is at least one",
    or "for some".

    \exists {n}{\in }\mathbb {N} \,P(n,n,25)

Skolem normal form
SNF
    Reduction to SNF is a method for removing
    existential quantifiers from formal logic
    statements.

    The first step in an automated theorem
    prover.

    A formula of first-order logic is in
    Skolem normal form if it is in prenex
    normal form with only universal
    first-order quantifiers.

first-order language
    Its interpretation assigns a denotation to
    each non-logical symbol in that language,
    and determines a domain of discourse, D,
    that specifies the range of the
    quantifiers.

domain of discourse
D
    A nonempty set of "objects" of some kind.

first-order formula
    A statement about the objects in a domain
    of discourse.

    Example:
        xP(x)
        The existence of an object x such that
        the predicate P is true where referred
        to it.

Skolemization
    Every first-order formula may be converted
    into SNF while not changing its
    satisfiability via a process called
    Skolemization. The resulting formula is
    not necessarily equivalent to the original
    one, but is equisatisfiable with it.

equisatisfiable
    Satisfiable if and only if the original
    one is satisfiable.

forms
    - former
      earlier form
    - latter
      later form
    - first form
    - second form
    - last form

Sequence Similarity Search
Homology Search
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820096/

    Can identify homologous proteins or
    genes by detecting excess similarity 
    statistically significant similarity that
    reflects common ancestry.

    This unit provides an overview of the
    inference of homology from significant
    similarity, and introduces other units in
    this chapter that provide more details on
    effective strategies for identifying
    homologs.

    * homology search
    - homolog search (sequences that share a common evolutionary ancestor)
    - inference of functional similarity from homology

    The relationship between homology
    (structure) and function is complex.

    Homology is inferred from significant
    similarity.

    Then you need to connect homology to more
    accurate functional prediction.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820096/

    vimlinks +/"While similarity searching" "https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820096/"

homology
    [theory]

    A general way of associating a sequence of
    algebraic objects such as abelian groups
    or modules to other mathematical objects
    such as topological spaces.

cohomology
    [noun]
    A sequence of abelian groups associated to
    a topological space, often defined from a
    cochain complex.

    [verb]
    A method of assigning richer algebraic
    invariants to a space than homology.

abelian group
commutative group
    [a type of group]

    A groups that obeys the axiom of
    commutativity.

    Applying the group operation to two group
    elements results in the same thing no
    matter the order in which they are
    written.

cochain complex
    Similar to a chain complex, except that
    its homomorphisms follow a different
    convention.

    The homology of a cochain complex is
    called its cohomology.

realism
    The universe exists independent of the
    mind of the observer.

    Quantum Mechanics still has scientists
    wondering if we should reject this premise.

special relativity
    Link between space and time.

general relativity
    Extends special relativity to include
    gravity and its effects on spacetime.

Category theory
    The algebraic theory of the "types" and
    "functions" you find in any typed formal
    languauge.

    Officially, category theory calls the
    types "objects" and functions "morphisms"
    so as to avoid treading on the
    set-theoretic toes of the traditionalists,
    but increasingly I see category theorists
    throwing such caution to the wind and
    using the more intuitive terms:
    - "type" and
    - "function"

bisociation
bisociative
    The simultaneous mental association of an
    idea or object with two fields ordinarily
    not regarded as related the pun is perhaps
    the simplest form of bisociation.

recommender systems
    Both association rules and collaborative
    filtering can be used for building
    recommender systems but answer
    fundamentally different questions.

collaborative filtering
    [algorithm]

    Answers the question:
    - What items do users with interests
      similar to yours like?

    Used in recommender system.

association rules
    [algorithm]

    Answers the question:
    - What items do frequently appear
      together?

    Used in recommender system.

    Algorithms:
    - a-priori

text simplification
    Not the same as summarization.

    Consists of:
    - syntactic simplification
      addressing sentence structure
    - lexical simplification
      addressing words and short phrases
    - explanation generation
      addressing word meanings

visceral
    relating to deep inward feelings rather
    than to the intellect.

    Example:
    "the voters' visceral fear of change"

portmanteau
    Hackett is a portmanteau of haskell and
    racket.

    Jsonnet is a portmanteau of JSON and
    sonnet.

Theory of patches
    The math behind exchanging patches.

    https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Understanding_Darcs/Patch_theory

hyperparameter
    A parameter whose value is used to control
    the learning process.

    By contrast, the values of other
    parameters (typically node weights) are
    derived via training.

learning the parameters of a model
parameter learning
    Given a set of data cases or observations
    and a model structure, one can infer the
    distribution over the model parameters,
    found for instance in the conditional
    probability table1 in the clique
    potentials, in the mapping, or the
    transition probabilities.

    Does not differ from inference in Bayesian
    probability theory, so the reasons for
    studying them separately are mostly
    practical.

    For instance in the EM algorithm, the
    updates of parameters and latent variables
    are done separately and in different ways.

gradual typing
    [Typed Racket]

    Lets you add types after you've been
    working in untyped mode.

Apriori Algorithm
    [Association Rule Mining]

    https://blog.usejournal.com/association-rule-mining-apriori-algorithm-c517f8d7c54c

Support
    [Association Rule Mining]

    An indication of how frequently the items
    appear in the data.

    n_(X,Y) = number of transactions containing both X and Y
    n       = Total number of transations

                          n_(X,Y)
    Support({X} -> {Y}) = -------
                             n

    n_X     = number of transactions X appears in

              n_X
    supp(X) = ---
               n

    Example:
    support of onions
    support(onion) = 4/6


Confidence
    [Association Rule Mining]

    Indicates the number of times the if-then
    statements are found true.

    n_(X,Y) = number of transactions containing both X and Y
    n_X     = number number of transations containing X

                             n_(X,Y)
    Confidence({X} -> {Y}) = -------
                               n_X

    You can also work out the confidence from
    the support.

                 supp(XUY)
    conf(X->Y) = ---------
                  supp(X)

Lift
    [Association Rule Mining]

    Can be used to compare confidence with expected confidence.

    n_(X,Y) = number of transactions containing both X and Y
    n_X     = number of transations containing X
    _(Y)   = Fraction of transactions containing Y

                       n_(X,Y) / n_X
    Lift({X} -> {Y}) = -------------
                           _(Y)

backtrace
stack backtrace
stacktrace
    A summary of how your program got where it
    is.

BSON
    The binary encoding of JSON-like documents
    that MongoDB uses when storing documents
    in collections.

black hole gravity assist
    If you try to approach a black hole
    through elliptical orbit where the "near
    pass" speed would exceed speed of light if
    counted in Newton and Kepler way,
    obviously that won't work.

    Instead of speed that would counteract the
    centripetal force of gravity of the black
    hole, you'll start gaining mass, and that
    will make the black hole's gravitational
    pull on you so much stronger.

    "Falling", instead of speeding up you keep
    gaining weight, and so the gravity pull
    grows not only with waning distance but
    with your kinetic energy growing - until
    the inevitable demise.

engram
    A hypothetical permanent change in the
    brain accounting for the existence of
    memory; a memory trace.

    Theorized to be means by which memories
    are stored as biophysical or biochemical
    changes in the brain in response to
    external stimuli. The existence of engrams
    is posited by some scientific theories to
    explain the persistence of memory and how
    memories are stored in the brain.

lisp-case
spinal-case
kebab-case

Train-Case

regex variants
    oniguruma
        Generally fast, but has the
        possibility of running slowly if
        you're "unlucky" with a particular
        regexp. that's because it's a
        backtracking algorithm.

    re2
        generally a little slower that
        oniguruma, but it doesn't have the
        same risk - its time will never[*]
        explode in the same way (it doesn't
        have worst case exponential
        behaviour).

PCRE2
    https://www.pcre.org/current/doc/html/pcre2.html

shannon entropy vs liklihood
    The better model is the one that is more
    likely to produce the data i.e. has
    maximum liklihood.

    The better model is the one that has
    Maximum Entropy for what it does not
    explain.

thermodynamic entropy
entropy
    [physics]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vX_WLrcgikc

    Entropy is not disorder.

    Microstates

    Macrostates

Total internal reflection
    Total internal reflection is the
    phenomenon that makes the water-to-air
    surface in a fish-tank look like a
    perfectly silvered mirror when viewed from
    below the water level.

Fine Structure Constant
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsJhdHVfgx8

    A hyper parameter for the universe.

    Determines the amount of energy required
    for an elecron to change energy level,
    among other things.

complement
    [#set theory]

    The complement of a set A refers to
    elements not in A.

red herring
    A clue or piece of information which is or
    is intended to be misleading or
    distracting.

    Something that misleads or distracts from
    a relevant or important question. It may
    be either a logical fallacy or a literary
    device that leads readers or audiences
    toward a false conclusion.

Thelemic mysticism
    A complex mystical path designed to do two
    interrelated things:
        to learn one's unique True Will and to
        achieve union with the All.

    PHP is Thelemaic

SCM
Source Control Management
VCS
Version Control System

quasiquote
backtick notation
    redundant in modern scheme.
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/15849995/given-the-powerful-macro-system-are-quote-and-quasiquote-redundant-in-moder

    racket
    emacs-lisp
    common-lisp

        `(1 ,@(list 1 2) 4)

    racket
        (quasiquote (0 (unquote-splicing (list 1 2)) 4))

Liesel
    That's her name! Don't forget it!

Étendue
    A property of light in an optical system,
    which characterizes how "spread out" the
    light is in area and angle.

Conservation of Étendue
    https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/124957/would-turning-the-planet-mercury-into-a-giant-mirror-be-a-good-way-to-heat-the-o

    You cannot gather light from a wide cone,
    and then send it out into a thin beam.

    This means that whatever light you reflect
    off of Mercury, when it reaches Neptune
    that light covers an area that is 75 time
    larger than the Sun, in effect 75 times
    weaker per unit of surface area than what
    hits Mercury.

Verifiable Delay Function
VDF
    [puzzle]

    The solution can only be found after a
    certain number of steps.

    Because VDFs can also be used to create
    unbiased randomness, theyve been proposed
    as potential approaches to improve the
    security and scalability of blockchain
    systems like Ethereum and Filecoin.

regex
regular algebra
    Comes from Neuroscience.

    It was considered at the time that this
    was the closest thing to mimicking the
    human brain.

    It could find things, like finding a
    needle in a haystack.

regular set
    The symbols used in a regular expression.

Fail-safe
    A device will not endanger lives or
    property when it fails.

Fail-secure
Fail-closed
    Access or data will not fall into the
    wrong hands in a security failure.

Serverless
    [architecture]

    Uses either:
    - Backend as a Service (BaaS)
    - Functions as a Service (FaaS)

(?{...})
    - perlre code in matcher
    - custom predicates

    Inside a (?{...}) block
    - $_
      The string the regular expression is
      matching against.
    - pos()
      The current position of matching within
      this string.

(??{ code })
    Return value is treated as a pattern
    rather than assigned to $^R.

Taint checking
    [feature of some programming languages]

    Increase security by preventing malicious
    users from executing commands on a host
    computer.

    Checks any of (but not limited to):
    - SQL injection
    - buffer overflow attack
    - perlre embedded user code

$_
topic
default variable
    [perl syntax]

three main combinatoric primitives
    - k-tuples (rarely called variations),
    - permutations, and
    - cobminations

Church encoding
    A means of representing data and operators
    in the lambda calculus

Prions
    Misfolded versions of a protein.

    Can pread like an infection by forcing
    normal copies of that protein into the
    same self-propagating, misfolded shape.

    PrP
        The original prion

backtracking
    For a regular expression to match, the
    entire regular expression must match, not
    just part of it.

    So if the beginning of a pattern
    containing a quantifier succeeds in a way
    that causes later parts in the pattern to
    fail, the matching engine backs up and
    recalculates the beginning part--that's
    why it's called backtracking.

P versus NP problem
    A major unsolved problem in computer
    science.

    Does every problem whose solution can be
    verified in polynomial time can also be
    solved in polynomial time?

    solution-verifiable in O(n^k) => solvable in O(n^k)?

    Does solution-verifiable in polynomial
    time imply that it is solvable in
    polynomial time also?

    Continuously compounding 100% interest.

    100% interest calculated once is 2x.
    100% compound interest with 2 intervals is 2.25x.
    100% compound interest with 3 intervals is 2.37x.
    100% compound interest with  intervals is .

Cross-validation
    [technique]

    Evaluate:
    - estimator performance
    - predictive models

    Partitioning the original sample into:
    - a training set to train the model, and
    - a test set to evaluate it.

Weyl Invariance
    [invariance]

    Invariance under local changes in scale.

Sequence Chunker
Phrase chunking
    [basic NLP task]

    Tag word-ngrams syntactically.

        The quick brown fox jumped over the fence
        |                   |      |    |
        Noun                Verb   Prep Noun

    The quick brown fox is a single token/gram.

Noun-Phrase
NP
    [phrase]

    Has a noun (or pronoun) as its head and
    zero or more dependent modifiers.

    The most frequently occurring phrase type
    and its inner segmentation is critical for
    understanding the semantics of the
    Noun-Phrase.

Semantic Segmentation
    [algorithm]

    MLP classifier.

    Build a semantic hierarchy that represents
    the semantic meaning.

    Eventually creates a tree
        Eeach tier represent a semantic meaning
            If a sequence of words is a
            collocation then a collocation
            tier is created, else the elements
            are broken down and each one is
            mapped to different tier in the
            tree.
I2C
    [interface]
    [bus]

    A colourful cable; black, red, white yellow.

    Each I2C bus consists of two signals:
    - SCL (the clock signal) , and
    - SDA (the data signal).

black cable
    ground

red cable
    current

laplacian
Laplace operator

sign function
signum function
    An odd mathematical function that extracts
    the sign of a real number.

    In mathematical expressions the sign
    function is often represented as sgn.

    1 if positive
    -1 if negative

Connectionist Temporal Classification
    CTC
    [loss function]

    egr list of loss functions

divergence
    [of different vector fields]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAXyLhvZ-Vg

    The divergence of vectors from point (x,y) equals
    the sum of the partial derivative-with-respect-to-x of the x-component and the partial
    derivative-with-respect-to-y of the y-component at that point

    (let-point ((p (x,y)))
        (== (divergence-of-vectors-from-point p)
            (sum-of the-partial-derivative-with-respect-to-x-of-the-x-component
                    the-partial-derivative-with-respect-to-y-of-the-y-component :at-point p)))

recursive-descent
    recursive-descent parser
    recursive-descent parser generator

Partial Derivative

    As opposed to 'd' for derivative.

Mean absolute error
    The average of sum of absolute differences
    between predictions and actual
    observations.

    Like MSE, this as well measures the
    magnitude of error without considering
    their direction.

    Unlike MSE, MAE needs more complicated
    tools such as linear programming to
    compute the gradients.

    Plus MAE is more robust to outliers since
    it does not make use of square.

permute
    This means 'rearrange', not 'enumerate
    rearrangements'.

Electrophysiology
    The branch of physiology that pertains
    broadly to the flow of ions (ion current)
    in biological tissues and, in particular,
    to the electrical recording techniques
    that enable the measurement of this flow.

lexically scoped
    Something in the textual environment of
    the expression determines the identifiers
    binding.

model pruning
    Makes a model fast and small.

    Among the many parameters in the network,
    some are redundant and dont contribute a
    lot to the output.

    Important for running deep learning
    networks on smaller devices.

Tensor rank decomposition
    Generalization of the matrix singular
    value decomposition (SVD) to tensors.

model optimisation
    https://www.tensorflow.org/lite/performance/model_optimization

    - pruning and structured pruning.
      Reduce parameter count
    - quantization
      Reduce representational precision
    - Update the original model topology to a
      more efficient one with reduced
      parameters or faster execution.

      For example:
      - tensor decomposition methods
      - distillation

model weights pruning
    Force some of the weights of the model to
    zero while training.

    Results in a sparse model.

    [To prune, or not to prune: exploring the
    efficacy of pruning for model
    compression](https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.01878)

Weight Quantization
    Post Training

    A general technique to reduce model size
    while also providing up to 3x lower
    latency with little degradation in model
    accuracy.

    Post-training quantization quantizes
    weights from floating point to 8-bits of
    precision.

bloom filter
    [space-efficient probabilistic data structure]

    Test whether an element is a member of a
    set.

    space-efficient.

GNU arch
    Superceded by GNU Bazaar.

correctness [of an algorithm]
    asserted when it is said that the
    algorithm is correct with respect to a
    specification.

Functional correctness
    for each input it produces the expected output.

partial correctness vs total correctness
    They both mean if an answer is returned it will be correct.

    Total means the algorithm also terminates.

     No general solution to the halting
    problem, a total correctness assertion may
    lie much deeper.

termination proof
    A type of mathematical proof that plays a
    critical role in formal verification
    because total correctness of an algorithm
    depends on termination.

manifold
    (or
      (or
        pipe
        pipage
        piping)
      paper
      (or
      mathematical space
      topological space))

full-text extraction
    - Extracting entities
      Such as companies, people, dollar
      amounts, key initiatives, etc.

    - Categorizing content
      Positive or negative (e.g. sentiment
      analysis), by function, intention or
      purpose, or by industry or other
      categories for analytics and trending.

    - Clustering content
      To identify main topics of discourse
      and/or to discover new topics.

    - Fact extraction
      To fill databases with structured
      information for analysis, visualization,
      trending, or alerts.

    - Relationship extraction
      To fill out graph databases to explore
      real-world relationships.

Anaphoric
    An expression who's interpretation depends
    on its antecedent or postcedent.

    Anaphoric form of ‘-map’.

kubernetes
k8s
    An open-source container orchestration
    system for automating application
    deployment, scaling, and management. It
    was originally designed by Google, and is
    now maintained by the Cloud Native
    Computing Foundation.

partial function [haskell]
    A function that is not defined for all
    possible arguments of the specified type.

    Examples:
    - head, tail
      Undefined for empty lists.

    - (!!)
      Undefined if the index is at least as
      big as the list length.

    - div
      Undefined if the divisor is zero.

    The opposite is a total function.

    Avoid partial functions and instead write
    total ones.
        Makes "if your code compiles, it
        probably works" true for your code
        more often.

    Usually if you have a partial function,
    it's because your types are incorrect and
    you should fix your types rather than
    writing partial functions which guarantee
    the impossible.

    A good example of this is head.

    You shouldn't use this function or write
    functions like it.

    The problem is in the type, it says [a] ->
    a which is actually impossible as far as
    total functions are concerned.

    Why?

    Because you might have an empty list!

    Instead, a more honest type that lets you
    write a total function would be [a] ->
    Maybe a.

    This makes the possibility of not getting
    a result more explicit and keeps your
    functions total.

    You almost never have an excuse for
    writing a partial function!

    There are methods to avoid the use of
    partial functions.

    Example:
        head :: [h] -> h                      -- 'head' is a function. list -> element.
                                              -- what is the relevance of 'a'? It could be anything?
        head []    = error "head: empty list" -- [], therefore error
        head (x:_) = x

        -- The empty list case errors.
        -- If the list is empty, it panics.

total function [haskell]
    Opposite of a partial function.

continuation
    An abstract representation of the control
    state of a computer program.

    A data structure that represents the
    computational process at a given point in
    the process's execution

control flow
    The order in which individual statements,
    instructions or function calls of an
    imperative program are executed or
    evaluated.

    Explicit control flow distinguishes an
    imperative programming language from a
    declarative programming language.

control state

Reification
    The process by which an abstract idea
    about a computer program is turned into an
    explicit data model or other object
    created in a programming language.

    verb: reifies

Genetic Search
    - Generate initial population of states,
    - prune those states under a threshold
      that have the lowest values using a
      fitness function.
    - Randomly combine the survivors,
    - mutate a couple of bits
    - evaluate fitness
    - repeat

preposition
    Literally, "pre-position" -- it's a word
    that expects another word to follow.

    A word such as after, in, to, on, and
    with.

    Prepositions are usually used in front of
    nouns or pronouns and they show the
    relationship between the noun or pronoun
    and other words in a sentence

adverb
    Like a decorator for a phrase.

    An adverb is a word that modifies a verb,
    adjective, determiner, clause,
    preposition, or sentence.

    Typically express manner, place, time,
    frequency, degree, level of certainty,
    etc., answering questions such as how?, in
    what way?, when?, where?, and to what
    extent?

uninformed search
    Used when there is no information about
    the cost of navigating between states.

    Examples:
    - DFS
    - IDFS
    - BFS

informed search
    Used when we know the cost or have a solid
    estimate of the cost between states.

    Examples:
    - UCF
    - A*
    - IDA*

Best-first search
    [graph search algorithm]

    - Orders all partial solutions (states)
      according to some heuristic, then
    - expands the most promising node chosen
      according to a specified rule.

    Examples
    - A*

early stopping
    Stopping the training once your loss
    starts to increase (or in other words
    validation accuracy starts to decrease).

GRU
Gated Recurrent Unit

RNN with GRU
Gated Recurrent Neural Networks

Tensor2Tensor
T2T

beam search
    [heuristic search algorithm]
    [best-first search algorithm]

    egr andrew ng beam

    - greedy

    Only a predetermined number of best
    partial solutions are kept as candidates.

End Of Sentence
E.O.S.

Google Dialogflow
    - intents,
    - entities, and
    - context

complimentary properties
    Measure one perfectly and you lose all
    information about the other.

boba
tapioca pearls
    https://www.mydomaine.com/what-is-boba

Oxidiser
    Any chemicals that cause the ignition of
    combustible materials without an external
    source of ignition.

multidimensional integrals
    Typically intractable analytically.

Bayesian analysis
    Involves multidimensional integrals.

Multi-agent system
MAS
Self-organized system
    Agents and their environment.

    Artificial Intelligence -- A Modern Approach.

    Agents
    - Passive agents or "agent without goals"
      Obstacle, apple or key in any simple simulation.

    - Active agents with simple goals
      Like birds in flocking, or wolfsheep in
      prey-predator model.

    - Cognitive agents
      Complex calculations.

    Types:
    - methodic
    - functional
    - procedural approaches
    - algorithmic search
    - reinforcement learning

Grand Unified Theory
    [model in particle physics]

    At high energy, the three gauge
    interactions of the Standard Model that
    define the electromagnetic, weak, and
    strong interactions, or forces, are merged
    into a single force.

Grand Unified Representation

FSM
Finite State Machine
    regex

Principal Component Analysis
PCA
SVD
    [ML algorithm]

    Basic.

    Reduce the dimensionality of the data,
    losing the least amount of information.

InPCA
Intensive PCA
    ewwlinks +/"We introduce Intensive Principal Component Analysis" "https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/06/21/1817218116"

Natural Vector

Overdetermined system of equations
    The number of equations exceeds the number
    of unknowns.

Curve fitting
    The process of constructing a curve, or
    mathematical function, that has the best
    fit to a series of data points, possibly
    subject to constraints.

    - The sum of sines model
      Fits periodic functions.
    - Least squares

Least Squares
    Minimizing the sum of squares of
    deviations of some functions from the
    desired variables.

    Purpose
    - curve fitting
    - solving overdetermined systems of
      equations:
      Find solutions in the case of ordinary
      (not overdetermined) nonlinear systems
      of equations, as well as to approximate
      the point values of a certain function.

Polynomial regression
    [1. form of regression analysis]
    [2. model]

    The relationship between the independent
    variable x and the dependent variable y is
    modelled as an nth degree polynomial in x.

    Fits a nonlinear relationship between the
    value of x and the corresponding
    conditional mean of y, denoted E(y |x),
    and has been used to describe nonlinear
    phenomena such as the growth rate of
    tissues, the distribution of carbon
    isotopes in lake sediments, and the
    progression of disease epidemics.

Sum of Sines Models
    Includes the phase constant.


linear/logistic regression
    [Linear model]

Optimisation methods
    - L-BFGS
    - SGD
    - Adam

SVM
    [Linear model]

    Has a margin-based loss function.

    Can optimize the loss function using
    optimization methods.

    One unique thing that SVMs can do is to
    study classifier classifiers.

    Used for:
    - training classifiers
      (even regressors).

non-linearities
    - sigmoid,
    - tanh,
    - relu + softmax
    - selu (cool new)

Autoencoder
    Learns without a teacher.

Multilayer perceptron
Feed-Forward Neural Network
FFNN
    Basically, these are multi-level logistic
    regression classifiers.

    Many layers of scales are separated by
    non-linearities.

    Can be used for as autoencoders.

    Can be used to train a classifier or
    extract functions as autoencoders.

RNN aggregator

TF-IDF
    Doesnt preserve the context of each word
    in the sentences.

BOW
    Treats each word separately and encoding
    each of the words.

    We can use TF-IDF with BOW.

Sentence classification
    2 ways
    - Bag of words model (BOW)
    - Deep neural network models
      For beter results.

    E.g. tasks:
    - Named Entity Extraction
    - Sentiment analysis

Named-entity
    Examples:
    - person's name
    - name of an organisation
    - name of a location
    - medical code
    - time expression
    - quantity
    - percentage

Natural language generation
NLG

syntactic constituents
    - sentences
    - phrases

Semantic Aggregation
    [subtask of NLG]

    Merging syntactic constituents together.

    Sometimes aggregation can be done at a
    conceptual level.

Bi-LSTM
    https://towardsdatascience.com/sentence-classification-using-bi-lstm-b74151ffa565

    Bidirectional.

asterisk at end of function name
    A variant function that handles multiple
    input arguments or multiple return values
    uses the same name, but suffixed with *.

    regexp-match vs. regexp-match*

progress last 2 years
    can train models more efficiently
    more variants of models

BLEU score
    perfect match = 1.0
    perfect mismatch = 0.0

    vimlinks +/"BLEU score in NMT" https://ricardokleinklein.github.io/2017/11/16/Attention-is-all-you-need.html

Decision tree regression
Decision tree (misnomer)
    Builds a regression or classification
    model in the form of a tree structure.

    Break down a dataset into smaller and
    smaller subsets while at the same time an
    associated decision tree is incrementally
    developed.

    Result:
    Tree with decision nodes and leaf nodes.

    Example:
    A decision node (e.g., Outlook) has two or
    more branches (e.g., Sunny, Overcast and
    Rainy), each representing values for the
    attribute tested. Leaf node (e.g., Hours
    Played) represents a decision on the
    numerical target. The topmost decision
    node in a tree which corresponds to the
    best predictor called root node. Decision
    trees can handle both categorical and
    numerical data.

Standard Deviation Reduction
    Based on the decrease in standard
    deviation after a dataset is split
    on an attribute.

    Constructing a decision tree is all about
    finding attribute that returns the highest
    standard deviation reduction (i.e., the
    most homogeneous branches).

Learning rate
    But the best learning rate in general is
    one that decreases as the model approaches
    a solution (minimum to the loss function).

    Hyperparameters
    - learning rate decay

Learning rate decay
    Used to decrease the learning rate as
    epochs go by to allow learning to advance
    faster at the beginning with larger
    learning rates.

batch size
    [#machine learning]

    The number of training examples utilized
    in one iteration.

    The batch size can be one of three
    options:
    - batch mode:
      batch size = size(total dataset)

      Thus iteration = epoch value.

    - mini-batch mode:
      batch size > 1, but
      batch size < size(total dataset)

      Usually, a number that can be divided into
      the total dataset size.

    - stochastic mode:
      batch size = 1

      Therefore the gradient and the neural
      network parameters are updated after each
      sample.

epoch
    [#deep learning]

    ewwlinks +/"When all the batches are fed exactly once you complete what is called an epoch." "https://www.quora.com/What-is-epochs-in-machine-learning"

    Suppose that you want to train a machine
    learning model with some data. That data
    you call training data.

    Now, the thing is that for huge sets of
    training data you cannot feed the whole
    bunch to your model at once due to
    limitations in computer memory.

    So, what you do is break up your whole
    training data set into sizeable batches
    which can fit into your computers memory
    at once.

    You then feed these batches one by one to
    your model for training.

    When all the batches are fed exactly once
    you complete what is called an epoch.
    Basically it is equivalent to showing your
    model the whole training data bunch once.

    Now, you have to carry this one multiple
    times for successful training, hence,
    multiple epochs.

Momentum
    vim +/"stuck in a local minimum" "$HOME/notes2018/problems-and-solutions.txt"

    Pushes your output towards global optimum.

    Too big or too small will ruin everything.

    Changes the path you take to the optimum.

    It helps overcome local optimum (If you
    get stuck).

    example:
        If you have an objective function, you
        have to decide how to move around on it.

        Steepest descent on the gradient is the
        simplest approach, but fluctuations could
        be a big problem.

        Adding momentum helps solve that problem.

    NOTE: High momentum should always be
    accompanied by low learning rate, else you
    will overshoot the global optimum.

    In my opinion the momentum should be more
    adaptive than constant. Sometimes you may
    be revolving around the global optimum.
    Recognizing that and changing your
    momentum is tough but a smart choice.

Adaptive learning rate method
    Computes individual learning rates for
    different parameters.

Adaptive Moment Estimation
Adam
    [optimiser]
    [adaptive learning rate method]

    Its name is derived from adaptive moment
    estimation, and the reason its called
    that is because Adam uses estimations of
    first and second moments of gradient to
    adapt the learning rate for each weight of
    the neural network.

    Now, what is moment ?

    N-th moment of a random variable is
    defined as the expected value of that
    variable to the power of n.

Training with SGD
    - Randomly initialise the weights to small
      numbers close to 0 (but not 0).

    - Input the first observation of your
      dataset in the input layer, each feature
      in one input node.

    - Forward propagation
      - The neurons are activated in a way
        that the impact of each neuron's
        activation is limited by the weights.
      - Propagate the activations until
        getting the predicted result y.

    - Compare the predicted result to the
      actual result. Measure the generated
      error.

    - Back-propagation:
      from right to left, the error is
      back-propagated. Update the weights
      according to how much they are
      responsibile for the error.

    - 2 next steps:
      - Reinforcement learning
        Repeat steps 1 to 5 and update the
        weights after each observation.
      - Batch learning
        Repeat steps 1 to 5 and update the
        weights only after a batch of
        observations.

    - When the whowle training set passed
      through the ANN, that makes an epoch.
      Redo more epochs.

Optimiser
    Used to minimise the error rate.

    Two metrics to determine the efficacy of
    an optimizer:
    - speed of convergence
      (the process of reaching a global
      optimum for gradient descent); and
    - generalization
      (the models performance on new data).

Word Embedding Language Divergence
WELD
    Divergence between unified similarity
    distribution of words between languages.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.08561v1

C-H logic correspondence
CurryHoward correspondence
CurryHoward isomorphism
CurryHoward equivalence
proofs-as-programs interpretation
propositions-as-types interpretation
formulae-as-types interpretation
    The direct relationship between computer
    programs and mathematical proofs.

head:tail notation
    (l:l1) ++ l2 = l : (l1 ++ l2)

bijective
bijection
bijective function
one-to-one correspondence
    A function between the elements of two
    sets, where each element of one set is
    paired with exactly one element of the
    other set, and each element of the other
    set is paired with exactly one element of
    the first set.

category theory
    More general that abstract algebra.

differentiable programming
    [programming paradigm]

    Programs can be differentiated throughout,
    usually via automatic differentiation.

    Allows for gradient based optimization of
    parameters in the program, often via
    gradient descent.

    As a big picture, I really believe that a
    purely functional typed approach to
    differentiable programming is the way to
    move forward in the future for models like
    artificial neural networks.

fixed-point combinator
fixpoint combinator
    [higher-order function]

    For any function f with some fixed point
    x, returns an unchanged x for that f.

endofunctor
    A functor from one category back to the
    same category.

    It maps objects of the category to objects
    of the same category.

    The simplest example is the identity
    functor which maps every object inside a
    category back to itself; more interesting
    examples map objects to other objects in
    the same category.

    Examples:
    - identity functor

    Interesting because they do a good job of
    representing structures inside categories
    that work for any object.

    Among other things, this is very useful
    for programming. The Haskell Functor class
    represents endofunctors on the category of
    Haskell types and functions, which
    includes pretty much every generic
    container among other things.

piezoelectric crystal
    Examples
    - quartz
      The first one to be discovered.

Photochromism
Photochromatic
    Changes color when exposed to light.

strange loop
    A cyclic structure that goes through
    several levels in a hierarchical system.

    It arises when, by moving only upwards or
    downwards through the system, one finds
    oneself back where one started.

    Is the universe a strange loop?

    May involve self-reference and paradox.

    The concept of a strange loop was proposed
    and extensively discussed by Douglas
    Hofstadter in Gödel, Escher, Bach, and is
    further elaborated in Hofstadter's book I
    Am a Strange Loop, published in 2007.

Oceanic Anoxic Event 2
OAE 2
    Took place around the CenomanianTuronian
    boundary (94 Ma), is associated with
    extreme perturbations to the global carbon
    cycle, affected ocean basins worldwide and
    was associated with significant biological
    turnover.

    Although this event has been well studied
    in the northern hemisphere, the evolution
    and character of OAE 2, particularly in
    terms of the vertical and lateral extent
    of anoxia, is poorly constrained in the
    palaeo-Pacific Ocean.

    Furthermore, the precise timing, duration
    and character of this event, and the exact
    mechanisms driving OAE 2 environmental
    changes, are still being debated.

lithology
lithologies
    The study of rocks.

    The character of a rock formation.

    A rock formation having a particular set
    of characteristics.

Magnetic susceptibility [of a material]
    dimensionless

    A proportionality constant.

    Indicates the degree of magnetization of a
    material in response to an applied
    magnetic field.

Sophie's paper (not the thesis)
    https://reader.elsevier.com/reader/sd/pii/S0012821X19302328?token=B142DF0BF0666ED4688DA82ACF393D341451B5D9F8EC1AFC98E46474DB7F0018A1EFE17A8FEA16149E4B35DCC174EAF2
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X19302328

    Present
    - high-resolution records of:
      - carbon isotopes,
      - total organic carbon, and
      - magnetic susceptibility

      from the southern palaeo-Pacific Ocean
      during OAE 2, sampled at two sections in
      New Zealand.

    The carbon isotope records from both
    localities reveal a 2 positive excursion
    that represents the global change in the
    carbon cycle associated with OAE 2.

    When combined with a cyclostratigraphic
    age model, these new records constrain the
    duration of the OAE 2 carbon isotope
    excursion to at least 930 ± 25 ky and
    indicate a minimum duration of 200 ± 25 ky
    for the Plenus Cold Event that took
    place during OAE 2.

    The lithologies and low organic-carbon
    contents of the New Zealand sections imply
    that oxic conditions prevailed along, at
    least parts of, the margins of the palaeo-
    Pacific Ocean at mid- to high southern
    latitudes during OAE 2 while,
    contemporaneously, conditions were locally
    anoxic in the mid-water column of the
    equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Despite these apparently oxic conditions
    in the New Zealand region, there was a
    partial collapse of benthic ecosystems
    leading up to, and during, OAE 2,
    suggesting environmental deterioration
    caused by intermittent oxygen deprivation,
    or other chemical or biological
    disturbances in the South Pacific region
    that remain to be elucidated.

purity
    checkSufficientBalanceForTransaction :: User -> Amount -> Result

        This function does not carry an IO
        label you know it cannot access the
        Internet, that it cannot read any
        files, and that it cannot by itself
        have any visible effect on the world.

        You are guaranteed that all it can do
        is access the data that is passed in
        (the User whose balance is to be
        checked, and the Amount the user would
        like to send) and return a Result that
        says whether the user's balance is
        sufficient.

bipartite
    2 parts

Bipartite Graph
    A graph whose vertices can be divided into
    two disjoint and independent sets.

Maximum Bipartite Matching
    A matching in a Bipartite Graph is a set
    of the edges chosen in such a way that no
    two edges share an endpoint.

    A maximum matching is a matching of
    maximum size (maximum number of edges).

    In a maximum matching, if any edge is
    added to it, it is no longer a matching.

    There can be more than one maximum
    matchings for a given Bipartite Graph.

moving-average
MA
    [model]

Autoregressive [model]
Autoregressive [process]
AR
    [#statistics]
    [#econometrics]
    [#signal processing]

    Example:
    - transformer

    Autoregression is a time series model that
    uses observations from previous time steps
    as input to a regression equation to
    predict the value at the next time step.
    It is a very simple idea that can result
    in accurate forecasts on a range of time
    series problems.

    The autoregressive model specifies that
    the output variable depends linearly on
    its own previous values and on a
    stochastic term (an imperfectly
    predictable term); thus the model is in
    the form of a stochastic difference
    equation.

    Every output sequence depends not only on
    the input, but also on previous outputs.

    Stochastic calculations in which future
    values are estimated based on a weighted
    sum of past values.

    A representation of a type of random
    process; as such, it is used to describe
    certain time-varying processes in nature,
    economics, etc.

autoregressive property
    "Autoregressive models decompose the joint
    density as a product of conditionals, and
    model each conditional in turn.
    Normalizing flows transform a base density
    (e.g. a standard Gaussian) into the target
    density by an invertible transformation
    with tractable Jacobian."

    In other words, the "autoregressive
    property" is equivalent to the
    decomposition:

        p(x) = prod{ p(x[i] | x[0:i]) : i=0, ..., d }.

    The provided shift_and_log_scale_fn,
    masked_autoregressive_default_template,
    achieves this property by zeroing out
    weights in its masked_dense layers.

    Practically speaking:
        There exists a permutation of the
        event coordinates such that each
        coordinate is a diffeomorphic function
        of only preceding coordinates.

flow network
transportation network
    [#graph theory]

    [directed graph]

    Each edge
    - has a capacity
    - receives a flow

    The amount of flow on an edge cannot
    exceed the capacity of the edge.

combinator
    A function or definition with no free
    variables.

    A pure lambda-expression that refers only
    to its arguments.

    Examples:
        \a -> a
        \a -> \b -> a
        \f -> \a -> \b -> f b a

Boomerang
    [language]

    For writing lenses.

lens
    Well-behaved bidirectional transformation.

    Operates on ad-hoc, textual data formats.

    Every lens program, when read from left to
    right, describes a function that maps an
    input to an output; when read from right
    to left, the very same program describes a
    "backwards" function that maps a modified
    output, together with the original input,
    back to a modified input.

lens
lenses
    [haskell/fp concept]

    https://github.com/ekmett/lens#lens-lenses-folds-and-traversals

Control.Lens
    The combinators in Control.Lens provide a
    highly generic toolbox for composing
    families of getters, folds, isomorphisms,
    traversals, setters and lenses and their
    indexed variants.

arrow
    [#haskell]

    A new abstract view of computation.

    They serve much the same purpose as
    monads -- providing a common structure for
    libraries -- but are more general.

    In particular they allow notions of
    computation that may be partially static
    (independent of the input) or may take
    multiple inputs.

    If your application works fine with
    monads, you might as well stick with
    them.

    But if you're using a structure that's
    very like a monad, but isn't one, maybe
    it's an arrow.

monad vs arrow
    Most importantly:
        There are more things which are arrows
        than there are things which are
        monads.

    Monads are strictly more powerful than
    arrows.

    Monad
        Is an arrow equipped with an apply
        function of type

            (a ~> b, a) ~> b

        where (~>) is the constructor for a
        given arrow.

        This destroys the meticulous
        distinction arrows maintain between
        terms and commands (or, if you prefer,
        objects and morphisms).

monad transformer
    https://wiki.haskell.org/Monad_Transformers_Explained

    Explanation:
        You have an innermost monad (usually
        Identity or IO but you can use any
        monad).

        You then wrap monad transformers
        around this monad to make bigger,
        better monads.

    Similar to a regular monad, but it's not a
    standalone entity: instead, it modifies
    the behaviour of an underlying monad.

    Most of the monads in the mtl library have
    transformer equivalents.

    By convention, the transformer version of
    a monad has the same name, with a T stuck
    on the end.

    For example, the transformer equivalent of
    State is StateT; it adds mutable state to
    an underlying monad.

    The WriterT monad transformer makes it
    possible to write data when stacked on top
    of another monad.

Continuous Bag of Words approach
    Word embeddings for each word in the
    sentence are aggregated to represent the
    entire sentence as a single vector.

    Achieves very respectable results in many
    NLP tasks.

Squaring the Triangle
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/TriangleSquaring.html

beta reduction
β reduction
    The process of calculating a result from
    the application of a function to an
    expression.

    Example
        Suppose we apply the function

        (\x -> 2*x*x + y)

        to the value 7.

        To calculate the result, we substitute
        7 for every occurrence of x, and so
        the application of the function

        (\x -> 2*x*x + y)(7)

        is reduced to the result

        2*7*7 + y

        This is a beta reduction.

Rasa Stack
    [#rasa]

    AI assistants have to fulfill two tasks:
    - understanding the user, and
      Rasa NLU
    - giving the correct responses.
      Rasa Core

Rasa NLU
    [#rasa]

    Language Understanding for chatbots and AI assistants
    https://rasa.com/docs/nlu/

    An open-source natural language processing
    tool for intent classification and entity
    extraction in chatbots.

    fallback behaviour
    - ask the user to rephrase if confidence is low

Confidence and Fallback Intents
    [#Rasa NLU]

    Each pipeline:
    - Reports a confidence score
    - Reports a predicted intent

    The CRFEntityExtractor component will do
    the same for the extracted entities.

Confidence Cutoff
    Choosing a confidence cutoff:
    - calculate the models confidence on a
      test set, and compare the confidence
      values on the correctly and incorrectly
      predicted examples.

confidence score
    Not a true probability that the prediction
    is correcty.

    A metric.

    Defined by the model.

    Approximately describes how similar the
    input was to the training data.

    Use the confidence score to choose when to
    ignore Rasa NLUs prediction and trigger
    fallback behaviour, for example asking the
    user to rephrase. If you are using Rasa
    Core, you can do this using a Fallback
    Policy.

Fixed point [of a function]
fixpoint
invariant point
    An element of the function's domain that
    is mapped to itself by the function.

    c is a fixed point of the function f(x) if:
    f(c) = c.

free monads
    [#haskell]
    [data type]

    Considered harmful:
    https://markkarpov.com/post/free-monad-considered-harmful.html

    What they are:
    http://www.haskellforall.com/2012/06/you-could-have-invented-free-monads.html
    http://www.parsonsmatt.org/2017/09/22/what_does_free_buy_us.html
    The above links are so nice in eww.

    Given a functor f gives us a monad Free f
    for free (or the most unconstrained
    monad we can get for that functor).

type families
    [#haskell]

lexicographic order
lexicographical order
lexical order
dictionary order
alphabetical order
lexicographic(al) product
    A generalization of the way words are
    alphabetically ordered based on the
    alphabetical order of their component
    letters.

DRY [programming]
Don't Repeat Yourself

anachronism
    A thing belonging or appropriate to a
    period other than that in which it exists,
    especially a thing that is conspicuously
    old-fashioned.

edition
    [#rust]

    Error:
    editions are unstable

    It's a type of versioning system for the
    rust compiler. Versions of rust are
    organised into 'editions'

    When a new edition becomes available in
    the compiler, crates must explicitly opt
    in to it to take full advantage.

weight initialization
    https://madaan.github.io/init/

finite Markov decision process
FMDP

Prefix code
Prefix property
    Requires that there is no whole code word
    in the system that is a prefix (initial
    segment) of any other code word in the
    system.

    Example:
        A code with code words {9, 55} has the
        prefix property; a code consisting of
        {9, 5, 59, 55} does not, because "5"
        is a prefix of "59" and also of "55".

noisy-or
    [problog construct]

    Parents independently influence a joint
    effect.

    If you define multiple rules with the same
    head, they will be combined as a noisy-or
    (a determistic or if all heads are
    deterministic).

    The strength of the noisy-or parents can
    be learned using LFI (the inhibition
    strengths).

problog
    Can develop representations that are
    compact and expressive but also easy to
    read and maintain.

in situ
    On site / in position.

sampling with replacement
    Find probability with replacement.

    Choose one persons name, put that
    persons name back in the hat, and then
    choose another name.

    Your two items are independent.

    One selection does not affect the outcome
    of the other.

    You have a 1 out of 7 (1/7) chance of
    choosing the first name and a 1/7 chance
    of choosing the second name.

    Example:
        You want to find the probability of
        some event. There ares a number of
        balls, cards or other objects, and you
        replace the item each time you choose
        one.

sampling without replacement
    Each sample unit of the population has
    only one chance to be selected in the
    sample.

    Example:
        If one draws a simple random sample
        such that no unit occurs more than one
        time in the sample, the sample is
        drawn without replacement.

Theia
    Water came to Earth with the formation of
    the Moon some 4.4 billion years ago.

    The Moon was formed when Earth was hit by
    a body about the size of Mars, also called
    Theia.

    Until now, scientists had assumed that
    Theia originated in the inner solar system
    near the Earth.

    However, researchers from Münster can now
    show that Theia comes from the outer solar
    system, and it delivered large quantities
    of water to Earth.


ODE
Ordinary Differential Equation
    A differential equation containing one or
    more functions of one independent variable
    and the derivatives of those functions.

    The term ordinary is used in contrast with
    the term partial differential equation
    which may be with respect to more than one
    independent variable.

Neural Ordinary Differential Equations
    [~2018]
    [a new family of deep neural network models]

    readsubs "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AD3K8j12EIE"

    Instead of specifying a discrete sequence
    of hidden layers, we parameterize the
    derivative of the hidden state using a
    neural network.

    The output of the network is computed
    using a black-box differential equation
    solver.

    Better than RNN on time-series data.

Espionage Act of 1917
    Passed, along with the Trading with the
    Enemy Act, just after the United States
    entered World War I in April 1917.

    Based on the Defense Secrets Act of 1911,
    especially the notions of obtaining or
    delivering information relating to
    "national defense" to a person who was not
    "entitled to have it", itself based on an
    earlier British Official Secrets Act.

    The Espionage Act law imposed much stiffer
    penalties than the 1911 law, including the
    death penalty.

generic programming
    [style of computer programming]

    Algorithms are written in terms of types
    to-be-specified-later that are then
    instantiated when needed for specific
    types provided as parameters.

    Allows most of this boilerplate to be
    written once and for all, or even
    generated mechanically, leaving the
    programmer free to concentrate on the
    important part of the algorithm. These
    generic programs are much more adaptive
    when faced with data structure evolution
    because they contain many fewer lines of
    typespecific code.

    This might solve my
    'try-to-filter-something-by-specific-way'
    problem.

    Use monads for this?

    Read this:
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/wp-content/uploads/2003/01/hmap.pdf
    This is very old, but it shows that
    Generic Programming with haskell is
    exactly what I've been raving about.

    Write code in a way where the programmer
    can concentrate on the problem and not on
    the extranous parsing and boilerplate.

    Haskell's 'Data' module provides classes
    for generic programming.
    http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.12.0.0/docs/Data-Data.html#g:1

singly linked list
    [#haskell]

    data List a = Nil | Cons a (List a)

binary tree
    [#haskell]

    data BinTree = Empty
              | Leaf Int
              | Node BinTree BinTree

tree
    [#haskell]

    data Tree a = Leaf a
                | Branch (Tree a) (Tree a)

Generalised Algebraic Data Type
GADT
    [#fp]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generalized_algebraic_data_type

    A GADT is a generalization of parametric
    algebraic data types.

    The 'A' in GADT always means Algebraic.

ADT
    [ambiguous acronym]

    Could be:
    - Abstract data type
    - Algebraic data type

    ewwlinks +/"Algebraic Data Type is not to be confused with \*Abstract\* Data Type, which" "https://wiki.haskell.org/Algebraic_data_type"

    Abstract Data Type is the opposite of Algebraic Data Type

Abstract Data Type
ADT
AbDT (to disambiguate with AlDT)
    A type (or class) for objects whose
    behavior is defined by a set of value and
    a set of operations

    May be defined as a "class of objects
    whose logical behavior is defined by a set
    of values and a set of operations".

    The characteristic feature of an AbDT is
    that the representation type is hidden.

    Don't confuse with 'Algebraic' Data Type.

anthropic principle
    [philosophical consideration]

    Observations of the universe must be
    compatible with the conscious and sapient
    life that observes it.

Algebraic Data Type
ADT
AlDT (to disambiguate with AbDT)
    [composite type]

    Formed by combining other types.

    A data type defined out of a combination
    of two constructions:
    - products, and
    - sums.

    Examples:
    - Singly linked list
    - Binary tree

    Product
    - A way to combine multiple values of
      different types into one.

      They're present in pretty much all
      languages, often called "structs",
      "records" or "tuples".

      In object-oriented programming, a class
      made up of public fields acts as a
      product type.

    Don't confuse with 'Abstract' Data Type.

data
data declaration
    [#haskell]

    hoogle -i --color data

    How one introduces new AlDT into Haskell. For example:

    Generic programming in Haskell

    It looks like we are building a struct.
    Not so much generic programming happening
    here.

    vim +/"data Val = Int Integer" "$MYGIT/acmeism/RosettaCodeData/Task/S-Expressions/Haskell/s-expressions.hs"

    create a datatype to hold an AST for an
    expression, one could use:

    data Exp = Ebin   Operator Exp Exp
             | Eunary Operator Exp
             | Efun   FunctionIdentifier [Exp]
             | Eid    SimpleIdentifier

    where the types
    - Operator,
    - FunctionIdentifier, and
    - SimpleIdentifier
    are defined elsewhere.

    The types
    - Ebin
    - Eunary
    - Efun
    are all types of Exp

    Exp is partially recursive.
    An Ebin can hold 2 of Exp.

deriving
    [#haskell]

    vim +/"| List \[Val\] deriving (Eq, Show)" "$MYGIT/acmeism/RosettaCodeData/Task/S-Expressions/Haskell/s-expressions.hs"

    data Deriving l
    haskell-src-exts Language.Haskell.Exts.Syntax
    A deriving clause following a data type declaration.

factor graph
    [bipartite graph]

    Represents the factorization of a
    function.

    Used to represent factorization of a
    probability distribution function,
    enabling efficient computations, such as
    the computation of marginal distributions
    through the sum-product algorithm.

    One of the important success stories of
    factor graphs and the sum-product
    algorithm is the decoding of capacity-
    approaching error-correcting codes, such
    as LDPC and turbo codes.

    Factor graphs generalize constraint
    graphs.

    A factor whose value is either 0 or 1 is
    called a constraint.

    A constraint graph is a factor graph where
    all factors are constraints.

    The max-product algorithm for factor
    graphs can be viewed as a generalization
    of the arc-consistency algorithm for
    constraint processing.

marginal distribution [of a subset of a collection of random variables]
    The probability distribution of the
    variables contained in the subset.

    Gives the probabilities of various values
    of the variables in the subset without
    reference to the values of the other
    variables.

    This contrasts with a conditional
    distribution.

conditional distribution
    Gives the probabilities contingent upon
    the values of the other variables.

conditional self-information

Variables-based models
    - Factor graphs
      - Arity
      - Assignment weight
      - Constraint satisfaction problem
      - Consistent assignment

    - Dynamic ordering
      - Dependent factors
      - Backtracking search
      - Forward checking
      - Most constrained variable
      - Least constrained value

      Approximate methods
      - Beam search
      - Iterated conditional modes
      - Gibbs sampling

      Factor graph transformations
      - Conditioning
      - Elimination

      Bayesian networks
      - Definition
      - Locally normalized
      - Marginalization

      Probabilistic program
      - Concept
      - Summary

      Inference
      - Forward-backward algorithm
      - Gibbs sampling
      - Laplace smoothing

temporal differece
    predicting this state and this tsate

    Create an emmbedding

    encodes all sensedory data (visual and action)

GAN
Generative Adversarial Network
    The generative network generates
    candidates while the discriminative
    network evaluates them.

    Invented by Ian Goodfellow.

    Contest often in the form of a zero-sum
    game.

marginal utility

Non-zero-sum game
    can be either:
    - competitive, or
    - non-competitive.

Zero-sum game
Strictly competitive game
    Each participant's gain or loss of utility
    is exactly balanced by the losses or gains
    of the utility of the other participants.

    If the total gains of the participants are
    added up and the total losses are
    subtracted, they will sum to zero.

    Example:
    - cutting a cake
      iff all participants value each unit of
      cake equally.
      See "marginal utility".

    In contrast, non-zero-sum describes a
    situation in which the interacting
    parties' aggregate gains and losses can be
    less than or more than zero.

    Most often solved with:
    - the minimax theorem
    - Nash equilibrium

minimax theorem
    Closely related to linear
    programming duality.

discriminator [network]
    [#GAN]

    Evaluates candidates from a generative
    network.

Distributed dense word vectors
    Shown to be effective at capturing
    token-level semantic and syntactic
    regularities in language, while topic
    models can form interpretable
    representations over documents.

embedding
    A feature vector representation of
    something.

    Good definition:
        The model's internal representation of
        an input.

    Example::
    - Word vector

latent space
    The model thinks that these variables are
    correlated and have meaning, but we have
    no idea why.

input embedder
    The first stage of the network, meant to
    convert the input into a feature vector
    representation.

categorical variable
    [variable]

    Can take on one of a limited, and usually
    fixed number of possible values, assigning
    each individual or other unit of
    observation to a particular group or
    nominal category on the basis of some
    qualitative property.

observable variable
manifest variable
    A variable that can be directly measured
    or observed.

    Opposite of a latent variable,

latent variable
    Can not be directly observed.

    Needs a manifest variable assigned to it
    as an indicator to test whether it is
    present.

latent variable model
    [statistical model]

    Relates a set of observable variables to a
    set of latent variables.

putative gene structure

modus tollens
method of denying
    [rule of logic]

Microcode
    [computer hardware technique]

    Imposes an interpreter between the CPU
    hardware and the programmer-visible
    instruction set architecture of the
    computer.

Perplexity
    A measure of the quality of a language
    model.

    vimlinks +/"Evaluating language models: perplexity" "http://frnsys.com/ai_notes/machine_learning/natural_language_processing.html"

    http://www.exploredatabase.com/2020/04/evaluation-of-language-model-using-perplexity.html
    A way to measure the quality of a LM
    independent of any application.

    Measures how well a probability model
    predicts the test data.

    The model that assigns a higher
    probability to the test data is the better
    model.
        A good model will assign a high
        probability to a real sentence.

        For example, let us assume that we
        estimate the probability of a test data
        using a bi-gram model and a tri-gram
        model.

        The better model among these is the one
        that has a tighter fit to the test data,
        or predicts the details of the test data
        better.

    Lower the perplexity, higher the
    probability.

    An intrinsic evaluation metric (a metric
    that evaluates the given model independent
    of any application such as tagging, speech
    recognition etc.).

ambiguity
    One of the greatest challenges to NLP:
    Example:
    - Fed raises interest rates, where
      "raises" is the verb, and "Fed" is the
      noun phrase
    - Fed raises interest rates, where
      "interest" is the verb, and "Fed raises"
      is the noun phrase

    Occurs at many levels:
    - acoustic
      e.g. mixing up similar-sounding words
    - syntactic level
      e.g. multiple plausible grammatical
      parsings of a sentence
    - semantic level
      e.g. some words can mean multiple things
      ("bank" as in a river or a financial
      institution); this is called word sense
      ambiguity
    - discourse (multi-clause)
      e.g. unclear what a pronoun is referring
      to

synset
    A set of synonyms that represent a single
    sense of a word.

wordform
    The full inflected surface form.

    Example:
    "cat" and "cats" are different wordforms.

lemma
    The same stem, part of speech, rough word sense

    Example:
    "cat" and "cats" are the same lemma.

    One lemma can have many meanings.

    Example:
    a bank can hold investments...
    agriculture on the east bank...

sense
    A discrete representation of an aspect of
    a word's meaning.

    The usages of bank in the previous example
    have a different sense.

homonyms
    Words that share form but have unrelated,
    distinct meanings (such as "bank").

    - Homographs: bank/bank, bat/bat
    - Homophones: write/right, piece/peace

polysemy
    A polysemous word has related meanings,
    for example:

    - "the bank was built in 1875 ("bank" = a
      building belonging to a financial
      institution)"
    - "I withdrew money from the bank ("bank"
      = a financial institution)"

    - Systematic polysemy, or metonymy, is
      when the meanings have a systematic
      relationship.
    - For example, "school", "university",
      "hospital" - all can mean the
      institution or the building, so the
      systematic relationship here is building
      <=> organization.
    - Another example is author <=> works of
      author, e.g. "Jane Austen wrote Emma"
      and "I love Jane Austen".

synonyms
    Different words that have the same
    propositional meaning in some or all
    contexts.

    However, there may be no examples of
    perfect synonymy since even if
    propositional meaning is identical, they
    may vary in notions of politeness or other
    usages and so on.

    Examples:
    - "water" and "H2O" - each are more
      appropriate in different contexts.
    - "big" and "large" - sometimes they can
      be swapped, sometimes they cannot:
      - That's a big plane. How large is that
        plane? (Acceptable)
      - Miss Nelson became kind of a big
        sister to Benjamin. Miss Nelson became
        kind of a large sister to Benjamin
        (Not as acceptable)

      The latter works less because "big" has
      multiple senses, one of which does not
      correspond to "large".

antonyms
    Senses which are opposite with respect to
    one feature of meaning, but otherwise are
    similar, such as dark/light, short/fast,
    etc.

hyponym
    One sense is a hyponym of another if the
    first sense is more specific (i.e. denotes
    a subclass of the other).

    Examples:
    - car is a hyponym of vehicle
    - mango is a hyponym of fruit

hypernym
superordinate
    Examples:
    - vehicle is a hypernym of car
    - fruit is a hypernym of mango

token
    An instance of that type in running text;
    $N$ = number of tokens, i.e. counting
    every word in the sentence, regardless of
    uniqueness.

type
    An element of the vocabulary; $V$ =
    vocabulary = set of types ($|V|$ = the
    size of the vocabulary), i.e. counting
    every unique word in the sentence.

Tensorflow
    http://theprofessionalspoint.blogspot.com/2019/05/tensorflow-tensors-computational-graphs.html

Estimator
    [#tensorflow]
    [Tensorflow API]

    Used to implement algorithms.

    Can import following estimators APIs to
    solve a lot of classification and
    regression problems:
    - tf.estimator.LinearRegressor
    - tf.estimator.LinearClassifier
    - tf.estimator.BoostedTreesRegressor
    - tf.estimator.BoostedTreesClassifier
    - tf.estimator.DNNClassifier
    - tf.estimator.DNNLinearCombinedClassifier

    Used for
    - creating computational graphs,
    - initializing variables,
    - training the model, and
    - saving checkpoint
    - logging files for Tensorboard.

    In order to use estimators, must create:
    - feature columns, and
    - input functions.

Input function
    [#tensorflow]

    Used for passing input data to the model
    for training and evaluation.

Feature columns
    Specifications for how the model should
    interpret the input data.

    We will see these concepts in detail when
    we solve a problem using TensorFlow in my
    future posts.

locus
loci (plural)
    [#genetics]

    A fixed position on a chromosome, like the
    position of a gene or a marker (genetic
    marker).

    Example:
        Each chromosome carries many genes;
        human's estimated 'haploid' protein
        coding genes are 19,00020,000, on the
        23 different chromosomes.

F-algebra
    [#category theory]

    F-algebras generalize algebraic structure.

    Rewriting the algebraic laws in terms of
    morphisms eliminates all references to
    quantified elements from the axioms, and
    these algebraic laws may then be glued
    together in terms of a single functor F,
    the signature.

    F-algebras can also be used to represent
    data structures used in programming, such
    as lists and trees.

catamorphism
    [#category theory]

    Deconstructs a data structure with an
    F-algebra for its underlying functor.

    A catamorphism for some F-algebra (X,f) is
    denoted (| f |)F.

    When the functor F can be determined
    unambiguously, it is usually written (|φ|)
    or cata φ.

    Due to this choice of notation, a
    catamorphism is sometimes called a banana
    and the (|.|) notation is sometimes
    referred to as banana brackets.

    Examples:
        $MYGIT/acmeism/RosettaCodeData/Task/Catamorphism/C++/catamorphism.cpp

    The unique homomorphism from an initial
    algebra into some other algebra.

    In FP, catamorphisms provide
    generalizations of folds of lists to
    arbitrary algebraic data types, which can
    be described as initial algebras.

    The dual concept is that of anamorphism
    that generalize unfolds.

    A hylomorphism is the composition of an
    anamorphism followed by a catamorphism.

existential types
    [#haskell]

    ifl existential type haskell

    Normally when creating a new type using
    type, newtype, data, etc., every type
    variable that appears on the right-hand
    side must also appear on the left-hand
    side.

    Existential types are a way of turning
    this off.

template Haskell
    [#haskell]

generics
    [#haskell]

type applications
    [#haskell]

TypeInType
    [#haskell]
    [WIP language extension]

    Modern type-level programming.

    Covers a wealth of features, all with the
    aim of creating a dependently typed
    Haskell.

language extensions
    [#haskell]

    cd $MYGIT/facebook/duckling/Duckling/; grep -HnR "# LANGUAGE" . | scrape "LANGUAGE [^ ]+" | uniqnosort
    sed -n "s/.*LANGUAGE \(.*\)/\1\n    [haskell language extension]\n/ip"

PostfixOperators
    [haskell language extension]

    ewwlinks +/"PostfixOperators" "https://www.schoolofhaskell.com/school/to-infinity-and-beyond/pick-of-the-week/guide-to-ghc-extensions/basic-syntax-extensions"

    Normally, when you write, for example:

        (4 !)

    it expands into:

        \x -> 4 ! x

    or, equivalently:

        \x -> (!) 4 x

    PostfixOperators instead expands this left section into:

        (!) 4

Data.Typeable and Data.Data
    ewwlinks +/"Typeable and Data in Haskell" "https://chrisdone.com/posts/data-typeable/"

    Rather mysterious.

    Starting out as a Haskell newbie you see
    them once in a while and wonder what use
    they are.

    Their Haddock pages are pretty opaque and
    scary in places.

    Here's a quick rundown I thought I'd write
    to get people up to speed nice and quick
    so that they can start using it.

    It's really rather beautiful as a way to
    do generic programming in Haskell.

    The general approach is that you don't
    know what data types are being given to
    you, but you want to work upon them almost
    as if you did.

    The technique is simple when broken down.

DeriveDataTypeable
    [haskell language extension]

    Now you can derive instances of both
    Data.Typeable and Data.Data:

        data X = X
          deriving (Data,Typeable)

    Now we can start doing generic operations
    upon X.

MultiParamTypeClasses
    [haskell language extension]

DeriveAnyClass
    [haskell language extension]

DeriveGeneric
    [haskell language extension]

NoRebindableSyntax
    [haskell language extension]

TypeFamilies
    [haskell language extension]

OverloadedStrings
    [haskell language extension]

GADTs
    [haskell language extension]

LambdaCase
    [haskell language extension]

tuple constructor
    [#haskell]

    Example:

        (,,,,) 1 "hello" 6.5 (Just ()) [5, 5, 6, 7]


    See:
        vim +/"TupleSections" "$HOME/notes/glossary.txt"

TupleSections
    [haskell language extension]

    ewwlinks +/"TupleSections" "https://www.schoolofhaskell.com/school/to-infinity-and-beyond/pick-of-the-week/guide-to-ghc-extensions/basic-syntax-extensions"

    Allows you to:
    - omit values from the tuple syntax,
      unifying the standard tuple sugar with
      the tuple constructor syntax to form one
      generalized syntax for tuples.

    Normally, tuples are constructed with the
    standard tuple sugar, which looks like
    this:

        (1, "hello", 6.5, Just (), [5, 5, 6, 7])

    This could be considered shorthand for the
    following explicit tuple constructor use:

        (,,,,) 1 "hello" 6.5 (Just ()) [5, 5, 6, 7]

    However, the explicit tuple constructor
    (,,,,) could just as easily be considered
    section sugar for tuples, expanding to:

        \v w x y z -> (v, w, x, y, z)

    Looking at it this way allows us to ask,
    Why cant we partially section a tuple?
    After all, (+) is valid, (,) is valid, and
    (1 +) is valid, but (1,) is not valid. The
    TupleSections extension fixes this
    oversight.

    With TupleSections you can now write, for
    example:

        (1, "hello",, Just (),)

    and have it mean the same as

        \x y -> (1, "hello", x, Just (), y)

NamedFieldPuns
    [haskell language extension]

    ewwlinks +/"Record puns are enabled by the flag -XNamedFieldPuns." "https://downloads.haskell.org/~ghc/7.6.2/docs/html/users_guide/syntax-extns.html"

    When using records, it is common to write
    a pattern that binds a variable with the
    same name as a record field, such as:

        data C = C {a :: Int}
        f (C {a = a}) = a

    Record punning permits the variable name
    to be elided, so one can simply write

        f (C {a}) = a

RecordWildCards
    [haskell language extension]

AllowAmbiguousTypes
    [haskell language extension]

ExistentialQuantification
    [haskell language extension]

FlexibleContexts
    [haskell language extension]

FlexibleInstances
    [haskell language extension]

RankNTypes
    [haskell language extension]

ScopedTypeVariables
    [haskell language extension]

StandaloneDeriving
    [haskell language extension]

TypeOperators
    [haskell language extension]

BangPatterns
    [haskell language extension]

Math
    Purely functional.

    vimlinks +/"Mathematics is a purely functional language. " "http://matt.might.net/articles/discrete-math-and-code/"

The Code of Hammurabi
    A well-preserved Babylonian code of law of
    ancient Mesopotamia, dated back to about
    1754 BC (Middle Chronology).

    One of the oldest deciphered writings of
    significant length in the world.

    Consists of 282 laws, with scaled
    punishments, adjusting "an eye for an eye,
    a tooth for a tooth" (lex talionis) as
    graded based on social stratification
    depending on social status and gender, of
    slave versus free, man versus woman.

contract
    [#racket]

    Rich, expressive contracts take the place
    of dependent types.

disjoint union
tagged union
discriminated union
    [...of a family of sets]

    A modified union operation that indexes
    the elements according to which set they
    originated in.

universal type
    [#racket]

    Racket is an untyped languages.

    vimlinks +/"no need for a special embedding" "http://matt.might.net/articles/discrete-math-and-code/"

        The universal type is already the sum
        of all types, there is no need for a
        special embedding.

set
    [#discrete math]

    Code implementations /
      representation / encoding:
    - a type
    - inheritance
      subsets
    - collection
      power of a set
    - red-black tree
    - predicate
      subset

sequence
    [#discrete math]

    Code implementations /
      representation / encoding:
    - linked list
    - functional programming list type
      - haskell's []
      - racket / lisp lists

vector
    [#discrete math]

    Code implementations /
      representation / encoding:
    - array

infinite sequence
    [#discrete math]

    Code implementations /
      representation / encoding:
    - stream
    - lazy list (haskell)

regression
    Like the Rosetta Stone between math,
    statistics, machine learning, and
    programming.

linear regression
    A basic and commonly used type of
    predictive analysis.

    The overall idea of regression is to
    examine two things:
    - (1) does a set of predictor variables do
      a good job in predicting an outcome
      (dependent) variable?
    - (2) Which variables in particular are
      significant predictors of the outcome
      variable, and in what way do
      theyindicated by the magnitude and sign
      of the beta estimatesimpact the outcome
      var